Executive Council looks to future near end of triennium

first_img April 20, 2012 at 4:49 pm I’m sure that some heart felt repentance and a return to the Lordship of Christ and the authority of the Bible would go far to “save” TEC from its declining membership and insecure future. Then they could rest of Scripture’s promise that not even the “gates of Hell” would prevail against them. But as it stands now, they are supporting the wrong side of that Scriptural promise. After 35 years as an Episcopalian, they certainly have broken their vow to me and my heart in the process. I can only wonder how Our Lord feels. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Tlhe Rev. Robert A. Terrill says: Executive Council, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Executive Council looks to future near end of triennium Changes in the church get members’ attention Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH April 18, 2012 at 5:48 pm Corrections would not be a revision – the budget would remain the same it would just be a document Deputies could deal with as they go to GC. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rich McDonough says: Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (5) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls The Rev. Ann Fontaine says: Comments are closed. Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City, Utah]  The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council began its last meeting of the 2010-2012 triennium contemplating its leadership role — and emotional investment — in the church’s journey to its future.The council has spent much of the last three years exploring how the Episcopal Church must change in response to the challenges facing all mainline churches, including declining memberships and thus declining finances, demographic shifts and cultural changes in the place and authority accorded to religious communities in society. When General Convention convenes in July in Indianapolis, deputies and bishops will grapple with a variety of calls (some of the proposals can be seen here) for changes in the church’s structure that their proposers say will help the church meet those challenges.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson and Bishop Stacy Sauls, Episcopal Church chief operating officer, all addressed the impact and implications of those challenges during their opening remarks April 18.Jefferts Schori reminded council members that they began the current triennium “just past a major budget cut [made by the previous meeting of Convention] that forced a public and painful reduction in church center staff.”She said that the cut was prompted by the economic crisis that “only hurried a reality that has been emerging for some time,” adding that the Episcopal Church, like other denominations, “is declining in numbers, financial strength, and societal influence.”Such decline causes grief, she said, “as former ways of living, governing, and privilege disappear.” Grief “can elicit anger, denial, and attempts to go back to some remembered golden age,” but none of those responses heals the grief nor does “tinkering with details.”Tension within the council during the last three years is what the presiding bishop called “a symptom of collective grief,” for which she hoped the members will find healing during the meeting that they can carry to the wider church. “Your willingness to endure these difficulties has been sacrificial, both as a faithful act of holiness, and as a sacramental act on behalf of others,” she told the council.Jefferts Schori said the Spirit is calling the council and the church to “let go of what is dead and embrace the new life that’s emerging.”“We’re looking toward a church that is more varied and less rigidly controlled, more networked and less directed,” the presiding bishop suggested. “This new church is going to be more organic, more profoundly a body with uniquely gifted parts, each one honored and blessed for the service of God’s mission.”Jefferts Schori said no one, including her, “knows exactly what this church is going to look like — and that scares some folks to death.”“We do know that perfect love casts out fear, and when we can remember how deeply and completely love dwells within us, the fear does begin to recede,” she said.Anderson told the council that her prayer is that “in the end, the process of restructuring the Episcopal Church will allow us to listen more closely to people who do not carry important titles or sit in the councils of the church, but who know a great deal — perhaps more than we do — about how to create the next kind of church that God is calling into being.”The House of Deputies president added that she wants the church to approach change in a way “that will keep us from the unintended consequences that come from reactive decision-making. I want us to keep the decision-making in the hands of all the baptized and not an elite few.”The church needs a conceptual framework for meeting the adaptive challenges it faces and accomplishing the technical fixes it needs, she said, explaining that adaptive challenges, such as declining membership and thus declining revenue, must not be addressed hastily. Anderson suggested that the church approach General Convention with a focus on what it can accomplish as a legislative body to implement technical fixes that “will give us room to think, to talk, to come up with ways to transform the ‘organization’ of the church into a ‘movement’ that embraces the faith, wisdom and voices of all the baptized.”The 77th meeting of convention could consider such fixes as changing the way dioceses may merge, reducing the number of standing committees to use limited-term working groups and reconsidering how the church’s endowment funds are used now and in the future, she said.However, she warned that approaching restructuring as a way to be efficient “run[s] a grave risk of diminishing the voices of laypeople and clergy” and if restructuring is about simply saving money then “mission priorities take a back seat to number crunching.”And, Anderson said, “if we approach restructuring believing in the false choice between governance and mission, we risk losing our central identity as a people whose democratic decision-making has led us time and time again to take prophetic action on issues of justice and peace and build strong mission relationships with one another and across the Anglican Communion.”Sauls described for council what he said is the paradox faced by all vestries, councils, and boards: They “have a fiduciary duty to use financial assets so that the institution survives, but survival is not a value of the Gospel this institution exists to serve.”He noted that Jesus told his disciples that those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for his sake will save it.“We need to have a conversation about, given the inherent paradox of trying to lead a Christian community, what are the structures that will help us and how are our resources most faithfully deployed,” Sauls said.