New Jersey man wins $315.3 million Powerball jackpot during trip to return orange juice that wasn’t on sale

first_imgABC News(HACKENSACK, N.J.) — A New Jersey man who heeded his wife’s instructions to return a bottle of orange juice is now a multi-millionaire after he bought the winning ticket for the $315.3 million Powerball jackpot during the transaction.On May 1, the day of the drawing, 56-year-old Little Ferry resident Tayeb Souami had purchased orange juice for $5 at a ShopRite in Hackensack, but his wife told him to return it because it was on sale for $2.50 elsewhere, he said at a press conference Friday.Souami then went to the customer service counter, and the Powerball sign that read $306 million caught his eye, he said.“I like the number,” he said he thought to himself before buying two tickets with the cash he was refunded from the orange juice.The next day, Souami found out he’d won in a dramatic fashion.He had planned to do some work in his backyard, but realizing his car was dirty, he decided to get it washed first, he said.While Souami was stopped at a red light, he noticed a 7-Eleven store to his right and went inside to check his lottery tickets.The first ticket scanned wasn’t a winner, he said. The second ticket was “good,” but on the scanner read instructions to see the cashier.“Can you check?” Souami said he asked the cashier. “I think your machine isn’t working.”The cashier immediately said “Oh my God,” after scanning the ticket, Souami said.“What do you mean by, ‘Oh my God?’” he asked her. But she kept repeating, causing Souami’s heart rate to soar.When the cashier finally responded, she said simply said “big,” Souami said.Although Souami is an accountant, he didn’t want to see the number just yet, he said.It took him two hours to get home because his hands were shaking. When he walked in the door, his wife asked him what took him so long and then started crying when he showed her the lottery form.Souami told reporters that he was “very emotional” after walking into the press conference with a wide smile on his face.When asked why it took him so long to come forward, he replied, “Actually, my work.” Souami, who is originally from Africa, is an accountant for a food importing company and wanted to make sure the more than 200 people he works with would be OK, he said.“I have to take care of them,” he said. “It’s not so easy to quit just like that.”Souami has since quit his job and plans to stay in his New Jersey hometown, for now, he said.The first things he plans to do with winnings are pay to pay off his college loans, pay for his daughter to go to college next year and pay off his home, which he had just refinanced and received the check for last week.He is the second New Jersey resident to win a major jackpot this year. In March, a Vernon resident won the $533 million Mega Millions prize.Souami, a father of two, said he decided to take the more than $183 million cash payout.“I love orange juice now,” he said, laughing.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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The absence of sharks from abyssal regions of the world’s oceans

first_imgThe oceanic abyss (depths greater than 3000 m), one of the largest environments on the planet, ischaracterized by absence of solar light, high pressures and remoteness from surface food supplynecessitating special molecular, physiological, behavioural and ecological adaptations of organisms thatlive there. Sampling by trawl, baited hooks and cameras we show that the Chondrichthyes (sharks, rays andchimaeras) are absent from, or very rare in this region. Analysis of a global data set shows a trend of rapiddisappearance of chondrichthyan species with depth when compared with bony fishes. Sharks, apparentlywell adapted to life at high pressures are conspicuous on slopes down to 2000 m including scavenging atfood falls such as dead whales. We propose that they are excluded from the abyss by high-energy demand,including an oil-rich liver for buoyancy, which cannot be sustained in extreme oligotrophic conditions.Sharks are apparently confined to ca 30% of the total ocean and distribution of many species is fragmentedaround sea mounts, ocean ridges and ocean margins. All populations are therefore within reach of humanfisheries, and there is no hidden reserve of chondrichthyan biomass or biodiversity in the deep sea. Sharksmay be more vulnerable to over-exploitation than previously thought.last_img read more

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Multi-branch conveyancing firm closed down amid dramatic scenes

first_imgHome » News » Multi-branch conveyancing firm closed down amid dramatic scenes previous nextRegulation & LawMulti-branch conveyancing firm closed down amid dramatic scenesThe Foster Partnership ceases trading after Council for Licenced Conveyancers runs out of patience following accounting irregularities at the conveyancing firm.Nigel Lewis21st October 201904,988 Views A leading conveyancing legal firm has ceased trading after being shut down by the industry regulator.The Foster Partnership has had its licence revoked by the Council for Licenced Conveyancers (CLC) which has told staff to return home and shut down its website.The three-year-old conveyancing firm, which has branches in Ramsgate, Rainham, Margate, Herne Bay and Broadstairs in Kent, employs thirty people and has commercial links to many estate agents and developers in the county.Its demise in such a public manner is highly unusual; at several of the branches dramatic scenes unravelled on Friday during which CLC officials arrived at the firm’s premises and told staff to go home, local media report.Problems were identified at the conveyancing company when, during a 2018 annual regulatory audit, breaches of the company’s professional rules were uncovered including serious accounting errors. These were reported to the CLC.Rectify issues“Since that time, we have worked tirelessly with the CLC, our auditors and indemnity insurers to identify and rectify the issues, including implementing more stringent management and accounting policies,” a spokesperson told a local news website.“In spite of this, the CLC have obviously run out of patience and have taken the drastic step of intervening in the practice.”In an official statement published online, the regulator said: “In light of breaches of the Code of Conduct and to protect the interests of the firm’s clients, [we  have] intervened.”All files and client monies have now been transferred to another Kent-based conveyancing firm, Stephensons Solicitors.Read more about the conveyancing industry.Foster Partnership CLC Council for Licensed Conveyancers October 21, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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It’s Good to Talk

