Near-surface climate and surface energy budget of Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

first_imgData collected by two automatic weather stations(AWS) on the Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctica, between 22 January 2009 and 1 February 2011 are analyzed and used asinput for a model that computes the surface energy budget(SEB), which includes melt energy. The two AWSs are separated by about 70 km in the north–south direction, and both the near-surface meteorology and the SEB show similarities, although small differences in all components (most notably the melt flux) can be seen. The impact of subsurface absorption of shortwave radiation on melt and snow temperature is significant, and discussed. In winter, longwave cooling of the surface is entirely compensated by a downward turbulent transport of sensible heat. In summer, the positive net radiative flux is compensated by melt, and quite frequently by upward turbulent diffusion of heat and moisture, leading to sublimation and weak convection over the ice shelf. The month of November 2010 is highlighted, when strong westerly flow over the Antarctic Peninsula led to a dry and warm f¨ohn wind over the ice shelf, resulting in warm and sunny conditions. Under these conditions the increase in shortwave and sensible heat fluxes is larger than the decrease of net longwave and latent heat fluxes, providing energy for significant melt.last_img read more

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USS Gary Participates in Community Engagement Project

first_img View post tag: USS Training & Education Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Gary Participates in Community Engagement Project October 31, 2012 USS Gary Participates in Community Engagement Project View post tag: Participates View post tag: community View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval View post tag: Engagement Navy frigate USS Gary (FFG 51) participated in a community engagement project playing soccer with local children and painting two classrooms for a local school during a port visit Oct. 28 while supporting Operation Martillo.“It was a great opportunity to work with the Costa Rican students and teachers at the Urenas school,” said Cmdr. James Pickens, USS Gary executive officer. “Our Sailors enjoyed playing soccer with the students and believe the work we did will be beneficial for years to come. We hope the students had fun and enjoyed the experience.”Gary is deployed to Central and South America and the Caribbean in support of Operation Martillo and U.S. Fourth Fleet’s mission, Southern Seas 2012.Operation Martillo (Spanish for “hammer”) is a U.S., European and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illicit trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. U.S. military participation is being led by Joint Interagency Task Force (JIATF) South, a component of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM).Operation Martillo is part of the U.S. government’s coordinated regional security strategy in support of the White House strategy to combat transitional organized crime and the U.S. Central America Security Initiative.Fourteen countries are participating: Canada, Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Guatemala, Honduras, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, October 31, 2012 View post tag: Gary View post tag: project View post tag: Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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Senator Tomes Pushes For CBD Oil Legalization

first_imgIL for www.theindianalwyer.com FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare A state senator has filed a bill that would officially legalize the sale and possession of cannabis oil in Indiana.Republican Sen. Jim Tomes of Wadesville filed the bill last week with the goal of making the product readily available throughout the state, WTHR reported.“When we’re done, CBD will be as easy to obtain as baby aspirins,” he said.The proposed legislation clarifies that CBD oil is not included under the term “controlled substance” in Indiana, making the products legal.The bill comes six months after an investigation by the TV station revealed that Indiana State Excise Police confiscated CBD products from dozens of stores statewide and cited them for marijuana possession without the knowledge of the governor’s office, the attorney general or state police.The oil comes from cannabis plants and doesn’t contain THC, which is what causes the “high” that marijuana gives. Tomes said his constituents have told him the oil has improved their medical conditions and reduced their pain without the serious side effects often seen with prescription painkillers.“These are families that have the horror and the anguish of dealing with medical conditions and, if that’s not bad enough, now we’re in a turmoil of what’s going to be legal and what’s not,” Tomes said. “I want this bill to just cut to the chase, just get rid of all of this unknown and just make this product legal for them.”center_img 4last_img read more