“The conversation I long to have with you as the elected leadership of the Episcopal Church is not about the panic of our declining numbers but about how we strengthen what is working best out there and make what is strong stronger so that the strong can serve the less than strong,” he said.That conversation would also put “everything on the table about our common life” and look at it in light of what Jesus said about survival and what the church believes about resurrection, Sauls said.Saying that putting everything on the table would help rebuild the church “for a new time that has no precise historical precedent,” Sauls suggested that the conversation include dioceses and “how the ministry of a bishop relates to a particular people rather than to a particular geography,” and “how bishops should work with each other collegially and how often they should meet together.” The agenda could also include the role of the presiding bishop as primate of the church, “how other clergy and laypeople participate in the councils of the church [and how they] are encouraged to live out their baptisms by proclaiming the good news of what God has done in Christ by word and example” and “how we use the resource of a church-wide staff to serve local mission and ministry.”A number of council members responded to the three’s opening remarks. Saying that “it’s not a question of whether we’re going to change, it’s a question of how,” Dylan Breuer of the Diocese of Massachusetts warned her colleagues about “false dichotomies.”“The choices that are before us … are not binary choices,” she said. “They require creativity, they require 360 degree thinking. We could go in any number of ways.” She added that setting up either-or thinking “sometimes can imply that those who disagree with us are less spiritually sound.”Katie Sherrod of the Diocese of Fort Worth praised the idea that people outside of the traditional governance structures of the church would be called by council to “come be the leaders of this church.”She told Jefferts Schori, Anderson and Sauls that “all three of you have called us into a wonderful new way of thinking, but we have to make that compact among ourselves that we will assume good intentions on the part everyone and we will not bad-mouth someone even in private because that taints our thinking.”Some of the tensions the council has faced surfaced during an evaluation of the 2012-2015 draft budget process council completed at its January meeting.Ohio Bishop Mark Hollingsworth questioned why council could not correct the “mistakes and errors” in the version of the draft budget council forwarded to the church’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) in January. He asked whether council could send that group a revised version.Jefferts Schori and the Rev. Canon Gregory Straub, executive officer and secretary of the General Convention, said canons prevent the council from revising the budgetThe Rev. Winnie Varghese of the Diocese of New York said she would, for the second time in a row, speak against the budget at convention because twice now “the final document does not reflect what the body asked for or decided [and] I find that an incredibly difficult position to be in.”The Rev. Gay Jennings of the Diocese of Ohio said that “we did send a budget that had mistakes in it, so to me it’s a matter of the integrity of Executive Council” because the budget sent to PB&F “was not what some of us believed was adopted.”Jefferts Schori said that PB&F “is fully aware of what the issues are and I think there’s a piece of this that is our ability to let it go.” She later agreed with Bruce Garner of the Diocese of Atlanta that a “memo of information” from council to PB&F “would be entirely appropriate.”PB&F Chair Diane Pollard (Diocese of New York) and Vice Chair Steve Lane, bishop of Maine, recently posted a letter on various websites, including here, noting “some internal inconsistencies and at least one error in the draft proposed budget.” They said that the budget cannot be changed until General Convention.Jefferts Schori concluded the evaluation discussion by saying this part of the budget process was not perfect but it was “a sign and a symbol of the transition we’re engaged in” and she suggested that the “push-back and anger is a reflection of what’s going on in the larger system,” especially because some people did not get what they wanted or they cannot see whether or not what they wanted is in the budget document.“We’re in a significant transition and you are receiving some of the cost of leadership and it’s OK,” she said. “God will work something out of this that’s new and different.”Council members then spent 90 minutes participating in an anti-racism exercise. Several members later told ENS that the exercise’s presentations and subsequent discussions helped move the group towards the healing that Jefferts Schori called for earlier in the morning.Executive Council is meeting for three days in Salt Lake City. Members spent the remainder of April 18 meeting in committees and will continue to do so the morning of April 19. The members will reconvene in plenary session that afternoon. Council will spend the entire day April 20 in plenary considering reports and resolutions.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by provincial synods for six-year terms, plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET April 19, 2012 at 8:54 am If EC sends a “memo of information” re the Budget, it should go to all Deputies and Bishops, not just PB&F. The most helpful form of such a memo, as suggested by Liz Zivanov on HOBD, would be an actual budget spreadsheet showing the corrected draft budget as intended by EC, but titled in such a way as to avoid the canonical issues mentioned by Diane Pollard, +Stephen Lane, the PB and Canon Straub. If, as I believe is the case, PB&F has already begun its work, I also don’t see why PB&F could not release an updated “working draft” of the budget at or shortly before the opening of Convention. I’m sure we have enough smart canon lawyers among us who could frame this in a way that complies with canonical requirements. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 18, 2012 Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Carol Rollo says: Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA April 20, 2012 at 1:53 pm I could not agree more. Many of our dioceses were established when travel was difficult and there was a need to have a Bishop closer to a specific geographic area, ie Lexington being split from Kentucky. There needs to be some logic when defining what a diocese is, in today’s world. Should there be a minimum number of members in a diocese? Can dioceses be merged within a state? Where I live, 4 churches are closer to the Diocese of Southern Ohio, and may have more in common with, than Lexington. Could they be better served from Cincinnati than Lexington (not a suggestion, just a question)? Executive Council April 2012 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI April 18, 2012 at 6:10 pm Most if not all of the resolutions on church structure speak to restructuring at the national level. This does not go far enough. We have too many dioceses and bishops. Fulltime clergy are losing their jobs, our membership is down, yet we are moribund when it comes to diocesan consolidation with fewer bishops. How much better we would be in engaging the Great Commission with less overhead at the judicatory level. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Jack Zamboni says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Photo scavenger hunts, virtual prayer walks and lots of crafts:…

