David Bloom named Andrew Carnegie Fellow

first_img Read Full Story David Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is one of 32 inaugural Andrew Carnegie Fellows, the Carnegie Corporation of New York announced on April 22, 2015. Recipients of the new annual fellowship supporting scholars in the social sciences and humanities will receive up to $200,000 each, which will enable them to devote between one and two years to research and writing. The anticipated result of each fellowship is a book or major study.Fellows were chosen from among more than 300 people nominated by leaders from universities, think tanks, publishing, independent scholars, and nonprofit organizations nationwide.Bloom is an economist whose work focuses on health, demography, education, and labor. In recent years, he has written extensively on aging populations and on the links among health status, population dynamics, and economic growth.In an interview with The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Bloom called the award “the greatest gift you can give an academic, which is time.”last_img read more

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Broadway Grosses: Those Mormon Boys Show No Signs of Slowing Down

first_imgThat’s a lot of “hello”s! The Book of Mormon continues to bring in Broadway audiences, reaching a capacity of 102.6% for the eleventh consecutive week. That’s a consistent 8,528 sitting and 224 standing audience members every week. The Tony-winning musical joined perennial box office hits The Lion King, Wicked, Aladdin and Beautiful: The Carole King Musical in the top five grossing shows. Andrew Rannells kicked off performances in Hedwig and the Angry Inch on August 20, with fans eager to catch his first week in the wig and fishnets at 87.60% capacity. The newest addition to the Great White Way, Kenneth Lonergan’s This Is Our Youth, had a quiet first week with seven preview performances; we expect numbers to grow as buzz develops. Meanwhile, two tuners that posted closing notices earlier this summer, Newsies and Bullets Over Broadway, took their final bow this past Sunday. Here’s a look at who was on top—and who was not—for the week ending August 24: FRONTRUNNERS (By Capacity) 1. The Book of Mormon (102.63%) 2. A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder (101.05%) 3. The Lion King (100.06%) 4. Matilda (99.97%) 5. Aladdin (99.95%) Source: The Broadway League View Comments UNDERDOGS (By Capacity) 5. Rock of Ages (78.60%) 4. This is Our Youth (77.72%)** 3. Bullets Over Broadway (68.98%) 2. Once (66.32%) 1. Cinderella (59.29%) *Number based on seven regular performances **Number based on seven preview performances UNDERDOGS (By Gross) 5. Chicago ($569,511) 4. Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill ($511,741)* 3. Once ($425,535) 2. This is Our Youth ($365,614)** 1. Rock of Ages ($315,426) FRONTRUNNERS (By Gross) 1. The Lion King ($1,955,396) 2. Wicked ($1,795,268) 3. The Book of Mormon ($1,606,698) 4. Aladdin ($1,512,983) 5. Beautiful: The Carole King Musical ($1,282,410)last_img read more

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Glenn Close Revisits Sunset, Kit Harington Takes the Stage & More in the London Datebook