first_imgThe proposals to dramatically reduce the number of tutorials history undergraduates receive as part of their degree course is part of a worrying trend, and one that shows no signs of stopping until students wise up to the fact that cuts in tutorials will compromise the worth of their Oxford degree. Sixth Formers now see a degree as a commodity to be bought, not as the right it once was. Oxford’s unique selling point is the tutorial system, and before the University goes ahead with tutorial cuts in other subjects, as it already has with philosophy and other humanities, it should consult those who the cuts will affect them most. The focus should be on students, particularly as with dramatically increasing fees over the next few years, we will have more spending power. However over the last week the focus has shifted unnecessarily towards a discussion of the rights of consultation enjoyed by students when changes are proposed. The History Faculty must bear the bulk of the responsibility for this. A situation in which the relevant student representatives (the history UJCC) are only made aware of major changes being made to the teaching of their degrees via a third party and only after changes are all but finalised is clearly unacceptable. There is no suggestion that Oxford is making the slow move from tutorials to classes to improve the quality of undergraduate teaching. If this was the case, it would have been nice of the faculty to explain this to students in recent weeks. The suggestion, by some in the Faculty, that students were suitably consulted because similar proposals were put several years ago to (and rejected by) a previous UJCC is laughable. It would allow any changes to be made without reference to students as long as sufficient time had elapsed since the matter was discussed with them. It should be noted that neither OUSU or the UJCC has ruled out the possibility of supporting changes to teaching methods. The real issue then is why are these changes being suggested? If they follow from a need to save money on undergraduate teaching then the motive is weak in comparison to the future of student’s degrees. The argument that tutorials should be cut to reduce stress on tutors and encourage research does not avoid the label of being resource based and as such should be taken with caution. However, if these changes stem from a genuine wish to improve the educational experience of students at Oxford then they should be welcomed. Conservative attitudes to teaching methods can be just as damaging to standards as finance driven cuts. The onus then is on the Faculty to prove that the changes they propose will improve teaching and that they are committed to a genuine partnership with students to implement reform.ARCHIVE: 4th week TT 2003last_img read more

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Freeholder Censured by Board Members

first_imgCape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders. (Courtesy capemaycountynj.gov) The following is a statement from Cape May County Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton on Resolution 497-19 and 498-19 related to two censures of Freeholder E. Marie Hayes: We are disappointed by the behavior that was described in the investigation that was conducted by an independent law firm regarding Freeholder Hayes’ actions. The decision that was made was the result of a six-month workplace investigation that interviewed 17 people and culminated with a 114-page investigation report. As a result, the decision was made by the Freeholder Board to put forward by Resolution two censures to Freeholder Hayes. No one employee or Freeholder in the County should be put above anyone else. We don’t make this decision lightly but felt we had to do what is in the best interest of the County government. The investigation led the Freeholder Board to vote in a closed session for two censures, one based on an allegation of retaliatory conduct and a second based on a violation of the County’s Conflict of Interest Policy. I will add that this is a particularly tough decision for myself as I have been a friend of Freeholder Hayes for 30 years. However, we are confident in the integrity of the investigation and welcome any further investigation by the State into the matter. We thoroughly believe further investigation into the matter will only strengthen the decision made by the Freeholder Board.last_img read more

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Starbucks responds to recycling jibes

first_imgStarbucks, the coffee shop chain, has announced that it will offer a 50p discount to customers who bring in their own coffee cup.This comes a week after a campaign was launched to reduce the 2.5 billion disposable cups dumped in landfill or incinerated each year in Britain.High street coffee chains were accused of making false claims about how many paper cups they recycle, with less than one in 400 paper coffee cups being recycled, despite many carrying the recycling logo. – see more at: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, the television chef and anti-waste campaigner, said Starbucks’ decision to give a 50p discount to those who don’t require a paper cup as a “seismic leap”.The scheme will be trialled for two months, starting in April.Those who bring their own cup will see the price of medium-sized lattes and cappuccinos, both of which normally cost £2.70, reduced to £2.20.last_img read more