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS COVID-19, Photo scavenger hunts, virtual prayer walks and lots of crafts: Sunday school has left the building Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Featured Events Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Youth & Young Adults In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Children, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Egan MillardPosted May 1, 2020 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls The Rev. Jack Clark, associate rector at the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Massachusetts, tells the story of Palm Sunday in Jerusalem in a virtual Holy Week prayer walk video.[Episcopal News Service] Adapting church services to a virtual format is hard enough, but how do you do the same for Sunday school programs that are typically hands-on, interactive classes? Christian formation teachers across The Episcopal Church have found success with a variety of high-tech and low-tech methods. As Zoom and Facebook Live have become the new sanctuary, they’ve also become the new Sunday school classroom in the span of just a few weeks.“One Sunday in March, I am in the hallway with other parents waiting for our children to finish Sunday school. The next week, I am trying to learn how to have a watch party [for] the Facebook Live Morning Prayer being done by Fr. Andrew, standing alone in the small chapel of Good Shepherd Episcopal Church,” said Jana Auchterlonie, a Sunday school teacher at the Wichita, Kansas, church.Two days later, she’d created a private Facebook group for the Sunday school families, and they’ve since fallen into a routine. A family will volunteer to make a short video about the day’s readings, paired with activity ideas, like sing-alongs, and craft projects, like resurrection gardens.“I have been so heartened by the amazing things our families have done and how the lessons have felt connected and relevant to our current experiences,” Auchterlonie told Episcopal News Service. “One of my favorites so far is a middle-schooler and her mom, who read and discussed [the story of] doubting Thomas, and the child mentioned how the disciples were stuck in a room for fear of the Jewish leaders and we are stuck at home for fear of the virus. They then shared how to say ‘peace be with you’ in different languages, even sign language.”Craft projects, a staple of traditional Sunday school activities, can be a welcome resource for parents juggling work, school and other household responsibilities as they try to keep their kids occupied. At the Church of the Holy Spirit in Lebanon, New Jersey, Lindsay Wyglendowski and Michelle Marlow produced a series of “virtual formation” videos during Lent telling the stories of the Stations of the Cross and pairing them with simple art projects that kids can do with materials they probably already have at home. Families could then upload their photos to a shared Google Drive folder to share their creations.Parents who have run out of craft supplies need not run out to the store to find something church-related for their kids to do. For some, all you need is a printer, paper and crayons. Washington National Cathedral has released a series of printable coloring sheets featuring some of the cathedral’s famous gargoyles and stained-glass windows.“With D.C. children home from school and parents working to provide child care around the clock, the cathedral decided to offer these as a way to help families stay engaged from afar, and in a way that taps into kids’ creativity,” cathedral spokesman Tony Franquiz told ENS.And as busy parents try to limit their kids’ screen time, the combination of video lessons and simple crafts offers something more wholesome for them to watch – like the videos Emily Tanis-Likkel, family life minister at St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church in Seattle, Washington, produces every Sunday. In a slow, calming format reminiscent of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” Tanis-Likkel tells biblical stories like the road to Emmaus and the resurrection using figurines and dioramas. Tanis-Likkel then meets with the kids on Zoom to check in and talk about the story.Some even venture into the realm of virtual reality. The Rev. Jack Clark, associate rector at the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Massachusetts, recorded a video telling the story of Holy Week using a mix of real and virtual backgrounds with help from parishioner Dan Fickes, who works in video production. Using a script adapted from Gretchen Wolff Pritchard’s “Prayer Walk of the Passion,” Clark takes the viewers to a hillside in Jerusalem, the Last Supper, the Garden of Gethsemane, and Jesus’ tomb.And some churches are experimenting with new interactive experiences that probably wouldn’t have happened if not for COVID-19. In Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church organized a weeklong “photo scavenger hunt” for Holy Week and Easter. Each day, a different prompt was posted on the church’s Facebook page, corresponding with a theme or a moment from the life of Jesus, such as water to represent baptism and flowers to represent the Garden of Gethsemane. Families could find the object of the day and take photos of themselves with it, which they could then share on the Facebook post.“Many participated and found that very engaging,” said Sarah-Emily Steinhardt, the parish’s member engagement coordinator. “Our children’s ministry coordinator also provides a separate video with discussion questions, from curriculum we already have in place, and that is shared on social media as well.”Recognizing that Christian formation starts at home, many churches are offering support and resources to parents, too, like the “Parents After Dark” Zoom calls that St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, organizes. Another North Carolina church, St. James Parish in Wilmington, sends parents activities and discussion prompts that are targeted to different age groups. Parents received guides for how to talk to their preschool and elementary school kids about anxiety and how to manage their own pandemic-related anxiety. It required some extra work, but Shannon Lockamy, the parish’s children’s ministries assistant, wanted to make sure that parents have the age-appropriate resources they need during such a difficult time.“It takes some coordinating on our side, but if we reach even one family, all of the work is worth it!” she told ENS.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

