Date set for Ralepelle and Basson hearing

first_imgThe players tested positive for the prohibited stimulant methylhexaneamine following the Test against Ireland in Dublin on November 6, 2010.Both players were provisionally suspended from all rugby activities under IRB regulations until the resolution of the case. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Springbok Chiliboy RalepelleA Judicial Committee appointed by the South African Rugby Union will investigate the anti-doping case of Springboks Bjorn Basson and Chiliboy Ralepelle in Cape Town on January 25.The committee comprises Advocate Jannie Lubbe (chairman), Dr George van Dugteren and Advocate Rob Stelzner.last_img

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London Welsh match-day announcer heading to Broadway

first_img“While we are doing the previews we’ll be rehearsing the show during the day, and they’ll gage what the American audience understand and what they don’t understand,” added David. “They can’t Americanize it, because it’s about England but they will maybe adapt certain phrases.”Jerusalem took the West End by storm in 2009 at the Royal Court theatre and again in 2010 when it switched to the Apollo Theatre Directed by Ian Rickson, Jerusalem was named Best Play at the Evening Standard Awards in November 2009, while Rylance won an Olivier Award for Best Actor for his brilliant performance as Johnny Byron.David was born in Merthyr Tydfil and gave up a career as a teacher to become an actor. His credits include Wimbledon with Paul Bettany, The Painted Veil with Ed Norton and Naomi Watts, Death Defying Acts with Catherine Zeta Jones and Guy Pearce and The Oxford Murders with John Hurt and Elijah Wood. Video of the day thumbnail LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS London Welsh will have to make do without match-day announcer Alan David for the rest of the season, as he jets off to New York to star on Broadway.The 63-year-old actor will reprise his role as The Professor for a second time in Jez Butterworth’s acclaimed and award winning production Jerusalem at New York’s Music Box theatre. David, who is in his fourth season as match-day announcer at London Welsh RFC, will not fly out to New York until March 27.But the demands of rehearsals mean he will miss the Dragons’ push for promotion in the Championship play-offs, which gets underway next Saturday against Nottingham at Old Deer Park (12:35pm) in front of the Sky Sports cameras. Previews at the Music Box theatre begin from April 2 with opening night set for April 21. The production runs until July 21.“I’m really excited; it will be wonderful. I love America; I’ve been many times but the last time was ten years ago, so I’m really looking forward to it,” said David. “I’ll miss my family, although they will be coming out, and I’ll really miss doing the end of the season at London Welsh, because I so enjoy doing it. My son Harry will keep me informed!”Set on St George’s Day, Jerusalem is a comic, contemporary tale of life in our green and pleasant land. Butterworth’s play tells the story of modern day pied piper and local waster, Johnny Byron [Mark Rylance].Bryon is a wanted man; the council want to serve him an eviction notice, his children want him to take them to the fair, Troy Whitworth wants to give him a serious kicking and his motley crew of mates want his ample supply of drugs and alcohol. He is perhaps best known, though, for his role as Llewellyn in John Sullivan’s The Green Green Grass – the spin-off from Only Fools and Horses which ran for four series.David theatrical style behind the microphone has established himself a firm fan’s favourite at Old Deer Park, along with his occasional bloopers, which include renaming London Welsh wing Liam Gibson, Liam Neeson.last_img read more

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Goosen picked ahead of Steyn

