Letters

first_imgThis week’s lettersFractals and the chaos theoryI write with regard to one of the questions raised towards the end of the OHconference in Edinburgh regarding the role of the occupational health nurse. Itseems some confusion and complexity exists as to what is taught on the courseand the application of such within the actual work environment where the (OHN)practices in relation to role. I think we have to accept that the role is dynamic and changing; it moveswith the pulse of the organisation or work culture. Nevertheless, this questionactually made me think of the correct definition of the OHN. The original definition has stood for more than 50 years and was defined ata meeting between doctors and representatives of the World Health Organisationin Geneva in 1950. In summary it basically states that OHNs ensure health isnot damaged by work. Due to changes in the work environment and in work culture I think thedefinition of the role should also change. It would be difficult to define allthe skills an OHN has or to list them all. That would be an essay in itself.This brings me to my interest in fractals and chaos theory and the use of theseterms in trying to define the OHN. So what are fractals? Fractals can be anything that contain self-similarimages within itself. For example, the body’s circulatory system is a fractal.If you look at the blood vessels in your hand, they represent the overall shapethe system takes on. A mathematician would conclude that fractals are createdat the boundary between chaos and order. Chaos theory states that everything is subject to so many variables that itbecomes almost, but not completely, random. There is no way of predicting allthe variables (reflecting on the OHN role) and anticipating what is going tohappen next, because any small change can be amplified until it has a largerimpact on other things within the role. There are billions of variables but fractals are not completely chaotic,they do have an order that keeps them from being totally chaotic or totallyorderly. I think, therefore, the dynamic ever-changing role of the occupationalhealth nurse has to be defined as a fractal as the role cannot be definitivelydefined. I hope I have clarified some of the complexity. John Walker Student, Glasgow Caledonian UniversityAre bad manners the norm?Recently I have been short-listed for two Occupational Health posts. In both cases a period of more than four weeks has passed without anynotification from either of the companies. I take it that I have beenunsuccessful. I have travelled a total of 150 miles for one interview and used two daysholiday between the two applications. I am now wondering if it was really worththe effort. I am interested to find out if anyone else has experienced this problem andis it now the norm for companies only to contact the successful candidate? Name and address withheld LettersOn 1 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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When your horse is dead, just dismount

first_imgLet me state the case clearly. Most current employer branding modelspasteurise organisations of their complexity. They misrepresent what they areand what they stand for. Look about you. The recruitment marketing world is full to overflowing withaggressively promoted ’employer brands’, constructed around loudly proclaimed‘value propositions’ and set within rigorously policed frameworks of ‘brandguidelines’. Sadly, they tend to bore us today in much the same way as grandmission statements bored us a decade ago. They are becoming ineffective atdifferentiating one employer from another. This stems in part from the excessive reliance on focus group research indeveloping employer branding strategies. These tend to generate numbinglypredictable conclusions. The fact is, we live in a world of similar companies,employing similar people, often coming up with broadly similar ideas. Put themthrough focus groups and you get similar branding propositions. This is compounded by a tendency to see employer branding as primarily acommunications issue. It isn’t. While branding is about the coherentorchestration of visual, verbal and positional elements, it is also aboutbehaviour. The way you treat your staff, the way they treat each other, the wayyou all treat your customers – these are the nodes around which your brandcredibility is structured. These elements are not only in perpetual motion; they are in dialogue withthe wider society as well as each other. The result is a relational dynamicthat forces us to look at the brand, not as a stable entity with clear edges,but as a centre of gravity around which revolve continuously changingenvironmental, cultural, economic and political forces. Clearly, employer branding does not come about by central planning. While itcan and should be driven by the pursuit of specific goals, it is inherently organicin its evolution. It is part choreography and part inspiration. It can beinfluenced but not prescribed. It is subject to random accidents, circumstancesand coincidences. Witness the 53 per cent of the companies on the 1980 Fortune500 list that are no longer in business. Employer branding is more intervention than revelation, more emotionallydriven than rationally informed, more about what we do than what we say, andmore about inventing the future than reflecting the past. Until we take theseobservations on board – and challenge the comfortable simplifications ofcurrent practice – employer branding projects will continue to take the form ofcompany managers addressing their own navels in terms that mean little toaudiences either inside or outside the company walls. That may be very profitable for advertising agencies. It is very bad forbusiness. By Shaun D’Arcy, Partner, Lighthouse Adcomms Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article When your horse is dead, just dismountOn 7 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