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Start Making Sense Offer Fans “Once In A Lifetime” Trip To Cuba

first_imgStart Making Sense: A Tribute to Talking Heads is offering fans a “Once in a Lifetime” chance to join the band for an educational/cultural/performance/people-to-people exchange trip to Cuba! In association with Porterra Travel, Rocks Off, Molimar Export Consultants Inc., with travel arrangements by Interplanner, the event is slated for April 25-29, 2018. The trip will feature two live performances by Start Making Sense in Havana, as well as a tour of the historic city and local museums. This is a chance for fans to fully immerse themselves in the Afro-Cuban music and culture that influenced a large portion of Talking Heads’ eclectic sound.“The full history of Cuban music is filled with some of the most beautiful compositions and rhythms, which, due to its strength, has influenced music around the globe. Getting closer to that place may give us all a better understanding of Talking Heads’ music, the music that inspired it, and music in general,” says Start Making Sense front-man Jonathan Braun.More than just a trip abroad, Braun says it is a cultural journey–a journey that took eight months of work to arrange and one in which the band hopes to connect with fans and the Cuban people on a deeper level. “We all know that music is a universal language; let’s be part of a larger conversation,” he said.In addition to their performances in Havana, Start Making Sense will be adding philanthropic elements to the trip. The band will be donating drum sticks, guitar strings, colored pencils, pens and other items and encourages fans who travel with them to do the same. “We have seen the happiness and joy that Start Making Sense shows have brought to people across the United States,” Braun says. “We plan on bringing that contagious joy with us and sharing it with the Cuban people.”Start Making Sense Travel Package includes:• Roundtrip airfare from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Havana, Cuba (via American Airlines)• Four-night stay at the Hotel Four Points by Sheraton• Admission to Start Making Sense concerts at Casa De La Musica EGREM and Palacio de la Rumba in Havana, Cuba• Daily breakfast• Three lunches and two dinners (including welcome and farewell dinners with members of Start Making Sense)• Roundtrip airport transfers in Havana• English-speaking guide for full program• Air-conditioned motor coach and driver• Visa fees• City tour of Havana, Cuba• City tour of Old Havana• Tour of Hemingway Museum• Tour of Regla Church and Museum• Afro-Cuban ritual dancing• Cooking class• Farewell reception at Santa Isabel Hotel• Evening entertainment and show at Havana Jazz Cafe• Amistur/ICAP Cuba travel orientation meeting• United States and Cuban departure taxes• Two bottles of water per person, per day• Full escort by tour director• Local English-speaking representative servicesCost:• Double Occupancy: $2575 (airfare included on American Airlines)• Single Occupancy upgrade: $364• Deposit due upon registration: $500 (non-refundable)• Travel Arrangements by InterplannerFor more information, tickets, sign up, head here.last_img read more

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Harvard helping the helpers

first_imgThis fall, Harvard University’s Teaching and Learning Partnerships (TLP) team will begin a new collaboration with the Boston Public Library (BPL).The TLP team will train more than 50 Boston high school students to become effective mentors for the BPL’s Homework Help program. The team will use an approach developed by Harvard University’s SmartTALK program. SmartTALK offers a structured way to support children’s learning, focusing on methods for effective use of homework time and on proven ways to transition children to game-related learning following the completion of their homework.Since 2000, the BPL has offered free, drop-in homework help to Boston youth, providing a much-needed academic service to students in kindergarten through eighth grade, as well as employment opportunities for Boston teens.This school year, 62 high-achieving teens from diverse backgrounds and neighborhoods are serving as Homework Help mentors in the 24 library branches. Among them will be the 50 teens who are also part of the TLP training.For some, working as a mentor is the result of their own positive experience as a child — when they received homework assistance in the BPL.“I grew up going to the Honan-Allston Library and would often get homework help there,” said 16-year-old mentor José Mendoza, who attends Mary Lyon Pilot High School in Brighton. “I have two younger sisters, in the first and third grade, and I help them from time to time with their work. One of my friends worked at BPL in the summer, and when she told me about it [Homework Help], I figured it could be fun. I also was a mentee myself at the Harvard-Allston Education Portal in the first year of its mentoring program.”Since its launch in 2008, Harvard’s SmartTALK has worked to address a key concern of many after-school programs: having staff/volunteers who are adequately prepared and trained to help children of all ages develop strong academic skills outside of school hours. The combination of homework assistance and mentorship in the BPL’s Homework Help program aligns with the goals of SmartTALK, making it a natural collaboration.“Besides the critical homework help, SmartTALK also realizes that success in school is about so much more than just finishing homework,” said Joan Matsalia, associate director of Teaching and Learning Partnerships at Harvard University. “It also works to strengthen a student’s relationship with the teachers and mentors. It helps them become more organized, develop better and stronger study skills, become more effective problem-solvers, and [it] teaches them how to work more effectively in groups.”“We couldn’t be happier with the progress of this program and are incredibly excited about this exciting new venture with the Boston Public Library,” Matsalia added.“The Boston Public Library is proud to have Harvard onboard as a partner in our Homework Help program,” said Amanda Bressler, youth outreach librarian for the BPL and manager of the Homework Help program. “SmartTALK training will give our mentors the skills and added confidence to do their job well, and, in turn, it will benefit those children who rely on Homework Help as a source of academic support. I look forward to seeing where this collaborative effort takes us.”During the current academic school year, the TLP team will offer three separate training sessions to more than 60 Boston high school students. The first session, offered in late October, focused on teaching students how to ask good questions and on the most effective ways to problem solve. The winter session will focus on behavior management, and on understanding and maximizing group culture. Finally, the spring session will focus on the importance of — and how to — keep learning fun as the homework mentors engage students and optimize learning through games.For more information about the Boston Public Library’s Homework Help program, including a complete schedule, please visit its website.last_img read more