first_imgGlenn Close & Kit Harington(Photo: Richard Hubert Smith) Star Files A Broadway legend recreates her stage role as a screen legend of a bygone era in the same month that sees a fresh West End revival of what is widely considered the first great Broadway musical. Plus, several hefty new British plays and a meaty revival that brings TV’s Jon Snow back to the stage. For more on these and other theatrical enticements read on.APRIL 4-10With One (More) Look: Glenn Close returns to her signature stage role when the three-time Tony-winner opens April 4 at the Coliseum as the fading silent film icon Norma Desmond in Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Sunset Boulevard, a role she first played more than two decades ago in Los Angeles and then on Broadway. Michael Xavier is her Joe Gillis. Lonny Price directs at the same venue where he staged Emma Thompson and Bryn Terfel in Sweeney Todd last year.ALSO: The brilliant Timothy Spall, father of actor Rafe Spall and veteran of many Mike Leigh films, takes the leading role in Matthew Warchus’ revival of Harold Pinter’s The Caretaker, opening April 6 at the Old Vic. Daniel Mays and George MacKay complete the cast. Oscar and Tony nominee Stephen Rea stars at the Royal Court Jerwood Theatre Upstairs in Cyprus Avenue. David Ireland’s play, co-produced with Dublin’s Abbey Theatre, opens April 7 and is directed by Vicky Featherstone, who runs the Court.APRIL 11-17Mischief Makers: Mischief Theatre, the irrepressible young troupe behind both Peter Pan Goes Wrong (due for a West End return toward the end of the year) and the still-running The Play That Goes Wrong, will attempt to make it three hits for three with the premiere at the Criterion Theatre of The Comedy About a Bank Robbery—the company’s first show set in the U.S. The authors, as before, are Henry Lewis, Henry Shields, and Jonathan Sayer. Previews continue prior to an April 21 opening.ALSO: Linda Marlowe heads the cast of In the Bar of a Tokyo Hotel, a little-known Tennessee Williams play that opens April 11 at the Charing Cross Theatre, with Robert Chevara directing. The Almeida Theatre—twice-represented on Broadway this season with King Charles III and American Psycho—opens the new Leo Butler play Boy the following night; Sacha Wares is at the helm.APRIL 18-24Faustian Pact: Final full week of previews at the Duke of York’s Theatre of the ever-busy director Jamie Lloyd’s production of the Christopher Marlowe repertory mainstay Doctor Faustus, starring Game of Thrones heartthrob Kit Harington in the title role and Olivier Award winner and Tony nominee Jenna Russell as the unexpected choice to play Mephistopheles.ALSO: Previews begin April 22 at Southwark Playhouse of the European premiere of the off-Broadway musical, The Toxic Avenger, directed by Benji Sperring and starring Mark Anderson and Hannah Grover. Musical theater buffs will be heading to the Chichester Festival Theatre south of London for previews of Travels With My Aunt, the new musical from the Betty Blue Eyes team of George Stiles and Anthony Drewe with a book by the Emmy-winning Americans Ron Cowen and Daniel Lipman (Queer as Folk). Patricia Hodge plays the role of Aunt Augusta for which Maggie Smith was nominated for a 1972 Oscar.APRIL 25-MAY 1Rolling Along: The granddaddy of Broadway musicals, Show Boat, gets a major London airing when actor-turned-director Daniel Evans transfers his Sheffield Theatre production of the 1927 Jerome Kern-Oscar Hammerstein II classic to the New London Theatre. Gina Beck and American performer Chris Peluso play the romantic leads Magnolia and Gaylord with Rebecca Trehearn as Julie and Emmanuel Kojo as Joe. Opening night is April 25.ALSO: Elegy, the new play from Constellations scribe Nick Payne, opens on April 27 at the Donmar Warehouse. It stars Zoe Wanamaker, Nina Sosanya, and Barbara Flynn; Donmar artistic director Josie Rourke directs. Previews start April 28 at the Hampstead Theatre for the premiere of Lawrence After Arabia, Howard Brenton’s play about T.E. Lawrence, the British adventurer and diplomat who was immortalized onscreen by the legendary Peter O’Toole. John Dove, whose London production of Farinelli and the King has been mooted for a Broadway run next season, directs. View Comments Glenn Closelast_img read more

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GE Aviation Rutland gets $1.4 million contract for Navy fighter engines

first_imgSenator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) Friday announced a new $1.4 million US Navy contract with General Electric Aviation for work in Rutland on additional components of the company’s F414-GE-400 engine used in the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet aircraft and the E/A-18G Growler aircraft.  The full contract, for work performed in Rutland and at several other GE plants, amounts to $28,202,039 for purchase of six full engines, four engine fan modules, 14 engine high pressure combustion modules, and five combuster modules. Leahy, a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee and of its Defense Subcommittee, which handles the Senate’s work in writing the annual Defense budget bill, last week joined GE Aviation employees here to tour major enhancements of the GE Aviation Rutland facility.  The F414-GE-400 is one of many military and commercial engines produced by GE Aviation.  The Rutland facility primarily produces jet engine blades and vanes.“This contract underscores the vital role that GE Aviation Rutland’s workers are to our fleet of military aircraft,” said Leahy. Source: Leahy. RUTLAND, Vt. (FRIDAY, July 30, 2010) – # # # # #last_img read more