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DISCOVERY 2010: Spatial and temporal variability in a dynamic polar ecosystem

first_imgThe Scotia Sea has been a focus of biological- and physical oceanographic study since the Discovery expeditions in the early 1900s. It is a physically energetic region with some of the highest levels of productivity in the Southern Ocean. It is also a region within which there have been greater than average levels of change in upper water column temperature. We describe the results of three cruises transecting the central Scotia Sea from south to north in consecutive years and covering spring, summer and autumn periods. We also report on some community level syntheses using both current-day and historical data from this region. A wide range of parameters were measured during the field campaigns, covering the physical oceanography of the region, air–sea CO2 fluxes, macro- and micronutrient concentrations, the composition and biomass of the nano-, micro- and mesoplankton communities, and the distribution and biomass of Antarctic krill and mesopelagic fish. Process studies examined the effect of iron-stress on the physiology of primary producers, reproduction and egestion in Antarctic krill and the transfer of stable isotopes between trophic layers, from primary consumers up to birds and seals. Community level syntheses included an examination of the biomass-spectra, food-web modelling, spatial analysis of multiple trophic layers and historical species distributions. The spatial analyses in particular identified two distinct community types: a northern warmer water community and a southern cold community, their boundary being broadly consistent with the position of the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF). Temperature and ice cover appeared to be the dominant, over-riding factors in driving this pattern. Extensive phytoplankton blooms were a major feature of the surveys, and were persistent in areas such as South Georgia. In situ and bioassay measurements emphasised the important role of iron inputs as facilitators of these blooms. Based on seasonal DIC deficits, the South Georgia bloom was found to contain the strongest seasonal carbon uptake in the ice-free zone of the Southern Ocean. The surveys also encountered low-production, iron-limited regions, a situation more typical of the wider Southern Ocean. The response of primary and secondary consumers to spatial and temporal heterogeneity in production was complex. Many of the life-cycles of small pelagic organisms showed a close coupling to the seasonal cycle of food availability. For instance, Antarctic krill showed a dependence on early, non-ice-associated blooms to facilitate early reproduction. Strategies to buffer against environmental variability were also examined, such as the prevalence of multiyear life-cycles and variability in energy storage levels. Such traits were seen to influence the way in which Scotia Sea communities were structured, with biomass levels in the larger size classes being higher than in other ocean regions. Seasonal development also altered trophic function, with the trophic level of higher predators increasing through the course of the year as additional predator-prey interactions emerged in the lower trophic levels. Finally, our studies re-emphasised the role that the simple phytoplankton-krill-higher predator food chain plays in this Southern Ocean region, particularly south of the SACCF. To the north, alternative food chains, such as those involving copepods, macrozooplankton and mesopelagic fish, were increasingly important. Continued ocean warming in this region is likely to increase the prevalence of such alternative such food chains with Antarctic krill predicted to move southwards.last_img read more