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Elementary Students Become Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade Balloon Makers

first_imgSubmitted image.JAMESTOWN – Jamestown Public Schools officials say Bush Elementary School fourth graders became Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade balloon makers through an ELA persuasive writing assignment in Cristin Hockenberry’s class. The students wrote a persuasive essay for the Macy’s parade committee explaining why their balloon should be included in the annual parade.Submitted image.Mrs. Hockenberry collaborated with JPS Technology Integration Specialist, Jason Kathman, to have the kids create a photograph of their balloons, complete with a new background, using their iPads.“The idea of writing a persuasive essay to convince the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade committee to choose a new balloon comes from a former teaching teammate, Scott Chelli, who I still collaborate with to create lessons that engage students in learning,” said Hockenberry. “Writing is one of those topics that can be challenging to get students excited about. By adding this technology component to the lesson, students were actively taking part in learning over multiple standards in one lesson over multiple days.” “On day two when a student asked, ‘Are we going to get to work on our writing today?’ I knew they were really excited about what we were doing. They never ask to write! The students liked this writing assignment and the technology piece because it pulled everything together and made the topic seem real.”Hockenberry’s class has been doing a lot of writing this year. They have been writing to entertain with creative writing, writing to inform with explanatory pieces, writing to respond to text they have read, and even writing poetry to connect to the main character in Love That Dog.Submitted image.Having students switch to a persuasive writing piece allowed them the opportunity to work on the voice of their writing while continuing to build on their basic knowledge of language skills. Students were engaged in the project because they had a connection to the balloon they wanted to see in the parade.This connection made it much easier for them to find reasons to be able to persuade the “committee.” Having the opportunity to actually create the balloon using technology allowed students the chance to see their balloon to connect it to their writing.Students really loved this project.“I chose a unicorn for my balloon,” said Bush Elementary School fourth grader, Maddie Wilkins, who brought in a stuffed unicorn to photograph. “The reason I gave why I chose the unicorn is because kids like unicorns because they have magical powers, including the ability to fly. So that makes sense for them to be in the Macy’s parade as a balloon. I think it’s fun because we aren’t just writing, we are learning things about technology and I think that is kind of cool.”Kathman helped the kids take the photos, download them into Keynote and take out the “green screen” to replace with a fun, new background photograph such as an old Macy’s Day Parade or sky.“Jason had a significant role in making this project happen,” said Hockenberry. “He has been a blessing with all areas of technology every single time I email or call about a lesson. I told him what I wanted to do and that I wanted to move beyond having students draw a picture of their balloon or print something from the Internet. He threw this idea out, created videos to teach the students how to use the different technology pieces needed so students could work at their own pace, and even took the time to help in the classroom. It was a great collaboration between ELA and technology.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Ag over breakfast

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaThe political and economic changes that have swept over the U.S. this year directly affect Georgia agriculture. The 2009 Ag Forecast will give Georgians involved in agriculture and agribusiness a chance to talk about the past and future over breakfast at five different locations across the state in January.The forecast breakfasts will be held from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Jan. 26 in Dalton, Jan. 27 in Gainesville, Jan. 28 in Statesboro, Jan. 29 in Tifton and Jan. 30 in Macon. The Gainesville breakfast location has changed this year and will be at the Gainesville Civic Center.Economic experts from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will discuss politics and international programs specific to agriculture and give a crop forecast for ’09.Participants will receive a copy of the 2009 Agricultural Price and Profit Planning Book. It provides a detailed analysis of each major Georgia agricultural product.Registration costs $40 per person or $300 for a table of eight. For more information, call (706) 542-2434 or visit www.GeorgiaAgForecast.com. To register, visit the Web site or call Carla Wood at (706) 583-0347.last_img read more

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