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Fridays on the Fly: Standing In A River Thinking

first_imgYou turn a corner and you see it: the perfect 100-yard rippling trout run. It flows from a barrel-rolling ripple into a maze of boulders misted with the bouncing current that drops into a swift plunge pool framed with eddies, slowing to a flat tail-out. Not a soul has been here in years, or so you like to think. This is why we have a fishing license, favorite fly, or volunteer to face the contempt of the spouse when you return four hours late due to “car trouble,” which they know is just a huge fishing story.For over a decade, I traveled the country, singing songs from dirty bars to country clubs to hip hidden brewpubs, but it wasn’t until a few years ago that I became a two-tool troubadour: folk songs and angling. Recently I have written too many mediocre fishing songs that no one will ever get to hear. Come to think on it, I only can name a couple fishing songs that are worth even talking about.Scott LowNow I am getting older, and have had my first beautiful daughter. I knew I should be fishing and singing closer to my home in Rabun County, Georgia. We have gorgeous lakes and blue lines running down every mountainside with wild- and hatchery-supported fish. Television shows have covered our fishing. Books have been written. Now I love to hook a big largemouth or chase crappie on topwater as much as the next, but once I was given a Sage Discovery Fly Rod and hooked a 16” holdover Rainbow trout on the Upper Tallulah, my target was obvious.Now I have gathered too many rods and leaky waders. Thread, feathers, fur, and hooks are also entirely too plentiful. As I started fishing on the Tallulah and began noticing few fly fishermen, I began to seek out where they fished. I learned that the good fishing for the wading feather slinger seems to be a well-kept secret or you must leave Rabun to White county or cross into North Carolina. North Carolina has some great water protected as delayed harvest/catch and release streams or tucked away high above the corn slingers. Oh yes, Rabun has a delayed harvest on the mighty Chattooga, but it is serviced by South Carolina. And we do have a small but satisfying fly shop at Reeves. For a tourist town, it seems we are missing a usually well-to-do clientele of fly anglers.Rainbow TroutMy time touring this great country as a musician is less with two kids, a gorgeous wife, and a broken music industry. So, before the daughter came, we began looking for a house that we could pay off in 30 years. Twenty properties later we found a spot listed as “A Trout Fisherman’s Dream.” The previous owner had built the spot in 1978 and lived here until his passing a few years ago. In those few years, all his gardens and bird sanctuaries had become jungles of briars and poisonous things. But that water looked very “trout-y.” I had to find out.So one morning I ventured out and waded thru the weeds and overgrown trails down under the bridge. Within a minute, a large streak under the water came hurtling toward me and bumped my leg. It was too large for a fish in this creek, though my mind did immediately think catfish. After some days of pondering, I decided it was a muskrat who hadn’t seen a human in this water in a while. Although I did see evidence of some “fishing,” i.e. cans of corn and Busch Light, I started connecting with trout and horny heads immediately.As I reached the top of the property, I had held 13 trout and lost a few more. There is a small section I later learned from DNR, right above the property, that is grandfathered in as public access right on the road. While casting from the sliver of land between the road and creek, a huge splash hits upstream from me. I turn upstream and a huge deer is swimming down the creek towards this hole. She doesn’t care I am already fishing there and comes right through. No less than 20 seconds later, I hook the biggest fish of the day from under the deer’s path: a 15” brown trout on a cream mopfly.Big Ol’ BrownI rush home to the wife and tell her this is our future. My life of dim light bars and rickety stages may have to take a hiatus. I can see a future for the family. We can build a utopia. I mean, isn’t that what we all yearn for? Happiness, sustainability, community? I had found  a private trout stream with a campground, set on the creek with a stage for songs and a field for permaculture. I had chased my dream of singing songs to change your day for a long time—not knowing if these shows were for me or them. But now I see a place for all of us and for the art of fly fishing and conservation of our beautiful region and culture: Hatch Camp and Art Farm. Search for happiness. Fish for peace. Live for art and culture. We can try.Scott Low is a songwriter, fly fishing guide, and owner of Hatch Camp and Art Farm, a private Fly Fishing camp and guide service in Clayton, Georgia.last_img read more