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Free Car Washes for All Vets and Military Personnel on Tuesday

first_imgCar Caress, along with more than 2,200 other car wash locations across the nation, will provide free car washes to veterans and current military service personnel from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11.The Grace For Vets FREE Wash Program takes place on Veterans Day (Tuesday, Nov. 11), and washes will be given rain or shine at: Car Caress, 1635 Haven Ave. Ocean City, NJCar Caress II, 100 Stagecoach Road, Marmora, NJ.The free washes are given to honor and recognize those who have or are serving in the armed forces.Grace For Vets was founded by Mike Mountz, former owner of Cloister Wash & Lube, in Ephrata, Pa., in 2004.Mountz vowed to find a way to honor veterans when he served and saw first-hand amputees and the seriously wounded at the Veterans Hospital in Valley Forge, PA.Several years after opening his first car wash, he started the Grace For Vets FREE Wash Program. With the help of car washes across the country who participate, more and more military servicemen and women are recognized each year through this program.“This day is not about the car wash operators who are providing the free washes, it’s about honoring and recognizing those that have and are serving and protecting our country,” Car Caress owner Brian Coggins said. “It’s an exciting and emotional day for everyone. Our management team and employees look forward to giving back to those that have given so much.”For Car Caress locations or to obtain more information, call 609-398-8482or visit www.graceforvets.org.Download (PDF, 318KB)__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alerts“Like” us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Real Bread Campaign loses battle with Allinson

first_imgThe Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has rejected a complaint by the Real Bread Campaign that an advert for Allinson’s bread was misleading. The Real Bread Campaign lodged an objection to the ad, which showed a photo of a sliced, wrapped Allinson loaf underneath a picture of hands kneading dough with the strapline ‘Allinson Today’, in April of this year.It claimed that the image misleadingly implied that Allinson’s bread was made by hand; that the use of the word “wholemeal” in the ad was misleading, because it believed the bread was not made with 100% wholemeal flour; and that the claim “the bread … still has no artificial preservatives” was misleading. However, all of the complaints were today rejected the ASA. Real Bread Campaign coordinator Chris Young said the organisation was “shocked” at the decision.For the full story see the next issue of British Baker, out on 21 September, 2012.last_img read more

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Local Gas Prices Continue To Fall

first_imgMGN ImageJAMESTOWN – Gas prices in the Jamestown area are continuing to fall thanks to decreased demand due to the COVID-19 outbreak.According to GasBuddy.com in Jamestown the average price for a gallon of petrol is $2.17.Area’s to the north the price is even lower. Dunkirk’s average price sits at $2.15, in Irving the price sits under a dollar at .99 cents a gallon.In parts of Salamanca, the price for a regular gallon of gas is only .68 cents. Even with crude oil selling at less than half of what it was in January, and even with a 75 to 80 cent tax advantage in Seneca territory it’s hard to believe this price could even be profitable.Because Seneca businesses are tax-exempt, stations in Salamanca that are selling for as low as 65 cents are still making a few cents profit, owners say. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Honduran security forces battle the Espinoza gang