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HNLMS Van Amstel Delivers Supplies to WFP Protection Team

first_img View post tag: Van View post tag: Naval View post tag: delivers On Sunday 27 May EU Naval Force (EU NAVFOR) Dutch frigate Van Amstel rendezvoused  at sea with World Food Programme (WFP) chartered ship MV Caroline Scan to re-supply the Dutch protection team onboard – known as an Autonomous Vessel Protection Detachment or AVPD .    The Dutch AVPD, which consists of armed marines and a medical team,  protects the humanitarian food of the WFP as it transits the waters off the Somali coast.  The AVPD sails under the flag of the European Union counter piracy mission – Operation Atalanta.The use of AVPDs  to protect WFP shipping is paramount for  the EU NAVFOR as it allows greater flexibility in the use of the warships in the fight against piracy, whilst guaranteeing the security of  WFP shipments.  M/V Caroline Scan regularly  transports  tonnes of food for the World Food Programme from Mombasa (Kenya) and Mogadishu to Bosaso and Berbera.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , May 29, 2012; Image: eunavfor HNLMS Van Amstel Delivers Supplies to WFP Protection Team View post tag: Amstel View post tag: Navy View post tag: team View post tag: protectioncenter_img View post tag: HNLMS View post tag: WFP View post tag: supplies May 29, 2012 Back to overview,Home naval-today HNLMS Van Amstel Delivers Supplies to WFP Protection Team View post tag: News by topic Share this articlelast_img read more

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Brian Lara to speak at the Oxford Union

first_imgIt’s a week until the official Union speaker release and the hacks are no good at keeping secrets. Here’s eight speakers to whet your appetite. For the full, accurate and confirmed term card, check out the first Cherwell of term which comes out on Friday.1. Brian LaraThis news hit us for six. Widely acknowledged as one of the greatest batsmen ever, the former West Indian international player was the first person to ever score a quintuple hundred. [mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%11483%%[/mm-hide-text]2. Hilary SwankIt’s the million dollar baby herself. World-renowned actress and producer, Swank is best known for her roles in Million Dollar Baby, Boys Don’t Cry and PS I Love You.[mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%11481%%[/mm-hide-text]3. Alexandra ShulmanHot on the heels of Anna Wintour, her British counterpart is next to grace the halls of the Union this term.[mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%11482%%[/mm-hide-text]4. Piers MorganLooks like he’s been deported back to the UK after all. Love or hate him, maybe we’ll get to hear his life story for once.[mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%11480%%[/mm-hide-text]5. DynamoHe’s not quite Jesus but he can walk on water. In 2011 the self-proclaimed magician impossible was photographed and videotaped apparently walking on the River Thames. What will he do at the Union? [mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%11484%%[/mm-hide-text]6. Nicola BenedettiEnchanting and dynamic, this Scottish violinist has enthralled audiences since the age of 13. [mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%11485%%[/mm-hide-text]7. Warwick DavisBest known for his roles in Star Wars, The Leprechaun, Harry Potter and Willow, Davis has historically been very open about his struggles with dwarfism and raising a family. [mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%11486%%[/mm-hide-text]8. Bill MaherA host on HBO, this American stand-up comedian is a satirist, writer, producer, political commentator, television host, actor, media critic, and stand-up comedian all rolled into one. [mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%11487%%[/mm-hide-text]last_img read more

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“Doctor Faustus” comes to Hoboken and Secaucus Library