first_img Starter for 10: The Cheetah’s fly-half has pipped Morne Steyne to the 10 shirt and notches up his first senior startHEYNEKE MEYER has handed Cheetah’s fly-half Johan Goosen his first Test start, picking the former Baby Bok over an out-of-form Morne Steyn, against Australia in Pretoria on Saturday.Etzebeth is back in the Springbok team after missing the previous Test due to suspension,  and will pair up with Andries Bekker in the middle row.On the bench there’s four changes with Coenie Oosthuizen returning from injury, Flip van der Merwe swapping places with Bekker, plus Jantjies and Taute.“I’ve maintained from the outset that I won’t rush Johan, but I feel he is now ready to start a Test for South Africa and I’m excited to see what he can bring,” said Meyer.“Morné (Steyn), in the last four seasons, has played close to 140 matches at Test, Vodacom Super Rugby and Absa Currie Cup level and probably deserves a break, but this also provides a great opportunity for Johan, a player I rate very highly. Starting XV:15. Zane Kirchner, 14. Bryan Habana, 13. Jean de Villiers (C), 12. Frans Steyn/Jaco Taute, 11. Frans Hougaard, 10. Johan Goosen, 9. Ruan Pienaar, 1. Tendai Mtawarira, 2. Adriaan Strauss, 3. Jannie du Plessis, 4. Eben Etzebeth, 5. Andries Bekker, 6. Francois Louw, 7. Willem Alberts, 8. Duane VermeulenReplacements:16. Tiaan Lebenberg, 17. Coenie Oosthuizen, 18. Flip van der Merwe, 19. Marcell Coetzee, 20. Elton Jantjies, 21. Jaco Taute/Juan de Jongh, 22 Pat Lambie “Morné is a quality player and a fighter and I know he will bounce back.”Frans Steyn, who has been struggling with an ankle injury, has been bracketed with Taute in the midfield. Should Steyn not pass a fitness test by Friday, Taute will start and Juan de Jongh will come in on the bench.South Africa v AustraliaSaturday, 29th September 2012 at Loftus Versfeld, PretoriaKick-off: 16:00 BST live on Sky Sports 2 DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 15: Johan Goosen of South Africa in action during the Rugby Championship match between the New Zealand All Blacks and South Africa at Forsyth Barr Stadium on September 15, 2012 in Dunedin, New Zealand. (Photo by Sandra Mu/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Heineken Cup preview: the semi-finals

first_imgSaturday 27th April 2013Clermont Auvergne v Munster, 5:00pm, Sky Sports 1Sunday 28th April 2013 Champions elect?: Clermont have not lost in the Heineken Cup this season and are heavily backed to be Euromasters By Alan DymockTHE CRASS amongst us would suggest that it is easy to place French powerhouse Clermont Auvergne straight into the final of the Heineken Cup. They are strong, they are slick, they are free scoring in attack and stingy in defence. They should beat Munster.This does a disservice to the famous Irish province, though. Yes, the other semi-final on Sunday between Saracens and Toulon is more touch and go, with arguably no clear favourite. Nevertheless, the game between Munster and Clermont is one between glorious old-stagers and a star-studded side who want to reach that big stage more than any teenager on YouTube. There will be points of great tension.Happy in his work: Paul O’ConnellDavit Zirakashvili at tight-head facing Dave Kilcoyne on the loose-head is an unpredictable duel which may spill over, washing other players out towards disruption. Not because either player is particularly dirty, but because their styles do not easily mesh. Peter O’Mahony facing down Julien Bonnaire is also a complex tussle, and we know what we get with Paul O’Connell versus Nathan Hines. There will be a few one-handed takes or pops here and there, sure, but after 80 minutes there may only be gristle and studs left.That first semi-final is about the proud but battered Munster bracing and letting the waves of Clermont crash upon them. Had this been in the group stages you may have said that this was a gimme for Les Jaunards because of their scintillating backs like Wesley Fofana and Napolioni Nalaga and their grizzly forwards. In the Heineken Cup, however, Munster are not so easily cowed.In the other match, with the playboys from the south of France packed off to Twickenham to face Saracens, anything could happen.Some of the match-ups are not as expected. Toulon’s Steffon Armitage is benched behind Juan-Martin Fernandez-Lobbe, with Danie Rossouw playing blindside. Sarries have Kelly Brown at openside and Jackson Wray facing off against the hulking South African. In the pre-match build-up there have been idle exchanges about the weight of packs and the disappointment Saracens have previously had in this competition. This is all a distractionary blurb. What it boils down to is if Saracens can control their own set-piece in the face of the loose but innovative Toulon forwards. The French side has impressive scrummagers in Carl Hayman and Andrew Sheridan and Saracens have cohesion, with Matt Stevens their driving their point. Saracens also have a lineout that will be drilled more than the North Sea. Toulon have a number of players that can be thrown up and thuggishly take the ball.Leader of the pack: Steve Borthwick is consistency personifiedIn each pirouette of play there will be match-ups that are hard to call. No readymade clichés can be brought out here because Toulon are mercenaries brought together by the love of performance and the riches only borne out of success. They are very large, but they are also a band of mavericks able to spin and link and grift their opponents. Saracens are bullies who may have to learn a new way, relying on synergy and some very, very sharp rugby brains within their ranks.With this second game you shouldn’t waste your time flipping a coin, because any penny up for grabs is at risk of being snaffled by a Toulon player. And with a coin flip there are pre-set rules; there are only two outcomes.This weekend of Heineken rugby is attractive purely because it may become shapeless and unconventional. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img GLOUCESTER, ENGLAND – APRIL 20: Steve Borthwick of Saracens during the Aviva Premiership match between Gloucester and Saracens at Kingsholm Stadium on April 20, 2013 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by Tony Marshall/Getty Images) Saracens v Toulon, 3:00pm, Sky Sports 2last_img read more