first_img At any given time, the Espinoza gang has about 40 leaders and key operatives. Most of these are immediate and extended family members. The Espinoza family formed a gang in 2010, according to police. The Espinoza family was involved in a land dispute with another family. Members of the Espinoza family allegedly set fire to several properties owned by the other family. The Espinozas left signs at properties owned by the other family; the signs threatened that anyone who bought property from the family would die. In recent weeks, security forces captured two alleged key members of the Espinoza gang: Gonzalo Luque Ramos, 23, and Samuel Baires Ruiz. Security forces are still looking for alleged gang members Santos Isabel Espinoza Baires, 35; Walter Alexander Espinoza, 22, alias “El Militar”; Junia Espinoza Zúniga, 27; and Santos Priscila Espinoza Zúniga, 38. The Security Ministry is offering 250,000 Lempiras, or the equivalent of a little over $12,000 for information leading to their capture. “Operation Morazán has reduced impunity levels in the country,” says lawyer and security analyst Raúl Pineda Alvarado. “But it has not reduced the level of delinquency yet. The number of crimes has not gone down. What we have today is the largest number of prisoners in Central America, but we need to expand our vision to attack this problem from its inception. This is not only an issue for the police to solve. The police arrives after the commission of a crime, we need to nip it in the bud.” If the authorities took care of the population from the street, neighborhoods or communities, many of these organizations would never be born. The control of every segment, even of families, would be through the population itself, meaning, there would be a higher interrelation with the population. Gang members attack police The Espinoza gang Another battle Honduran police launched an aggressive security initiative in February 2014 to confront the gang and to improve public safety in San Luis and the surrounding region. “Normally we have 20 elements patrolling the zone, but in light of this chaotic, high-risk situation, we decided to send 85 more policemen, and a similar number of military officials additionally.” It wan’t long before alleged gang members attacked security forces. On t he morning of Feb. 10, 2014, suspected gang members attacked a group of police officers who were patrolling the village. “Shots rang from behind, from the front, from everywhere. They were attacked from all sides,” said Commissioner Elder Madrid, Strategic Director for the National Police. One of the attackers was a young boy, about age 12. Police would later spot him in one of the videos the gang made. “Police had seen the boy, but didn’t shoot because he was a child,” even though the boy fired shots at the police, Madrid said. Authorities suspect the boy had seen the police on patrol and had informed gang leaders. “We learned later they were training kids, when we searched the houses they were staying at and found the videos among bullet-proof vests, helmets and other military paraphernalia,” Madrid said. Gang members wounded five police officers. Two of the officers sustained serious wounds. Authorities flew those two officers in a helicopter to a hospital in Tegucigalpa. The suspected gang members, including the boy, escaped through coffee plantations and dense bush, officials said. A trail of blood indicated that some of them were wounded. center_img By Dialogo March 20, 2014 A few days after police and the military increased their patrols, security forces in San Luis engaged in a gun battle with five suspected members of Los Espinozas. The security forces killed Darwin Rafael Espinoza, 25. Police sent in reinforcements as part of a security initiative known as “Operation Morazán.” Within days, police engaged in another gun battle with suspected Los Espinozas gang members. Security forces killed José Gerónimo Espinoza, 23, an alleged gang leader who was known as “El Chambo.” Police Director Sabillón described the gang leaders’ way of thinking: “This criminal group says: I was born here, I grew here, here is where I will die.” That is exactly what is happening, authorities said. Honduran security forces are waging a fierce battle with the Espinoza organized crime group in San Luis, a small village in a mountainous region of the department of Comayagua. Dozens of heavily-armed members of the Espinoza gang streamed into the village in 2013, apparently intent on taking over the village, which is in the central part of the country. Dressed in camouflage military-style clothing and fake or stolen police uniforms, the gang members invaded San Luis and other nearby villages, terrorizing residents with handguns and AK-47s. In February 2014, police released three videos the gang made. The videos show several gang members displaying their weapons as Mexican narcocorridos blast on the radio. In some of the video scenes, the men dance to Brazilian music with rifles slung over their shoulders. One video shows a pregnant girl who may have been held as a sexual slave, authorities said. Police Director Ramón Sabillón said in a recent press conference, “one of those videos shows children in training, learning to use firearms.” The gang members – many of whom belong to the Espinoza family – set fire to some of the homes that residents left behind and took over other houses. The Espinoza gang engages in extortion, theft, kidnapping and murder. Authorities suspect the gang collaborates with transnational criminal organizations, such as the Sinaloa Cartel, to traffic drugs. The Espinoza gang uses narcocorridos – songs which romanticize drug trafficking – to recruit children and teenagers, authorities have said. The gang is commonly known as Los Espinozas. last_img read more

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Peru Inaugurates Emergency Response Complex with Help from SOUTHCOM