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Apopka business incorporates simple and sustainable green business practices

first_img Orange County Environmental Protection Division works with local businesses to go green and stay green Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSBloem LLCOrange County Environmental Protection Division Previous articleApopka Police Department Arrest ReportNext articleAt least 2% of US public water systems are like Flint’s – Americans just don’t hear about them Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Corporate sustainability has become synonymous with social and environmental responsibility. One Apopka-based company, Bloem LLC, which manufactures innovative outdoor garden products, took the initiative to upgrade older manufacturing equipment in an effort to drive sustainability and reduce operational costs.It also upgraded to an LED lighting system and made several other eco-friendly changes. The result has been a greener and safer workplace, and a return on investment.“The new equipment uses a fraction of the air, electrical and hydraulic utilities,” said Bradford Whaley, Bloem’s maintenance manager. “Additionally, the switch to LED lighting has provided immediate savings on our plant’s energy costs.”Bloem recognized what processes needed to be improved and made the necessary changes to benefit both the environment and the company’s bottom line. Many other companies could see positive returns by making similar changes but are not sure how to get started. The Orange County Environmental Protection Division has a free service that can help. Local businesses can contact the Pollution Prevention (P2) Program to find ways to reduce air emissions, wastewater discharges, energy and water consumption, and the amount of both hazardous and solid waste they generate.“If it seems overwhelming and you don’t know where to start, even small, incremental steps can make a difference, and this is where we can assist you,” said Aimee Krivan, the division’s program coordinator.For more information on how Orange County’s Environmental Protection Division can help your business or workplace go green and save green, contact [email protected] or visit www.ocfl.net/EPD.Photo Caption: Apopka-based company, Bloem, LLC, is an example of a local company incorporating simple and sustainable green business practices. Please enter your name here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate From the Orange County Newsroomlast_img read more

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Detroit water shutoffs prompt Canadian solidarity

first_imgThousands demand water in Detroit, July 18.WW photo: Kris HamelEfforts by Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr to carry out the program of restructuring in favor of the banks and corporations during the city’s bankruptcy proceedings have drawn growing opposition from inside Detroit and beyond.On July 24, a delegation from Windsor, Ontario, representing the Council of Canadians and the Canadian Union of Public Employees, arrived to find a crowd of more than 100 people waiting outside the Coleman A. Young Municipal Center, where the EM and local political officials have their offices. While waiting for the Canadians’ arrival, representatives from a number of community organizations spoke out against the ongoing attacks leveled against the working class and poor residents of this majority African-American city.Representatives from the Moratorium NOW! Coalition, Michigan Welfare Rights Organization, People’s Water Board and others are calling for an indefinite halt to the water shutoffs, which have escalated since the spring. They are also demanding that every household whose water services have been terminated have its water turned back on and that there should be no privatization of the public water system in Detroit.The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department announced in federal bankruptcy court on July 21 that it was suspending shutoffs for 15 days. However, Homrich Co. trucks, from the private firm hired by Orr to carry out many of the shutoffs, are still on the job, this time going after those who have allegedly “turned their water back on illegally.”After being held up briefly at the tunnel crossing at the Windsor-Detroit border, the water convoy arrived to cheers from waiting activists. Maude Barlow, chairperson of the Council of Canadians, spoke to the crowd and reiterated the organization’s view that the water shutoffs are a complete violation of human rights.Barlow, a concerned advocate for water rights, was instrumental in bringing the dire situation in Detroit to the United Nations’ attention. A U.N. statement that the massive termination of water services was inhumane assisted in the political struggle to draw national and international attention to the plight of the people of Detroit.After the rally concluded, the convoy headed to St. Peter’s Episcopal Church near downtown, which is currently serving as a water station. The water convoy then went to other locations to drop off gallons of water.The delivery of 750 gallons of water to Detroit will not make even a minor dent in filling the void left by shutoffs impacting 17,000 households. But this symbolic water delivery helps illustrate the failure of the emergency management and the overall capitalist system in the U.S. in addressing a problem that is bound to worsen not only in this city but throughout the country and the world.‘Make the banks pay’The 11th Freedom Friday demonstration began July 25 outside the water department headquarters downtown on Randolph Street. After rallying for a half-hour, demonstrators marched to the Greek Town entertainment district where they held a street meeting outside the Wayne County Treasurer’s Office on Monroe Avenue.This target was selected since more than 40,000 tax foreclosures have taken place in the county this year. Money from the federal government turned over to the state of Michigan for the so-called “hardest hit” fund — which is ostensibly designed to assist distressed homeowners in working out terms of payment for mortgages and property taxes — is not being used for these purposes.Instead the resources that should be allocated to keep people in their homes are being appropriated to fund blight removal efforts in Detroit. The Detroit Blight Removal Task Force is headed by multibillionaire banker and business magnate Dan Gilbert. It is Gilbert and his business interests, among others, that are deciding the future economic landscape of the city of Detroit.After leaving the Greek Town district, the Freedom Friday protest moved to Campus Martius Park in the center of the financial district. Marchers walked around the park as an officially sanctioned party was being held to commemorate the 313th anniversary of Detroit’s “founding,” that is, the French occupation of Detroit.Demonstrators chanted “Make the banks pay!” and then marched past Chase Bank to City Hall where they held another brief rally.During the course of the march through the financial district, private security guards at Dan Gilbert’s corporations followed the group, lining up outside the banks and office buildings owned by the Quicken Loans chief who now owns over 60 buildings in the downtown area.On July 26, Workers World Party hosted a public forum on the water crisis from a revolutionary viewpoint.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Iowa workers resist attack on minimum wage

