Exclusive: New technology in Florida school could be lifesaving in active shooter incidents, police say

first_imgurfinguss/iStockBy STEPHANIE WASH, ABC News(CORAL SPRINGS, Fla.) — When Florida students return to school next year, there will be a new safety measure in place thanks to a bill signed by Gov. Ron DeSantis last June. Alyssa’s Law, named after 14-year-old Alyssa Alhadeff, a victim of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, requires all Florida public and charter schools to implement a mobile system that silently alerts law enforcement and first responders of potentially life-threatening situations — from shootings to medical emergencies.But one Florida school is ahead of the pack. Coral Springs Charter School installed and began testing a panic alert system in February before the spread of the novel coronavirus. ABC News saw the system in action before the pandemic with assistance from Andrew Pollack, whose daughter Meadow, 18, was also killed in the Parkland shooting.It’s been more than two years since a grieving and angry Pollack told President Donald Trump at a White House meeting, “There should’ve been one school shooting and we should’ve fixed it.”Now, Pollack said he hopes the launch of his new program, School Safety Grant, and the implementation of ALERT, or Active Law Enforcement Response Technology, will be one fix when gun laws fail.The “School Safety Grant,” Pollack says, will help fund school safety enhancement nationwide by distributing grants. Police departments will be awarded up to $40,000 and $20,000 per campus for school districts.But it’s not just schools, says Lee Mandel, CEO of IntraLogic Solutions. Hospitals, movie theaters, houses of worship and other mass-gathering locations will be eligible. The grants will cover the “full implementation, full deployment and all the software for life,” says Mandel.IntraLogic Solutions, along with the other School Safety Grant partners, Actuate and SaferWatch, are initially donating up to $20 million worth of software licenses and deployment services that will allow grant recipients to use their existing infrastructure to connect them to their local police departments.ALERT gives police access to real-time surveillance cameras within a building once a panic button is hit during an active incident or a button is hit on a phone application.Dispatchers can then identify and track a suspect’s location, and relay crucial information to officers as they respond.“When they arrive on the scene, they know exactly where to go, how to get in, where the shooter is,” Mandel told ABC News. Mandel began developing the ALERT software after 26 people, including 20 children, were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012.“It really hit home,” Mandel said. “And we said, ‘How can we make a difference?’”Mandel said he met Pollack shortly after the Parkland shooting that killed 17 and injured 17 others. Since his daughter’s death, Pollack has been involved in legislative efforts, including the signing of the School Safety Bill in Florida, that in part raised the minimum age to buy a firearm from 18 to 21, banned bump stocks and imposed a three-day waiting period to purchase a gun.“For me, it’s always been about school safety,” Pollack said. “I don’t want to debate about anything else.”“If this type of software was in place … she’d be alive today,” Pollack said.“There were so many miscommunications, human errors, people not trained properly,” he continued. “This makes police departments efficient. It takes them into the 21st century of response.”Identifying and solving the problemsCoral Springs police were the first to enter Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School the day of the shooting. The department is the first in the nation to receive ALERT.“[Marjory Stoneman Douglas] had a good camera system, but the department didn’t have access,” Coral Springs Police Chief Clyde Parry told ABC News. “Without us being able to tie in and look at the cameras, it obviously hampered our response in that situation.” He noted that at one point information was delayed by as much as 20 minutes and officers believed the shooter was on the third floor when in reality he had left the building.Another problem, Parry said, was the fire alarm. “It was hard for some of the students to hear … any announcements over the intercom,” he said.“We’re going to look at being able to disable the fire alarm remotely so that now we can give clear directions, ‘A code red has been called — enter your classroom, lock yourself down,’ you know, so that those things, you know, can’t happen again.”“We looked under every rock, we turned every leaf over,” Parry said. “It’s important to go through them thoroughly, vet them and find out what did I do good. What did I do bad? What can I fix for the next time?”Coral Springs police has begun working toward interoperability between fire departments and the sheriff’s office. They have also established mutual aid agreements with the jurisdictions around them so that they are able to respond to events if they are within striking distance.As for the ALERT technology, “It’s life changing,” Parry said. “It’s taking us from being in a rowboat to being in a starship.”Parry told ABC News that information given during 911 calls can often be unhelpful if the caller is under stress and shock.“With this technology, it allows us to be able to have well-trained people give defined answers and directions of where to travel, exactly where the problem is,” he said. “If you have a camera and I’m looking for somebody who’s wearing black pants in a maroon shirt … you can do that. You can give a direction of travel. You can tell them which area to enter the school. More importantly, which area not to enter the school, [like] if we see that somebody is maybe set up in a sniper situation.”