first_imgThe complex also has an early alert system; radio communication equipment; a 100 kilowatt generator that can self-supply electricity; automated systems at the doors of the main entrance and at those of the warehouse; an anti-fire system; and latest generation computers. The COER also has a crisis room, a meeting room, a communications center, coordination offices, training areas where rescue operations are practiced, and areas for care. By Dialogo June 09, 2016 Peru recently inaugurated the Regional Complex for Disaster Preparation and Response in the region of La Libertad. The installation cost more than $2 million and was financed by U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). The complex will help personnel be prepared for natural disasters. The cooperative relationship between Peru and the United States – primarily between the two countries’ militaries – is yielding positive results. “Relations between Peru and SOUTHCOM are at an optimal level. SOUTHCOM’s own representatives have shown that the Regional Emergency Operations Centers (COER) being built moving forward will follow this new model inspired by the experience of those in La Libertad,” said Saldarriaga. The venue is made up of a regional emergency operations center (COER), a regional humanitarian aid warehouse, and a training center/camp. The COER requests, obtains, and shares information concerning developing hazards, emergencies, and disasters or imminent dangers in order to assist in the decision making process. The Regional Humanitarian Aid Warehouse gathers goods to distribute to families stricken by unavoidable dangers, emergencies, or disasters and, in terms of supplies, prioritizes roofing supplies, shelter, food, and tools. SOUTHCOM has constructed 18 units to improve the response capabilities of local authorities throughout the country. SOUTHCOM assistance Now that the COER is in operation, the people of La Libertad district “will be able to sleep peacefully because monitoring of all risks will happen at all hours of the day,” said the regional governor of La Libertad, Luis Valdez, during the complex’s inaugural ceremony, reported the online newspaper TrujilloInforma. After the inauguration, three types of demonstrations were held to showcase emergency response tactics: a rescue in a confined space; repelling with ropes; and a rescue from collapsed structures. Early warning system On May 6th, Peruvian website Trujillo reported that this unit will work on a mutual aid plan with the regions of Tumbes, Lambayeque, Ancash, Cajamarca, and Piura (among others). In addition, there will also be training for those in charge of the District Emergency Operations Centers (COED). These personnel must also replicate the same work for their districts. Responding to a disaster not only requires “us to be prepared and trained for it. If we do not also have humanitarian aid goods that can be distributed to the people and communities affected by the disaster, we cannot save lives or recover towns that are damaged as a result of a disaster,” said Saldarriaga. center_img Monitoring risks The complex was inaugurated at a ceremony held on May 17th and was attended by several U.S. and Peruvian officials, including U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Robert Storer, deputy chief of the Navy Section at the Office of Security Cooperation in Lima; Hilda Cruz, program coordinator, and regional Governor of la Libertad Luis Valdez. Miguel Ángel Saldarriaga, director of the National Institute of Civil Defense (INDECI) in La Libertad, told Diálogo, “Building this complex represents a dedication to having a greater intervention on behalf of the Armed Forces during emergency situations. Peru is located in a part of the world that is extremely vulnerable to the threats posed by earthquakes and, therefore, tsunamis. [So,] this represents important aid to be able to tackle the tasks of disaster prevention, preparation, and appropriate response .” Since 2009, SOUTHCOM, by way of its HAP, “has has invested more than $20 million in health systems, education, and disaster management in Peru. These projects are truly cooperative efforts that not only strengthen Peru’s capacity, but also the bonds of friendship between two partner nations,” Lt. Cmdr. Robert Storer told Diálogo. The authorities associated with HAP generally work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to facilitate the implementation of these projects in Peru. “This third component is of particular importance for the Deputy Management of Civil Defense of La Libertad’s regional government because it signifies the ability to intensely train children, teenagers, and other young people by way of universities and other educational institutions in a way that we can raise new generations imbued with a culture of prevention and proper disaster risk management,” said Saldarriaga, “It also gives us the opportunity to train first responders in how to efficiently perform their work.” “The warehouse on the complex can store 5,000 humanitarian aid kits. There are 20 people who can intervene operationally in case of emergencies. Information, training, and storage for humanitarian relief goods are among the services that the complex provides to the Armed Forces,” said Saldarriaga. On April 19th, SOUTHCOM dedicated approximately $2 million to the construction and equipping of an operations center and warehouse in the region of Loreto in order to help Peru improve its disaster response abilities, according to news agency Andina. SOUTHCOM had already contributed to the construction of a regional humanitarian aid warehouse in Tacna in December 2015 for the equipment that other governmental agencies need in order to respond during times of natural disasters. Thanks to SOUTHCOM’s Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP), the center was built over 4,000 square meters of land donated by the regional government of La Libertad and located on the northern Pan-American Highway in the town of El Milagro, Huanchaco district. Emergency Operations Center and morelast_img read more