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August 1, 2003 On the Move

first_img Henry Kaplan has joined Feldman Gale & Weber, P.A., with offices at the Miami Center, 19th Fl., 201 S. Biscayne Blvd., Miami 33131, telephone (305) 358-5001. He practices in intellectual property matters. M. Keith Lipscomb and Mirit D. Steiger have joined Kluger, Peretz, Kaplan & Berlin P.L., with offices at the Miami Center, 17th Fl., 201 S. Biscayne Blvd., Miami 33131, telephone (305) 379-9000. They both join the firm’s intellectual property protection & commercialization group. Jeffrey M. Schumm, former assistant attorney general and judicial law clerk for the Honorable Justice Major B. Harding, has joined Holland & Knight LLP, with offices located at 315 S. Calhoun Street, Ste. 600, Tallahassee, 32301, telephone (850) 224-7000. He practices in the area of commercial litigation with concentration on consumer fraud, deceptive and unfair trade practices, antitrust, trade regulation and competition, technology, and intellectual property. Stella Suarez-Rita has become an associate with Gunster Yoakley, with offices at Phillips Point, 777 S. Flagler Dr., Ste. 500 E., West Palm Beach 33401, telephone (561) 655-1980. She concentrates in the area of general real estate transactions. Glenn A. Harris, former assistant chief litigation counsel for the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, has joined Greenberg Traurig, LLP, with offices at 1221 Brickell Ave., Miami 33131, telephone (305) 579-0500. He joins the firm’s litigation practice. Erik P. Kimball, former shareholder with Nabors, Giblin & Nickerson, P. A, has joined Akerman Senterfitt, with offices at the Citrus Center, 17th Fl., 255 S. Orange Ave., Orlando 32801, telephone (407) 843-7860. He practices in bankruptcy and creditors’ rights. Leslie José Zigel has joined Greenberg Traurig, LLP, with offices at 1221 Brickell Ave., Miami 33131, telephone (305) 579-0500. He concentrates in entertainment law. Frank P. Mayernick, Jr., has joined the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, with offices at 2737 Centerview Dr., Tallahassee 32399, telephone (850) 413-7313. He will serve as its director of legislative affairs. Amir A. Ladan and Keith A. Carsten of Carsten & Ladan, P.A. announce their relocation to new offices at 101 S. Wymore Road, Suite 440, Altamonte Springs 32714, telephone (407) 657-1555. The firm concentrates in the areas of criminal defense, civil litigation, contracts, and entertainment law. M. Mark Heekin, former general counsel with Sleiman Enterprises, Inc., and David J. Heekin, announce the formation of their practice, Heekin & Heekin, P.A., with offices at 4540 Southside Blvd., Ste. 801, Jacksonville 32216, telephone (904) 998-4200. The firm concentrates in the areas of commercial and residential real estate. Todd Falzone, Robert Ground, Peggy Fisher and Jeffrey Respler have joined Ferraro & Associates, P.A., with offices at 4000 Ponce De Leon Blvd., Ste. 700, Coral Gables, FL 33146, telephone (305) 375-0111. Falzone and Ground practice in asbestos matters; Fisher practices in appellate matters; and Respler drafts briefs and appeals. David S. Hendrix, formerly with Cohn, Cohn & Hendrix, P.A., has joined GrayHarris, with offices at 201 N. Franklin St., Ste. 2200, P.O. Box 3324, Tampa 33602, telephone (813) 273-5000. He practices in the areas of banking and commercial litigation, international, lender law, and software licensing. Michaelle Paulson has become an associate with Markowitz, Davis, Ringel & Trusty, P.A., Two Datran Center, Suite 1225, 9130 S. Dadeland Blvd., Miami, 33156, telephone (305) 670-5000. Kevin R. Lottes, formerly with Porter Wright Morris & Arthur, LLP, has become a partner with Quarles & Brady, LLP, with offices at Tamiami Trail N., Ste. 300, Naples 34103, telephone (239) 262-5959. He concentrates in the areas of commercial real estate law, residential real estate law, contracts, and commercial transactions. Roger Cabrera, formerly an assistant state attorney, has joined De la Pena & Associates, P.A. He joins the firm’s litigation department. Scott M. Teich has joined Schell, Quillin, Mitchel & Cooley, L.L.P, with offices at 17130 Arvida Pkwy., Ste. 1, Weston, telephone (954) 659-8383. He practices in the areas of medical malpractice defense, dental malpractice defense, nursing home negligence defense, and insurance defense. Alyssa R. Feder has joined David Pratt and Associates, P.A., with offices in Boca Raton, Boynton Beach and West Palm Beach. She practices in the areas of estate planning, estate and gift taxation, and probate and trust administration. Brian A. Hart and Brian S. Tenenholtz have become members of the newly named Rafferty, Hart, Stolzenberg, Gelles & Tenenholtz, P.A., with new offices located at 1401 Brickell Ave. Ste. 825, Miami, telephone (305) 373-0330. Hart concentrates in corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, real estate law and health care law; Tenenholtz practices in the areas of domestic and international tax and estate planning and corporate law. August 1, 2003 On the Move August 1, 2003 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Finding new ways to serve the nation’s underbanked