“In some instances I imagine it will go faster than even receiving our first 911 call,” Parry said. “In any emergency, where seconds matter … this is technology that is going to trim off as many seconds as you can.”Although this technology is a step forward, those on the receiving end are confident it is not an end-all, be-all solution.“Shooters are constantly evolving and are constantly learning,” Parry said. “You can never rest on your laurels.’”“But it will bring school safety to a different level than what we have right now. And I am excited about it. I look forward to it. And I’m embracing it,” Parry added.Coral Springs Charter School, located just two miles from Marjory Stoneman Douglas, is also a grant recipient.“When it’s literally down the street from you, I think that has much more of a significant emotional impact,” Principal Gary Springer told ABC News. “Parkland is not just our neighbor. They’re literally a family member.”Springer’s school sits on a 200,000-square-foot campus, and houses 1,700 students from grades 6 to 12 and 150 faculty members.“I think it’s really crucial that we’re able to have the latest and greatest technology … at our fingertips,” Springer told ABC News. “For our first responders to have instant access into our building and a bird’s-eye view … into what’s going on at our school at any time during the day, I welcome that.”The school has upward of 100 cameras throughout the building.“This provides immediate response in order for the situation to be controlled at a greater rate,” he said. “The school now has the ability to automatically set off the panic alert and that’ll shut down the school. And what that’ll do is immediately alert first responders upon arriving on the scene. They will already have access to a full picture of the school, which includes an overlay of the entire footprint of the school that allow someone to communicate with first responders and automatically unlock the doors that are on lockdown.”ALERT demonstrationABC News was there in February as Coral Springs police used ALERT for the first time at Coral Springs Charter School.Officers were prepped beforehand by Coral Springs Director of Emergency Management Alex Falcone. The drill began when Coral Springs Police Department communication center manager Kathy Liriano received an alert that a panic button was hit at the school. Liriano immediately alerted police, then took over the school’s PA system to address the shooter.“Police are on scene. Shooter, drop your weapon,” Liriano said.“Once they start talking over the intercom, the shooter may realize, ‘All right, the police are here,’ and they may abandon what they’re doing and try and escape or … shoot themselves. We know that a lot of these active killers have [died by] suicide once the police show up,” Parry said.Liriano then relays crucial information to officers, including the race of the suspect and their clothing. With the school on lockdown, she is able to unlock the door for police.And as officers rush to the scene, the dispatcher continues to track the shooter in order to give police step-by-step directions to locate and apprehend the shooter upon their arrival.On the first drill, Coral Springs police apprehended the shooter in less than four minutes.The officers then conducted a second drill in which the shooter entered the school and moved at random.“What we’re really going to try to test with this is how quickly we can guide officers through the hallways. We’re going to test using a lot of different cameras. We’re gonna test using all of the features that the system has to offer,” Falcone told ABC News correspondent Victor Oquendo. “They’re going to have to search the school and they’re gonna have to rely on the information provided to us from the software in order for them to find them.”But a few minutes into the drill, Liriano selected a button that opened up nearly 300 camera views at once.“We’ll disable that button so you can’t accidentally click 10 cameras at the same time, because otherwise you’re going to have too much on the screen,” Mandel told Liriano.“This is an excellent opportunity for us, so we want to make sure that we drill and we drill hard because if we can identify issues now on a safe day in a controlled environment, we can fix that,” Falcone said.They then elected to restart with a new drill. This time officers apprehended the shooter just one minute after entering the building.Mandel says the purpose of the drill was to locate additional features and challenges of the software to make it efficient and effective for users. Following the drill, the company removed the feature.After the drill, 15-year veteran Coral Springs Officer Robert Cherry is impressed, calling ALERT an incredible tool.“It gives us a huge advantage to know exactly where the suspect is at any given moment and a school of this size, you never know where they can be,” Cherry said.Cherry was a first responder to the Parkland shooting.“It’s invaluable to have if, God forbid, there’s another incident like that,” Cherry said about the software.For that reason, Pollack said he hopes this technology expands nationwide and is the future of responding.“In my head,” he said, “my daughter will be saying, ‘Well, look what we did now, Daddy.’”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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The genius of Dr Allinson