first_imgDes Moines, Iowa — A new Iowa law stripped away minimum-wage increases across the state the week of March 27 and set a dangerous precedent for Hawkeye State workers.For the first time in over 20 years, the Republican Party dominates the state government. GOP lawmakers have already succeeded in passing a number of damaging anti-worker laws in the first months of the 2017 legislative session.They introduced House File 295, a minimum-wage pre-emption law to roll back wage increases in Johnson, Linn, Polk and Wapello counties. HF 295 passed the Iowa Senate in a vote of 29 to 21 — with a unanimous vote from Republicans — and was signed into law by Gov. Terry Branstad.HF 295 marks the first time a state has rejected a minimum-wage increase already in effect. It also prevents future increases from taking place, eliminating local control from Iowa cities and counties. With the exception of Polk County, which was set to raise its minimum wage to $8.75 on April 1, three Iowa counties had already increased wage minimums: Johnson County to $10.10 an hour, Linn County to $8.25 and Wapello County to $8.20.Not only does the bill reverse these increases, it even allows businesses to lower wages.Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement organizer Bridget Fagan-Reidburn told WW, “We are outraged by our legislators’ continuous attack on workers — including lowering the minimum wage for close to 100,000 Iowa workers.”These wage increases are a necessary minimum given the rising costs of living, as noted by the Iowa Policy Project. The statewide minimum wage of $7.25, which falls short of a living wage according to IPP, has not been increased since 2008.Fagan-Reidburn said, “Because of the inaction at the Statehouse for the last nine years, supervisors in four counties saw the need in their communities and raised their local minimum wages.”For months, Republican lawmakers called HF 295 a priority piece of legislation. It was supported by the Association of Business and Industry, the Iowa Restaurant Association and the Grocers’ Association, all of which, of course, stand to profit from such exploitation.Despite their campaign rhetoric denouncing “big government,” the Iowa GOP supports big government when it furthers the interests of big business.Executive Director of the ­National Employment Law Project Christine Owens issued a statement on March 28 calling the Iowa Legislature’s decision “a new low in the callous, corporate-driven push to block living wages for the state’s lowest wage earners.”Iowa CCI, the Center for Worker Justice of Eastern Iowa, the Service Employees Union, the Iowa AFL-CIO and other groups are fighting against HF 295 and other anti-worker legislation.Fagan-Reidburn said, “We will continue to fight for a minimum-wage increase to $15 per hour for all Iowans. We knew this would be a long-term fight, and we’ll continue to hold our politicians responsible to put people before profits and big-moneyed corporations.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Pioneer Harvest Yield Check 10/15/14

first_imgKramer told HAT, while the harvest is on hold, growers should be checking fields to catch problems early, “Waiting is not an easy thing to do. What I would be doing is checking fields to see which crops may have some standability issues.  I might also look at which fields have ear molds.” He added that he has not seen a lot of ear mold, but this kind of weather is conducive to the problem. Facebook Twitter SHARE By Gary Truitt – Oct 16, 2014 Pioneer Harvest Yield Check 10/15/14 Pioneer Harvest Yield Check 10/15/14 SHARE Home News Feed Pioneer Harvest Yield Check 10/15/14 Heavy rain and high winds have put the harvest on hold in many areas of the state, and concern is mounting about how long the corn can stand. This summer’s cooler weather and lack of growing degree days has already caused problems with stalk rot. Fred Kramer, with DuPont Pioneer, says these late season rains are causing serious disease problems, “We have stalk rot, crown rot; and now with high winds, rain, and delays, it is going to make it that much more likely for problems down the road.” Kramer, who covers several counties in Central Indiana, says about a third of the corn and soybean crops have been harvested. As for yields, in Central Indiana the numbers look good, “The yields have been phenomenal, they may not be as high as everyone thought they were going to be, but they are very very good.”  Kramer he has seen many fields yield well above 250 bpa. He said many farms will have averages around 200 bpa. Facebook Twitter Soybean yields in Central Indiana are coming in at the high end of expectations, but poor drainage in some fields is cutting yields.  With about a third of the harvest complete, Fred Kramer, with DuPont Pioneer, says soybean yields are making growers smile, “The T series soybeans have been simply outstanding. I have some fields that are yielding in the 80bpa range and some down in the 50 bpa area.” He added drainage problems are the cause for the lower yields in some fields. This part of the state had some flooding issues earlier this year, and Kramer says too much moisture is hurting yields in some cases, “If we have wet spots, the yields are suffering; but, where we have good tile drainage, we are doing well.”Kramer said the variety that is performing the best in Boone, Tipton, and Clinton Counties is 33T72, “That is a new bean for us and is a 3.3 maturity and has just been doing very very well across a bunch of different environments.”    Previous articleField Drainage Hurting Soybean YieldsNext articleMorning Outlook Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Turkey tightens grip on social media platforms