first_img1 / 2  Sean P. McCullough as Mephistopheles and Zach Hendrickson as Doctor Faustus  2 / 2  Sean P. McCullough as Mephistopheles and Zach Hendrickson as Doctor Faustus ❮ ❯ ×  1 / 2  Sean P. McCullough as Mephistopheles and Zach Hendrickson as Doctor Faustus  2 / 2  Sean P. McCullough as Mephistopheles and Zach Hendrickson as Doctor Faustus ❮ ❯ Now as we creep into the Halloween season, Hudson Shakespeare Company of Jersey City, returns with “Doctor Faustus” by Christopher Marlowe touring to South River Library. Admission is free.The performances are Thursday, Oct.17 at 7 p.m. at theSecaucus Library, 1379 Paterson Plank Rd., Secaucus, and Thursday Oct. 24 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hoboken Library500 Park Ave, Hoboken.center_img “Doctor Faustus” is a classic drama of a man who sells his soul to the Devil for ultimate knowledge and power, an over-looked gem from Shakespeare’s period, written by a rival playwright and his possible collaborator, Christopher Marlowe.“Its an extremely theatrical script that’s perfect for Halloween full of music, devils, angels, sword fights, and dances”, said Jon Ciccarelli, the show’s director.Doctor Faustus (Zach Hendrickson) has been a scholar and professor at the University of Wertenberg, Germany for many years and has mastered all areas of study from medicine to the law and religious studies. Now he seeks the ultimate challenge, delving into the occult so he can learn the true mysteries of the universe and become master of it.Clandestinely, he employs the help of two mystics simply known as Valdes (Sabrina Fara Tosti) and Cornelia (AshleyRobyn Patten) to assist him. Faustus is instructed to conduct a séance to summon Mephistopheles (Sean P. McCullough).Mephistopheles, with horns and wings, dramatically appears and informs Faust that all he desires can be obtained if hesigns a contract with Lucifer. Once signed, Mephistopheles will become his personal servant conjuring anything andtaking him wherever he wants. Faust, ever the lawyer, writes up his version of the agreement and the bond is sealed.Mephistopheles creates visions of sex, riches, and desires, but Faust’s main interest is knowing the nature of Hell, and the nature of existence, constantly quizzing the frustrated demon.The pair go traveling around the world, from Rome to Turkey and other points, however, even as Faust enjoys his new found fame as a mystic he begins to question his contract. His own personal Good Angel (MadisonWright) and Bad Angel (Arielle Legere) literally fight for Faust’s soul. As the years pass and each magical display occurs, a physical toll is taken on Faustus. Can he repent in time and save himself or is bound down the path he has chosen?“The act of selling of one’s soul for personal gain is an ever popular screen trope that even predates Marlowe’s play,” said Ciccarelli, “but this version presents Faust as very human as opposed to a mustache twirling villain. He has a genuine curiosity of what he can’t learn in books and continually questions the demons and angels that surround him about what they are and what it means to be good or evil. The show presents a great picture of a man who’s full of regret, has humor, arrogance, and wit, flaws and all mixed with a high level of theatricality.”The Hudson Shakespeare Company of Jersey City is a touring theater company founded in 1992 and has produced over 100 classical and modern productions for parks, libraries, and other civic venues. “Doctor Faustus” marks the end of its 28th touring season.For more information on this tour or to view information on the company and past productions visitwww.hudsonshakesepare.com.last_img read more

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South Jersey Track & Field Hall of Fame Inducts Two Members from the Ocean…

first_imgWilliam MorelandOCEAN CITY, NJ- Ocean City High School’s William Moreland and John Richardson are being inducted into the South Jersey Track & Field Hall of Fame Class of 2016 for their excellent achievements in athletics.On March 20th, 2016, the South Jersey Track & Field Hall of Fame will hold a banquet for newly initiated members at Lucien’s Manor in Berlin, NJ. The banquet starts with a reception at 4:30PM, followed by dinner at 5:30PM. Each inductee will be introduced by the Master of Ceremonies and have the opportunity to give a short speech. New members will receive a Hall of Fame ring.The association was formed in 1970 to support high school track & field and cross country organizations in South Jersey. They organize South Jersey school competitions for cross country, indoor and outdoor track, as well as sponsor end-of-year season awards banquets. The Hall of Fame was founded in 2005 in order to honor the incredible athletes, coaches, officials, and supporters in the South Jersey track & field and cross country community. There are currently 109 members instated in the Hall of Fame, which holds an initiation banquet every year with around two to three hundred guests in attendance.William “Bill” Moreland, a recently retired teacher and coach, is known for his dedication and talent for developing some of South Jersey’s finest runners (John Richardson, Brett Johnson and Mile Schoedler, Brittany Sedberry, Renee Tomlin, and Devon Grisbaum) and winning many State Sectional and State Group titles. Graduating from Abington High School, he later attended Elizabethtown College for his Bachelor’s degree and the University of Delaware for his Master’s. He began teaching mathematics and coaching spring and winter track and cross country at Ocean City in 1979. For his 35 years of employment there, Bill never once took a sick day. He has also never missed a day of running in the past 40 years. Bill retired in 2008 and is married with two daughters. He can still be seen running the island every morning.John Richardson graduated from Ocean City High School in 2003 and is one of the greatest middle distance runners in South Jersey history. While running for Ocean City, he achieved an unmatched double victory in the 800 and 1600 at the 2003 New Jersey Spring Meet of Champions. He also took home a victory at the Penn Relays High SchoolMile in April 2003. He continued his success at the University of Kentucky, becoming the third South Jersey runner to run a sub-four-minute mile.Ocean City has had three other members previously inducted into the Hall of Fame. Archie Harris (Discus 1937) was inducted in the Class of 2008, while Coach Mike Naples and Melody Sye O’Reilly (Middle Distance 1984) were seen in the Class of 2011.To attend the South Jersey Hall of Fame Banquet, contact the Committee Chairman, Bill Collins, at (856) 381-7763 or [email protected] to make a reservation. Reservations are required. The cost is $50 per person, or $20 for children under 12.John Richardsonlast_img read more