first_imgHow do you transform obese folk into “ordinary” people? It’s obvious, duh! Make them run a half marathon every day. If only Dr Allinson had made his suggestion more forcefully a century ago…On fighting the flab: “Exercise must be taken daily; four or five miles a day to begin with, not necessarily all at once, increased until 10 or 12 miles can easily be taken. These are the rules that must be carried out if obese persons want to become like ordinary citizens, and not live like animated flour barrels.”Next week: cold turkeylast_img

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Euphorium Bakery opens in Tesco

first_imgEuphorium Bakery has opened its latest café and in-store bakery in one of Tesco’s supermarkets, British Baker can reveal.The new pilot concession outlet, which opened last month, is based in the supermarket business’ Kensington store on West Cromwell Road.It is made up of a large café operation catering for more than 100 covers, as well as an in-store bakery, which produces a range of artisanal style breads and can be purchased from either Euphorium’s outlet or from Tesco’s checkout tills.Andrew Green, operations director at Euphorium Bakery, told British Baker: “The outlet is no different to any of our other locations, with our staff baking in the store and supplying a full product range, as well as other products coming from our manufacturing facility in Islington.”He added that a roll-out of this store format would be dependent on the success of the Tesco pilot outlet, which will be trialling over the next few months.The move comes five months after Tesco secured a 49% stake in artisanal coffee shop business Harris + Hoole, a concept thought up by Australian siblings Nick, Andrew and Laura Tolley, who also operate Taylor Street Baristas.In a recent blog post, Philip Clarke, chief executive of Tesco, said: “We will back businesses in which we see an opportunity for their brands to grow with ours. Euphorium bakery is another example: an established brand and business, with a compelling offer, it is already in a store in Kensington, offering amazing breads, pastries and sandwiches. It makes what is already a terrific store even better for customers. We’re proud of it and I hope our customers will love it too.”A spokesperson from Tesco told British Baker the company was unable to comment on the new Euphorium Bakery outlet.In March 2012, Euphorium Bakery announced that it would be investing £1m in its new Islington-based factory and shop during the summer, and planned to open a further 20 shops.last_img read more

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The String Cheese Incident Fights Through The Rain At The Après In Aspen

first_imgOn Saturday, The String Cheese Incident played their second show of the weekend at Aspen, CO’s inaugural The Après, a new festival in collaboration with the area’s renowned live music venue, Belly Up Aspen. The night prior, the sextet offered up an electric two-set performance at the Belly Up.Following a brief weather delay, The String Cheese Incident opened up their first set with “Manga”, a fairly new tune that was inspired by legendary Cameroonian bassist Andre Manga and debuted last summer at Electric Forest. The band moved forward with an exploratory take on “Texas”, highlighted by some explosive work from Michael Kang on his electric mandolin. Following a brief pause, Kang picked up his fiddle as the sextet moved forward with “Valley Of The Jig”. Michael Travis and Jason Hann set the tone with a tight trancey rhythm behind their kits, allowing keyboardist Kyle Hollingsworth to send the jam into a spacey realm, as he messed around with his synth. A tender take on “Barstool” came next, followed by “Illegal” and a roaring “It Is What It Is”. The String Cheese Incident brought their first set to a close with the Hollingsworth-led “Colliding”.Following a brief setbreak, The String Cheese Incident returned to open up their second set with “So Far From Home”. Bill Nershi offered up some nice work on the acoustic guitar, along with some funky interplay out of Hollingsworth’s corner. With Keith Moseley laying down a meaty groove on the bass, the band moved forward with “Sirens”, giving Kang a chance to fire off a scorching solo. Fighting through the cold rain, SCI continued with “One Step Closer”, “Bhangra Saanj”, and a crowd-pleasing rendition of “Shantytown”. “Shantytown” made way for a “Drums” segment before the band closed out their second set with “Let’s Go Outside”.Tonight, The String Cheese Incident returns to The Après in Aspen, CO for their final performance of the weekend.The String Cheese Incident’s 25th-anniversary schedule will continue with a two-night stand at The Fox Theatre in St. Louis, MO on April 19th and 20th. From there, the band will head down to the Big Easy during the second weekend of New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival for a trio of special performances including a show at The Orpheum on May 2nd and a pair of shows at Mardi Gras World with support from Pigeons Playing Ping Pong on May 3rd and 4th.The band will continue with a performance at Cumberland, MD’s DelFest on May 24th, followed by a three-night run at The Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY on May 25th, 26th, and 27th. SCI will also make summer festival appearances at Electric Forest, The Peach Music Festival, and FloydFest, as well as a four-night Independence Day run, and their annual three-night homecoming run at Morrison, CO’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre on July 19th, 20th, and 21st.For ticketing information and a full list of The String Cheese Incident’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.Setlist: The String Cheese Incident | The Après | Aspen, CO | 4/6/2019Set One: Manga, Texas, Vally Of The Jig, Barstool, Illegal > It Is What It Is, CollidingSet Two: So Far From Home > Sirens > One Step Closer > Bhangra Saanj, Shantytown > Drums > Let’s Go Outsidelast_img read more