first_imgAccording to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, approximately 27 percent of all American households are unbanked or underbanked – that’s 50 million individuals.For purposes of this article, unbanked refers to individuals who don’t have a bank account and underbanked refers to those who supplement their bank account with alternative financial services like check cashers. Both underbanked and unbanked households are typically forced to rely on nonbank financial or high-rate lending solutions such as payday lending, tax refund, and settlement loans.How did we get here? Why are so many people in the United States outside of traditional banking security in 2016? There are several reasons why, with many people falling into more than one category. This article addresses these issues and provides solutions your credit union can offer to serve the underbanked and help them become members of your credit union. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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My Wife Sarah Jessica Parker Is My ‘Best Friend’

first_imgMatthew Broderick My Wife Sarah Jessica Parker Is My Best FriendSarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick at the Broadway opening of ‘The Inheritance’ at Barrymore Theater on November 17, 2019 in New York City. MJ Photos/ShutterstockA strong foundation. Matthew Broderick is still head over heels for his wife, Sarah Jessica Parker, after 23 years of marriage.The Ferris Bueller’s Day Off star, 58, opened up about his successful relationship on the Friday, November 6, episode of SiriusXM’s “Quarantined with Bruce.” Broderick said that he considers the Sex and the City alum, 55, his “best friend.”- Advertisement – “I don’t know the secret [to marriage] at all,  but I’m very grateful and I love her and, it’s amazing,” he said, noting that he “can’t believe” they’ve been married for 23 years.Broderick also praised his “talented” wife’s acting abilities in their Broadway play Plaza Suite. The couple costarred in the production which was pushed back to 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic.“I should also say that getting to do this play, even though we only just did it in Boston for a little while, Plaza Suite, you know, she was so, so good in it,” he said.  “And I had never acted with her onstage and had never really acted with her at all. And I was just reminded of how funny and smart and what a great actor she is. But, she just, she’s very good at it. So, I hope everybody gets to see her do it.”- Advertisement – “We’ve grown,” the Hocus Pocus star said at the time. “We have a family, we have children, we have friends that have passed away, we have relationships … We don’t talk about it — that’s how it stays strong!”The Failure to Launch actress told Harper’s Bazaar in 2013 that the couple have never been interested in fame.“Matthew and I come from a different time and place. When we were young people, all we ever wanted was to be good working actors,” Parker said at the time. “We didn’t think of fame or money because, honestly, money was never part of the dream. It was to work in theater, to be around those people whose work I was in total awe of. I never saw the trappings; nobody talked about being a celebrity.”Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories! – Advertisement – The Producers star and Parker met in 1991 and tied the knot six years later at a Lower East Side synagogue in May 1997. The duo are the parents of son James, 18, and 11-year-old twins, Marion and Tabitha.Parker told in September 2019 the key to keeping their marriage strong after all these years.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Today, the presentation of the views of the owners of the hotel complex and the renovation project Haludovo