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Brazilian Army Delivers Water to Drought Affected Regions

first_imgBy Patrícia Comunello/Diálogo April 17, 2018 Operations from the Brazilian Army (EB, in Portuguese) are vital to thousands of residents in cities suffering the effects of the worst drought in recent years in southern Brazil’s Rio Grande do Sul state. “A person can go 10 days without food, but more than three days without water puts your life at risk. That’s why communities welcomed us with joy when we arrived here with water,” said EB Lieutenant Colonel Jetson Machado da Silva, commander of the 4th Logistics Battalion (BLog, in Portuguese) of the 6th Armored Infantry Brigade, located in Santa Maria in central Rio Grande do Sul. The battalion is one of the arms EB extends since February 2018 to assist the state’s Civil Defense agency in mitigating the problems the drought created. Scarce rainfall began in December 2017 and intensified in the first three months of 2018. Municipalities in the southern part of the state—cities along the border between Uruguay and Argentina—still feel the effect. “On a Thursday, we received a request from the town council of Caçapava do Sul, one of the most affected cities 260 kilometers from Porto Alegre, the capital of the state of Rio Grande do Sul. On Friday, we sought further details from the authorities. We then did some ground reconnaissance on Monday, and, by Tuesday, our troops were already headed there, trucking water by road to cater to families,” Lt. Col. Jetson explained. The 4th BLog operated from February until March 27th, bringing water to residents in nearly 20 rural parts of Caçapava do Sul. “A lot of those places are hard to reach, and the bridges are rickety. We brought water to poor families and even upper middle-class families,” Lt. Col. Jetson said. The work of service members involved two weekly activities. They filled up the battalion’s two water trucks—one with an 18,000-liter capacity and the other holding 15,000 liters of water—at reservoirs of the Rio Grande Sanitation Company supplied. Trucks were then dispatched to communities. Town councils furnished the fuel for the vehicles. “Wherever there’s a water canister, we fill it. Our troops happily carry out this mission. It’s not our top priority, but it’s the kind of assistance we always provide to Civil Defense,” Lt. Col. Jetson said. “This kind of initiative properly illustrates two of EB’s values: a strong arm and a helping hand. In northern Brazil, for instance, we have Operation Water Truck [Pipa, in Portuguese], and we assist here as much as we can when called upon,” he added. According to the Civil Defense agency, the weather phenomenon led 24 cities in Rio Grande do Sul—541,000 residents in all—to declare a state of emergency. The agency reported that the economic damage is estimated at $294 million, according to figures from the Rural Space Technical Assistance Company. The greatest economic losses occur with grain crops such as soy, the area’s primary product. Bagé, the city closest to the border with Uruguay, was hit hardest by the 2018 drought. Its 122,000 residents have no end-date in sight for water rationing. People in the neighborhoods and rural areas go through periods with and without water. Authorities conduct the rationing12 hours a day, but EB’s helping hand is present throughout the region. “We’ll continue to help for as long as the drought lasts,” said Brazilian Major General José Ricardo Vendramin Nunes, commander of the 3rd Mechanized Cavalry Brigade (3ª Bda C. Mec, in Portuguese), headquartered in Bagé. “Whenever there’s a crisis, such as with water scarcity, we have prior authorization to act,” Maj. Gen. Vendramin explained, adding that the force also operates in floods. “These are the resources the Army placed at the service of the population.” Water scarcity affected territories with large tracts of land used for farming and raising livestock. Maj. Gen. Vendramin said EB’s water trucks cover up to 60 kilometers in one day. “The lack of water keeps many children home from school in rural areas.” The 3rd BLog of Bagé, connected to the 3ª Bda C. Mec, also provides relief to residents of neighboring municipalities like Hulha Negra, Candiota, and Pedras Altas. Reservoirs managed by the Bagé Municipal Water, Streams, and Sewage Department, hold the water. “In five Bagé neighborhoods alone, 30,000 people a day benefit from one of our water trucks, with a capacity to transport 24,000 liters,” Maj. Gen. Vendramin said. “Natural disasters hit this region of Rio Grande do Sul the hardest,” said EB Major Rinaldo da Silva Castro, who serves in the General Staff of the State Military Brigade and commands the 6th Civil Defense and Regional Protection Coordination Unit. Maj. Castro referred to a 70-square-kilometer area—equivalent to 25 percent of the territory of Rio Grande do Sul—affected most by the droughts of March or where conditions still persist. “Municipalities don’t have these vehicles [water trucks], and they aren’t experienced in dealing with the harsh terrain of the interior,” said Maj. Castro. “Today, the Army is the best prepared federal entity to help during disaster events. That’s why this service agency is essential. Without this help, it would be difficult to get water, a fundamental resource for survival, out to the communities.” EB engaged in another relief effort in July 2017, during the worst flooding in the last 20 years of the Uruguay River and its tributaries, on the border with Argentina. “The Army helped us evacuate residents from their flooded homes, set up humanitarian shelters and even place mobile patrols out in the country with doctors to treat sick patients in different places,” Maj. Castro said. “The Army provided tremendous assistance. I hope the force will always remain at the ready.”last_img read more