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Food in the news

first_imgPhotographs of a McDonald’s Happy Meal taken every day for six months, by American artist Sally Davies, revealed that the burger, bun and fries had not started showing even the first signs of mould, reported The Daily Mail. Davies said that at six months old, the food felt plastic to the touch and had an acrylic sheen to it.New research by Unilever has revealed that engine noise on planes may affect travellers’ enjoyment of the food served. Blind tasting revealed the louder the noise, the less acute the sense of the sweetness and saltiness of the food.An article in The Express recently highlighted how little British people know about when fruit and vegetables are in season, and even how they grow. The survey of 14,000 people, commissioned by fresh fruit and vegetable supplier From My Farm revealed that one in 10 people think strawberries grow on trees and one in 12 think Brussels sprouts do too.Sainsbury’s chief executive Justin King reportedly “slammed” the British education system for leaving supermarkets short of potential employees, according to The Telegraph. King was reported as saying that many of the places on courses such as food technology which are vital to supermarkets are populated by students from overseas, which leads to the skills being exported.last_img read more

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The Tennis Academy at Harvard provides tennis instruction for all ages

first_imgThe Tennis Academy at Harvard (TAH), which offers summer instruction for children and adults, will start its third season on June 14 at the Soldiers Field Athletic Complex.Junior camps include 10 one-week camps from June 14 through Aug. 20. Though campers can sign up for multiple weeks, each Monday through Friday session is a complete unit.This season, TAH is offering something for every age with the following programs:Tennis Tykes (ages 4 to 6)Super Tykes (ages 6 to 7)Juniors (ages 7 to 12)Junior Elite Training Program (ages 11 to 12)Elite Training Program (ages 13 to 17)TAH will also offer adult classes on weekday evenings and weekends for both recreational and elite players, from June 14 to Aug. 20. Discounts are available for Harvard employees until Feb. 15.For more information, visit thetennisacademy.com.last_img read more

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Social mission and profit: Chris Hughes looks to blend journalism, new media

first_imgIn purchasing The New Republic, Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder, said he not only wants to help stabilize the financially troubled magazine by 2015 but to put the publication in the service of a wider mission.“It’s a double bottom-line business,” he told Alex Jones, director of the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, as part of a conversation at the Harvard Kennedy School on Tuesday. Hughes said that the magazine will have both a “social mission” and the longer-term goal of profitability, and it will use a variety of social media strategies to accomplish both.Asked if the journalistic focus of the magazine will change, he noted that it will shift away from “opinion journalism” to more reported articles. The goal is to fill a “hole in the marketplace” – somewhere between the churn of the daily news cycle and magazine outlets that focus more on long-form storytelling, he said.From a strategic editorial and technology perspective, Hughes said, the key is to “have our editorial staff continue to engage in the content” after the stories are initially published. “The conversation that continues after the piece is where a lot of the impact can happen.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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