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University announces two new vice presidents

first_imgThe University announced it named Doug Marsh and David Bailey as vice presidents Jan. 5. Marsh, a South Bend native and a 1982 Notre Dame graduate, was promoted to vice president for facilities design and operations. Bailey, a 1983 Notre Dame graduate, was promoted to vice president for strategic planning and institutional research.As vice president for facilities design and operations, Marsh will be the university architect. For more than two decades, he has led planning, design and construction at Notre Dame, in addition to overseeing the University’s utilities and maintenance team. Bailey began his career on campus in 2011. Since 2012, he has led the Office of Strategic Planning and Institutional Research. Previously he worked at IBM Corp., Gerard Klauer Mattison & Co and Goldman Sachs. After these promotions, Notre Dame now has 18 vice presidents, in addition to executive vice president John Affleck-Graves. Tags: David Bailey, Doug Marsh, John Affleck-Graveslast_img read more

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Terry Kinney to Direct Miller’s The Price on B’way

first_img Arthur Miller’s The Price Related Shows Terry Kinney(Photo courtesy of Polk & Co.) The 2016-17 Great White Way season is shaping up! Terry Kinney, the co‐founder of Steppenwolf, will helm a new Broadway production of Arthur Miller’s The Price. The Roundabout production is scheduled to begin performances on February 16, 2017 and will officially open on March 16 at the American Airlines Theatre. The limited engagement is set to end on May 7.When the Great Depression cost his family their fortune, Victor Franz gave up his dream of an education to support his father. Three decades later, Victor has returned to his childhood home to sell the remainder of his parents’ estate. His wife, his estranged brother, and the wily furniture dealer hired to appraise their possessions all arrive with their own agendas, forcing Victor to confront a question, long‐stifled, about the value of his sacrifice.This will be the fifth Broadway production of The Price; it was last seen on the Main Stem in 1999, with Jeffrey DeMunn as Victor.The cast and design team will be announced later.center_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on May 14, 2017last_img read more

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Award-winning author Andre Dubus III will speak at Southern Vermont College commencement

first_imgAward-winning author Andre Dubus III will be awarded an Honorary Degree from Southern Vermont College and will address the graduating class on Sunday, May 17, for the school s 82nd commencement. Dubus is the author of House of Sand and Fog (a Finalist for the National Book Award and an Oprah s Book Club selection which was made into a major motion picture), Bluesman and The Cage Keeper and Other Stories. His most recent and widely acclaimed novel, The Garden of Last Days, dramatically weaves a tale about the intertwining lives of several characters leading up to 9/11. Andre Dubus III is a gifted writer and an inspiring speaker who has earned acclaim for his innovative narrative lines and for his rich character portraits, said SVC Provost Albert DeCiccio. His work has added a new dimension to discussions about the importance of understanding others in order to prevent turmoil both domestic and international. SVC is thrilled to host this talented writer to address our graduates, because, above all else, Andre values the imaginative potential of our nation s youth.Dubus has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, The National Magazine Award for fiction, The Pushcart Prize, and was a Finalist for the Prix de Rome Fellowship from the Academy of Arts and Letters. A member of PEN American Center and the Executive Board of PEN New England, Dubus has served as a panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts and has taught writing at Harvard University, Tufts University, the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and Emerson College.Andre Dubus III, who lives with his family north of Boston, is the son of the late Andre Dubus, the author of many short stories and nonfiction vignettes, including Dancing After Hours and Meditations from a Movable Chair.Founded in 1926, Southern Vermont College offers a career-enhancing, liberal arts education with 21 academic degree programs for approximately 500 students. Southern Vermont College recognizes the importance of educating students for the workplace of the twenty-first century and for lives as successful leaders in their communities. The college is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.Source: SVClast_img read more