first_img Help by sharing this information July 22, 2020 Turkey tightens grip on social media platforms April 28, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns an amendment to the law on Internet crimes that Turkey’s government has submitted to parliament with the aim of silencing mounting online criticism. The government’s goal is to control social media, the only remaining refuge for critical journalists in Turkey, RSF said. Receive email alerts TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Online freedomsMedia independence InternetFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit to go further Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law News Turkey has more than 37 million Facebook subscribers and 16 million Twitter subscribers, and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is keener than ever to tighten his legislative grip on these and other social media platforms after being undermined by a great deal of online criticism since the start of the coronavirus crisis.At his request, the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) submitted the bill to amend the law on Internet crimes to parliament on 21 July. This is a law that, since its adoption in 2007, the authorities have already massively exploited to silence online media by abusing provisions penalizing insults and threats to national security.The government now aims to force social media platforms to open an office in Turkey, comply with requests and decisions byTurkey’s courts, and pass on notifications from the Turkish authorities to their subscribers. Pressed by the president, parliament could vote on the bill this week, before the start of its summer break. The proposed 11-article amendment comes on the heels of one that has subjected digital media to control by the High Council for Broadcasting (RTÜK) since September 2019.Progressive sanctionsAKP vice-president Özlem Zengin announced on 21 July that the government’s aim is for each social media platform with more than 1 million connections a day to appoint a representative in Turkey with whom the Turkish authorities can resolve problems arising from cases of insults, intimidation andviolation of privacy.Claiming that France, Germany and the United States are trying to introduce similar legislations, Zengin said the aim was not to close down platforms. If they refuse to appoint a local representative, she said, they will be subjected to phased sanctions: an initial administrative fine of 10 million Turkish lira (1.3 million euros), then a fine of 30 million lira (3.9 million euros), then a ban on advertising and withdrawal of earnings, and finally, as a last resort, a reduction in bandwidth. Internet access providers would be required to implement this final sanction within four hours.The Turkish authorities also want these platforms to create a mechanism for responding within 48 hours to complaints about “violations of personal rights” or to judicial orders to remove content. If offending content is not removed, websites will be rendered inaccessible within four hours.Internet hosting service providers that fail to inform the persons concerned about the Turkish authorities’ requests could be given an administrative fine ranging from 1 million lira (130,000 euros) to 10 million lira (1.3 million euros).“After being politically weakened, it is deplorable that the sole response President Erdogan has found is to nationalize the management of international digital platforms in order to silencethe fierce criticism he has been receiving on the Internet – the only refuge left for outspoken journalists,” RSF Turkey representative Erol Onderoglu said.“Subjecting these platforms to the control of courts that are under the president’s thumb will close the small window through which many online journalists are still just about managing to breathe. It is clear that such control aims to silence the growingpolitical unrest and will impact on the flow of critical and independent information, which is primordial in a polarizedsociety.”Reaction against Twitter?The president had nothing to say when the army of trolls controlled by his party waged intimidation and disinformation campaigns against his critics, including journalists of various political tendencies. In June, Twitter closed 7,340 accounts controlled by AKP trolls that had executed a total of 37 million shares, including 1.7 million (tweets, retweets, etc.) involving Erdogan. While carrying out a series of reforms last April that included the early release of 100,000 detainees as an anti-coronavirus measure, the government tried to introduce an amendment that would have ended the right to online anonymity on the declared grounds combatting “violations of privacy” on social media platforms.Withdrawn at the last moment, it has resurfaced now following the irresponsible sharing of tweets insulting Erdogan’s son-in-law, finance minister Berat Albayrak, after he announced that his wife, Esra Albayrak (the president’s daughter), had given birth to their fourth child. Erdogan’s aides blocked comments on his account just as thousands of young people were expressing disagreement with his comments, and as the hashtag #OyMoyYok (We won’t vote for you) was leading Twitter trends.“You understand now why we oppose these social media,” Erdogan said in 1 July. “This nation and this country do not deserve this treatment. This is why we want to address this issue as quickly as possible in parliament and suppress all these platforms.”War against independent informationThe government also wields direct control over many judges, who censor scores of online articles without giving any reason. In mid-February, one of these judges ordered the blocking of 232 articles that had been published online by news sites and other media outlets including Cumhuriyet, Bianet, Diken, BirGün, Artı Gerçek, Gazete Duvar, T24, Odatv, Sputnik Türkiye, Evrensel, Halk TV, Tele1 and Gerçek Gündem.They all referred to the finance minister’s purchase of land in Eastern Thrace (Turkey’s westernmost region) through which the government plans to dig a canal linking the Black Sea andthe Sea of Marmara.According to the news website Bianet, RSF’s partner in Turkey, 586 online articles and nine social media accounts were rendered inaccessible by the Turkish courts in 2019 in the course of “the Turkish government’s war against independent information online.”In March 2019, RSF reported that in 2018 the courts had blocked access to at least 2,950 articles and journalistic content items, including stories about political corruption, clientelism, human rights violations and exploitation or workers, and that an unknown number of content blockings were carried out without references to the courts. The Turkish authorities also had no qualms about blocking all access to the online encyclopaedia Wikipedia from April 2017 to January 2020 because of content accusing them of complicity with Islamic State.Turkey is ranked 154th out of 180 countries and territories in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editorcenter_img RSF_en News Crédit : Pixelkult / Pixabay News News TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Online freedomsMedia independence InternetFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment Organisation Follow the news on Turkey April 2, 2021 Find out more April 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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CybelAngel Reveals How Cybercriminals Target Healthcare Sector