first_imgA presentation of the renovation project will be held in Crikvenica today, as well as the views of the owners of the Haludovo hotel complex on the potential investment of 250 to 300 million euros.The presentation will take place Nov. 07 at 17 p.m. u school sports hall in Bogovići. On the same day, a meeting will be held at the Ministry of Tourism in Zagreb, on the topic “Tourist project Hotels Haludovo, Malinska”, to which representatives of individual ministries, state agencies, Primorje-Gorski Kotar County and the Municipality have been invited.The whole story about the renovation of the famous hotel complex Haludovo in Malinska, once one of the best symbols of our tourism, raised a lot of dust because the owner is looking for a closed concession as a precondition for the renovation.As pointed out earlier, the intention of the owners of Haludov is to obtain a closed concession as a condition for starting the project, with the explanation that this provides a high level of security and top quality offer for hotel guests. The position of the Municipality of Malinska-Dubašnica is that they are not for a completely closed type concession, while the subject of discussion can only be a partially closed concession, depending on which area, which it covers and in what way.Related news: THE INVESTOR IS LOOKING FOR A CLOSED CONCESSION ON THE MARITIME PROPERTY AS A PREREQUISITE FOR THE RENOVATION OF THE HALUDOVO HOTEL COMPLEXlast_img read more

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Virus fears force animal sellers online for Muslim festival

first_imgPrancing in front of a camera with its blond mane blowing in the wind, “007” is one of thousands of goats being sold online as Muslims prepare for a key religious festival shaken this year by the coronavirus pandemic.Millions of goats, sheep and cattle are slaughtered annually at Eid al-Adha — the festival of sacrifice — one of two major holy days observed by Muslims across the world, including some 600 million in South Asia.The pandemic has, however, badly hit India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, which have shut or heavily restricted major markets, while fears about catching the virus are keeping customers away ahead of the main festival on Saturday. “We were traumatized by the loss of two of my uncles to COVID-19 and didn’t want to sacrifice an animal,” Saddid Hossain told AFP in Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka.”But we have to stay within our religious tradition, so we’d rather buy from an online cow seller.”Faced with deserted markets, livestock breeders and traders have turned to websites, apps and social media to showcase their animals.Fahad Zariwala promotes goats such as “007” from farms across India on his YouTube channel, which has more than 800,000 followers. Video beauty contest “They have a personality and are… mostly named after Bollywood movies and trending characters in Bollywood,” he told AFP.Zariwala has seen a huge increase in viewers from Australia, Britain, the United States and the Middle East, which all have large South Asian diasporas.One farm he promotes runs video beauty contests to tempt potential customers, who might buy the goats for their families in India, where there are 200 million Muslims.PashuBajaar, which sells thousands of goats for Indian farmers, said online sales had jumped from a few dozen last year to more than 2,500 in the past three months.”We’ve even received online orders for thousands for next year,” chief executive Sanjeev Kumar told AFP.The animals are delivered to buyers in open-air vehicles, which can carry 10 to 15 of them.In Muslim-majority Pakistan, home to 215 million people, dozens of apps and websites have sprung up.Buyers can select an animal and have it delivered to their doorstep, slaughtered or donated to a charity.Qurbani App chief executive Muhammad Ali Chaudhry said “orders have gone through the roof”.Islamabad goat farmer Muhammad Naeem, meanwhile, said his digital transactions had jumped from 20 percent of sales to almost half.But the rise in online sales has been accompanied by plunging prices.Mumbai seller Walid Dawood Jat, who sold six goats online during India’s lockdown, said they fetched just half their usual prices.”We used to sell goats at 500-600 rupees ($6.70-$8.00) per kilo,” he said, adding the price had fallen by half.”Buyers haggle with us. They say they don’t have money, their income is down.”In Dhaka’s biggest cattle market, livestock sales are down from 400,000 a week in previous years to 30,000.”Last year many people came. We were very busy,” said trader Kalu Bepari — who travelled 245 kilometers to the bazaar with 13 bulls, but has only sold two “for a very cheap price”.”This year there is barely anyone due to coronavirus fears. Nobody even asks the price.” “I shoot a slow-motion video with beautiful music, and I make them [goats] popular,” said Zariwala, who is based in Mumbai. Topics :last_img read more

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