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Pat Keller Makes First Descent of Linville Falls

first_imgPat Keller, 24, boldly made the first descent of Linville Falls last Tuesday, August 24, 2010. The triple-tiered waterfall has been eyed by many experienced kayakers over the years, but the intimidating upper drop had been, until now, thought to be un-runnable. During Keller’s descent the upper waterfall (partially obscured in photo) proved to be the most difficult and nearly ended with disastrous consequences. Here’s Pat’s description of the descent:In the entrance slide, i thought to myself, “You’ve wanted to do this you’re whole life, you better get it right.”I boofed into the chasm and caught the set up eddy. No time for any thoughts but good ones.Peeling out of the pocket, i wanted to stay as low as possible, so i could generate enough drive to get the ramp i wanted. Taking my boof stroke, i knew i wasnt going fast enough. I yanked on my Right blade of my Werner as hard as i could, but my boat still turned and pointed down, launching me into the protrusion off the wall. My bow pitoned into the wall with a huge slam, turning my boat to the Left in the crack. My Nomad 8.5 had the rocker to allow the bow to shank off without sticking, but my Right elbow and wrist slammed down on the same protrusion that caught my bow, popping my paddle out of both hands. As my brain was processing this new BIG problem, the death cave went by on my left side. No time to reach out and grab for it, possibly knocking me off balance. With determination but in a calm state of consciousness, i hand-backferried into the safety eddy on river Left, between Jones and Murf. Both were ready with ropes in hand, about to release if i were to miss a beat. I smiled at both of them, giving them the thumbs up – big hit but im ok. Five seconds later, my paddle floated past the cave and directly into my hands. It was like a dream.Not waisting any time, i grabbed excalibur from the waters, smiled at the Billys through my mouthguard and started paddling for the big falls.Lining up just Right of Center, i paddled in to this unreal view of the horizon line. Just past my big red bow, the explosion came into view and i was at damn near the perfect angle. Boofing as hard as i could, i got my bow out and past the nasty part of the bounce and to my amazement, my brand new shiny kayak combined with the angle of landing and the angle of the rock underneath me – gave me the most spectacular bounce i’ve ever felt. Up until this point, i was expecting to get bucked over the bars, but visualized the clean line anyway. Soaring out away from the explosion and past the horrible second shelf, i was extatic. I knew that i was going to land flat and it would be a huge hit, so i slammed my upper body forward to try not to let my spine stack up – thus breaking my back.Weight forward, a little heavy on my left edge, time slowed to a near standstill. I was watching the far wall go up and up and up, waiting for the hit that i knew was coming. An extra mental two count went by beyond what i was expecting (a testament to the bounce, and the size of the drop itself) and BOOOOOM! Pat Keller Dropping Linville FallsLanding on my Left edge allowed the surface area of my kayak to slow my landing by about 2 feet, as opposed to the approx 6 inches that my boat would’ve gone into the water, had i landed dead flat and balanced. Although the hit was large, and my ribs were a bit bruised from the water’s impact, i was stoked.As stoked as Keller and many others in the outdoor sports community of Western North Carolina were when first hearing of his descent of Linville Falls, the National Park Service isn’t feeling the same way. Keller’s descent violated several laws and he has been charged with multiple misdemeanors, all of which, if convicted, could result in up to $5000.00 fines and the possibility of jail time for Keller.For Pat’s take on the story, click to http://www.teamdagger.com/profiles/blogs/the-day-of-a-lifetimelast_img read more

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Compliance: Joint accounts and share insurance coverage

first_imgShare insurance coverage, as a general rule, extends National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund coverage to only credit union members. However, within the Federal Credit Union Act, there are some exceptions to the general rule.Those include interest on lawyer trust accounts, retirement and other benefit accounts and “qualifying joint accounts.”Several questions have been raised to CUNA’s compliance staff lately about what counts as a qualifying joint account for purposes of the exception.A qualifying joint account is a joint account in which:Each of the co-owners has personally signed a membership or account signature card (this does not apply to share certificate accounts); andEach member has a right to withdrawal on the same basis as the other co-owners.For share insurance purposes, a joint account that does not meet these requirements must be treated as owned by the named persons as individuals. The actual ownership interest of each person will be added to any additional accounts they own individually at the credit union. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Woman, 26, Killed in North Valley Stream Crash, Cops Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 26-year-old woman was killed Tuesday in a one-car crash in North Valley Stream, Nassau County police said. The woman, whose identity was not released pending notification of next of kin, was driving a 2005 Chrysler east on Dutch Broadway at Valpark Avenue around midnight when she struck a light pole and then crashed into tree, police said. First responders with Nassau police’s Emergency Services Unit and the Elmont Fire Department extracted the woman from the car using a hydraulic machine meant to pry apart wreckage. The victim was transported to Franklin General Hospital, where she was pronounced dead at 12:51 a.m., police said.Police did not say what caused the crash. The investigation is ongoing.last_img read more

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