first_img Twitter WhatsApp Local News Pinterest Twitter Facebook PARIS & NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 24, 2021– CybelAngel, a global leader in digital risk protection, today published in-depth original research revealing how cybercriminals plan healthcare-related fraud, ransomware and other attacks by obtaining stolen credentials, leaked database files and other materials from specialized sources in the cybercrime underground. In their new paper, “ Healthcare Data Actively Targeted and Sold on the Dark Web,” CybelAngel analysts describe how the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic’s strain on hospitals, coupled with the healthcare industry’s porous cybersecurity defenses, give criminals ample ability and resources to methodically launch lucrative intrusions jeopardizing patient safety. “Cybercrime attacks that disable hospitals and weaponize stolen medical records are unconscionable – and particularly ruthless during a pandemic, when the uptime of every care facility and accuracy of every health record determines whether lives are saved,” said Camille Charaudeau, Vice President of Product Strategy at CybelAngel. “While the volume and stakes of these attacks can feel overwhelming, our research shows that sealing off a few specific types of exposed data could have a meaningful effect by disrupting the supply chains adversaries rely on to execute these attacks.” To better understand threats to healthcare facilities, CybelAngel researchers tracked bad actors targeting French hospitals, the criminals’ methods and perceived gains. Available here, the research includes in-depth analysis with attackers conversations and security recommendations. Key findings include:Open databases mean hospitals often leak the data used against them: In underground forums, CybelAngel observes savvy brokers amassing lists of open, exposed databases inside healthcare organizations, which they seek to monetize by selling to attackers and other parties. Exposed databases can lie in on-premises servers and connected specialty equipment, or exist in SaaS or other cloud-based platforms where misconfigurations or poor access controls leave data and network inroads visible.Attackers combine credential-stuffing with third-party access to beat detection: The ongoing SolarWinds breach response is a reminder that privileged third-party software and partners are effective ways to bypass victims’ otherwise rigorous security controls. The same holds true for healthcare sector threats. CybelAngel’s research includes screenshots and detail of reputedly well-connected actors selling a file containing thousands of employee credentials from “a company that works with many (if not all) hospitals.” Many breaches and ransomware attacks are traced back to compromises of third-parties the healthcare sector relies on for software, tech support, billing, and data reporting. It only takes victimizing one service provider to access or ransom many of their downstream customers.Sharing medical records comes at the cost of control: The proliferation of cheap network-attached storage and other high-capacity devices means that both authorized and hidden, shadow IT systems alike are discoverable by bad actors and leave millions of sensitive health records in the public domain. A common example in CybelAngel’s latest research is a vetted actor’s offering “500,000 French hospital records” on an underground marketplace. CybelAngel examined disclosed portions of the records and assesses them to be likely authentic. While not referencing COVID-19, the stolen records list personally identifiable information (PII) for patients and their relationships with specific physicians, nurses and pharmacies, making the cache potentially useful for fraud or refining social-engineering themes used for phishing and ransomware. CybelAngel is the only Digital Risk Protection Platform comprehensively monitoring for data leaks across every layer of the Web, including the billions of exposed internet-connected devices that exist outside organizations’ defended perimeters. CybelAngel’s AI-powered platform and analyst team additionally study underground activity to identify credible threats to customers and inform the wider security community. Practical, urgent security recommendations in today’s research include:Maintain a focus on employee awareness: Beyond taking care to recognize and avoid personal security threats, like phishing emails and transferring sensitive data to unapproved devices, every employee plays a crucial role in making sure their team’s moves in fast-paced healthcare environments do not inadvertently break security controls and compliance policies.Maximize patching and encryption defenses: CybelAngel researchers conclude that unpatched software susceptible to years-old exploits remains a massive segment of healthcare’s attack surface. Just as worrisome is a clear, widespread failure to activate built-in encryption features on software, collaboration and device platforms. Encrypted data is useless to attackers, yet this powerful defense is unutilized when systems are misconfigured or have unclear ownership.Monitor necessary but risky remote connections: Healthcare rely on remote connections, but incomplete asset discovery and inventories raise the risk of abuse of privileges and widespread compromise if only one device or department is compromised. When remote desktop protocol (RDP) and VPN access is required, it is imperative to ensure all enhanced security settings are enabled and monitor Internet traffic to look for signs of abuse, like anomalous large-scale data exfiltration. Follow CybelAngel for the latest details on research, events and other news.Twitter: @CybelAngelLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cybelangel/ About CybelAngel CybelAngel is the world-leading digital risk protection platform that detects and resolves external threats before these wreak havoc. Because more data is being shared, processed or stored outside the firewall on cloud services, open databases and connected devices, the digital risk to enterprises has never been greater. Organizations worldwide rely on CybelAngel to discover, monitor and resolve external threats across all layers of the Internet, keeping their critical assets, brand and reputation secure. To learn more, visit CybelAngel.com. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210224005385/en/ CONTACT: Media Contact: Carrie VanBuskirk W2 Communications [email protected] 571-247-1133 KEYWORD: EUROPE UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA FRANCE NEW YORK INDUSTRY KEYWORD: SECURITY DATA MANAGEMENT OTHER HEALTH TECHNOLOGY PRACTICE MANAGEMENT MANAGED CARE GENERAL HEALTH HOSPITALS OTHER TECHNOLOGY TELECOMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE NETWORKS INTERNET HEALTH MOBILE/WIRELESS SOURCE: CybelAngel Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/24/2021 03:00 AM/DISC: 02/24/2021 03:01 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210224005385/en By Digital AIM Web Support – March 4, 2021 center_img CybelAngel Reveals How Cybercriminals Target Healthcare Sector WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook TAGS  Previous articleHundreds protest coup in Myanmar as resistance spreadsNext articleAgroaceite is Certified for 97.3% of Its Commitment to Good Manufacturing Practices Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