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Stade Francais players found to have “lung lesions” due to Covid-19

first_imgThe discovery means their friendly with Toulon has been scrapped Hit hard: The club’s Top 14 preparations have been rocked (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Stade Francais players found to have “lung lesions” due to Covid-19French giants Stade Français have had to cancel their pre-season match against Toulon after it was found that an undisclosed number of players who had tested positive for Covid-19 were now showing “lung lesions due to the virus.”A few weeks back the Top 14 club had confirmed that a number of players had contracted the virus. At the time the squad were forced to leave their training camp, with the whole outfit sent into two weeks of quarantine. This latest news means that it was impossible to play their upcoming friendly on 27 August.Stade are scheduled to host the first match of the new Top 14 season, with Bordeaux lined up to play in Paris on Friday 4 September.Related: Top 14 2020-21 Season PreviewIn an official communication, the club said today:“In light of the compulsory medical examinations for all players who have been diagnosed positive with the RT-PCR test for Covid-19, it appears that some of them are carriers of lung lesions due to the virus.center_img “These lesions require a period of complete rest currently estimated to be a minimum of one week and which will be added to the fortnight already observed.“Other reviews are currently underway.”Related: The wild life of the Bouclier de Brennus Top 14 trophyThe statement went on to add: “For obvious health reasons, (this has led to) the cancellation of the friendly match against RC Toulon scheduled for August 27.“Once again, the club would like to thank all those who have shown their support during recent days.” Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Executive Council looks to future near end of triennium