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Female Commander Seizes a Ton of Cocaine

first_imgBy Yolima Dussán / Diálogo April 21, 2020 On her first day as commander of the Colombian Navy Pacific Naval Force’s Coastal Patrol Vessel ARC José María Palas (PM-103), Lieutenant Yerliza Rodríguez coordinated a maritime interdiction, on February 1, 2020.After receiving relevant intelligence, Lt. Rodríguez deployed an operation at the mouth of the Naya River, Valle del Cauca department, where authorities intercepted a vessel, seized a ton of cocaine hydrochloride and 500 gallons of fuel, and captured three members of the remnant armed group E30, consisting of former members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC, in Spanish).“I’m part of the solution; I’m on the positive-thinking side. I firmly believe that we will achieve our goals only if we do the right thing,” Lt. Rodríguez, the first woman in the Colombian Navy to serve as commander of a patrol vessel in the Pacific, told Diálogo. This mission deprived the criminal structure of $33 million, the Navy told the press.Lt.. Rodríguez deployed to Antarctica to provide logistics support for research project development, on board the ship ARC 20 de Julio, between 2018 and 2019. (Photo: Colombian Navy)Five days later, Lt. Rodríguez and the 22 crew members aboard the PM-103 seized 441 pounds of marijuana in the Pacific. “The fight is frantic,” she added. “We never stop; counternarcotics operations are constant.”In 2008, Rodríguez, who was only 15, enrolled in the Admiral Padilla Naval Academy. It was a tremendous feat for her family, originally from Quibdó in Chocó department, a region known for poor living conditions, extreme insecurity, and criminal groups that ravage the community.“In 2011, I got a degree in Naval Sciences and became one of the 35,000 service members that make up the Colombian Navy,” Lt. Rodríguez said. “Now I’m part of the forces that fight the evils in my region.”After 13 years of service, she says this was the best decision she’s made.Her gender, she says, was not important during her training. “I’m not treated better or worse for being a woman,” Lt. Rodríguez says. “We are trained and are expected to give our best; they expect the same from us as from men. With gender inclusion, the armed forces have made a lot of progress.”The Navy has 1,078 women. “This has to do with our advances in integrating military women,” said Colombian Navy Rear Admiral John Fabio Giraldo, commander of the Pacific Naval Force. “We started an internal process that aims at making space for them in special operations commands, with very good results.”Standing out at every stage of her career prepares Lt. Rodríguez for important missions. Between 2018 and 2019, she deployed with the 5th Colombian scientific mission to Antarctica to provide logistics support for research project development on board the ship ARC 20 de Julio (PZE-46).Lt. Rodríguez is part of a process of opening up that started in 1984, when the first women joined the Navy. “Every mission I take part in helps me adopt a wider vision of the responsibility I have taken on for my country,” she said.With increasingly active gender inclusion, the Colombian Navy is moving forward to consolidate and have a comprehensive force with women who will play a decisive role in the armed forces of the future. “It’s teamwork, because I couldn’t do anything, even with all the energy and the willingness, if it weren’t for my cohesive crew,” Lt. Rodríguez concluded.last_img read more

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