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Whooping cranes arrive in Pike County

first_img By The Penny Hoarder You Might Like Art leaders reflect on ‘spectacular year’ Pike County had an outstanding year for the arts in 2013. The Pike County Year of the Arts 2013 was… read more The Whooping cranes of Operation Migration 2013 arrived in Pike County Thursday.If weather conditions are favorable, plans are for the ultralight aircraft to take flight at sunup today with the cranes following close behind.The Whooping cranes reached Pike County earlier than expected. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Skip “We are expecting light winds on the surface but the wind direction aloft could be a problem,” she said. “If conditions are right, we should get in the air at sunup which is just before 7.”If Operation Migration flight is a go, Condi offered no encouragement for viewing the liftoff.“We don’t know how the cranes will come out of the pen,” she said. “We have a flight plan but it’s not always the one they have.”Condi said there are four planned stops before the Whooping cranes reach their destination at St. Mark’s National Wildlife Reserve in the Florida Panhandle. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Email the author The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Liz Condi, Operation Migration director of communications, said that good flying conditions made it possible to make a few extra miles and skip Stop 18 in Lowndes County.“Unfortunately, due to our location in Pike County, we aren’t able to offer a public departure flyover site,” Condi said. “There is no good line of sight or parking area in the vicinity.”Condi said the Operation Migration team is hoping for fair weather and a lift off today. Latest Stories Whooping cranes arrive in Pike County Once at St. Mark’s, they will be held over in a closed area where they will be kept away from all things human.“We want to keep them as wild as possible for when they return to their summer home in Wisconsin,” Condi said.Operation Migration, which has played a lead role in the reintroduction of endangered Whooping cranes into eastern North American since 2001, took flight from The White River Marsh training site in Green Lake County, Wisconsin on Oct. 2, 2013.When they reach St. Mark’s, their flight will have taken them 1,285 miles over seven states. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Sponsored Content By Jaine Treadwell Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Print Article Published 11:00 pm Thursday, December 26, 2013last_img read more

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The chemical basis for the electrical stratigraphy of ice

first_imgAntarctic and Greenland ice core samples were studied using two different stratigraphic electrical techniques. The electrical conductivity measurement (ECM) technique is a dc method, while dielectric profiling (DEP) is an ac method. It was found that ECM responds only to acid, even in large excess of neutral salt concentrations. DEP responds to both acid and salt content of the ice. Acids may be giving rise to conduction through an increase in the number of ionisation defects, or through a network of liquid veins between ice grains. Salts on the other hand appear to give rise to Bjerrum defects, which are bound charges and cannot provide a dc current, but do produce a dielectric ac conductivity. The two methods can be used together to give a rapid prediction of both acid and salt content of cores. This may be of particular use in Wisconsin-age ice from Greenland, but can generally be used to define parts of cores worthy of detailed chemical study.last_img read more

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