first_img April 20, 2012 at 4:49 pm I’m sure that some heart felt repentance and a return to the Lordship of Christ and the authority of the Bible would go far to “save” TEC from its declining membership and insecure future. Then they could rest of Scripture’s promise that not even the “gates of Hell” would prevail against them. But as it stands now, they are supporting the wrong side of that Scriptural promise. After 35 years as an Episcopalian, they certainly have broken their vow to me and my heart in the process. I can only wonder how Our Lord feels. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Tlhe Rev. Robert A. Terrill says: Executive Council, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Executive Council looks to future near end of triennium Changes in the church get members’ attention Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH April 18, 2012 at 5:48 pm Corrections would not be a revision – the budget would remain the same it would just be a document Deputies could deal with as they go to GC. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rich McDonough says: Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (5) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls The Rev. Ann Fontaine says: Comments are closed. Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City, Utah]  The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council began its last meeting of the 2010-2012 triennium contemplating its leadership role — and emotional investment — in the church’s journey to its future.The council has spent much of the last three years exploring how the Episcopal Church must change in response to the challenges facing all mainline churches, including declining memberships and thus declining finances, demographic shifts and cultural changes in the place and authority accorded to religious communities in society. When General Convention convenes in July in Indianapolis, deputies and bishops will grapple with a variety of calls (some of the proposals can be seen here) for changes in the church’s structure that their proposers say will help the church meet those challenges.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson and Bishop Stacy Sauls, Episcopal Church chief operating officer, all addressed the impact and implications of those challenges during their opening remarks April 18.Jefferts Schori reminded council members that they began the current triennium “just past a major budget cut [made by the previous meeting of Convention] that forced a public and painful reduction in church center staff.”She said that the cut was prompted by the economic crisis that “only hurried a reality that has been emerging for some time,” adding that the Episcopal Church, like other denominations, “is declining in numbers, financial strength, and societal influence.”Such decline causes grief, she said, “as former ways of living, governing, and privilege disappear.” Grief “can elicit anger, denial, and attempts to go back to some remembered golden age,” but none of those responses heals the grief nor does “tinkering with details.”Tension within the council during the last three years is what the presiding bishop called “a symptom of collective grief,” for which she hoped the members will find healing during the meeting that they can carry to the wider church. “Your willingness to endure these difficulties has been sacrificial, both as a faithful act of holiness, and as a sacramental act on behalf of others,” she told the council.Jefferts Schori said the Spirit is calling the council and the church to “let go of what is dead and embrace the new life that’s emerging.”“We’re looking toward a church that is more varied and less rigidly controlled, more networked and less directed,” the presiding bishop suggested. “This new church is going to be more organic, more profoundly a body with uniquely gifted parts, each one honored and blessed for the service of God’s mission.”Jefferts Schori said no one, including her, “knows exactly what this church is going to look like — and that scares some folks to death.”“We do know that perfect love casts out fear, and when we can remember how deeply and completely love dwells within us, the fear does begin to recede,” she said.Anderson told the council that her prayer is that “in the end, the process of restructuring the Episcopal Church will allow us to listen more closely to people who do not carry important titles or sit in the councils of the church, but who know a great deal — perhaps more than we do — about how to create the next kind of church that God is calling into being.”The House of Deputies president added that she wants the church to approach change in a way “that will keep us from the unintended consequences that come from reactive decision-making. I want us to keep the decision-making in the hands of all the baptized and not an elite few.”The church needs a conceptual framework for meeting the adaptive challenges it faces and accomplishing the technical fixes it needs, she said, explaining that adaptive challenges, such as declining membership and thus declining revenue, must not be addressed hastily. Anderson suggested that the church approach General Convention with a focus on what it can accomplish as a legislative body to implement technical fixes that “will give us room to think, to talk, to come up with ways to transform the ‘organization’ of the church into a ‘movement’ that embraces the faith, wisdom and voices of all the baptized.”The 77th meeting of convention could consider such fixes as changing the way dioceses may merge, reducing the number of standing committees to use limited-term working groups and reconsidering how the church’s endowment funds are used now and in the future, she said.However, she warned that approaching restructuring as a way to be efficient “run[s] a grave risk of diminishing the voices of laypeople and clergy” and if restructuring is about simply saving money then “mission priorities take a back seat to number crunching.”And, Anderson said, “if we approach restructuring believing in the false choice between governance and mission, we risk losing our central identity as a people whose democratic decision-making has led us time and time again to take prophetic action on issues of justice and peace and build strong mission relationships with one another and across the Anglican Communion.”Sauls described for council what he said is the paradox faced by all vestries, councils, and boards: They “have a fiduciary duty to use financial assets so that the institution survives, but survival is not a value of the Gospel this institution exists to serve.”He noted that Jesus told his disciples that those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for his sake will save it.“We need to have a conversation about, given the inherent paradox of trying to lead a Christian community, what are the structures that will help us and how are our resources most faithfully deployed,” Sauls said.“The conversation I long to have with you as the elected leadership of the Episcopal Church is not about the panic of our declining numbers but about how we strengthen what is working best out there and make what is strong stronger so that the strong can serve the less than strong,” he said.That conversation would also put “everything on the table about our common life” and look at it in light of what Jesus said about survival and what the church believes about resurrection, Sauls said.Saying that putting everything on the table would help rebuild the church “for a new time that has no precise historical precedent,” Sauls suggested that the conversation include dioceses and “how the ministry of a bishop relates to a particular people rather than to a particular geography,” and “how bishops should work with each other collegially and how often they should meet together.” The agenda could also include the role of the presiding bishop as primate of the church, “how other clergy and laypeople participate in the councils of the church [and how they] are encouraged to live out their baptisms by proclaiming the good news of what God has done in Christ by word and example” and “how we use the resource of a church-wide staff to serve local mission and ministry.”A number of council members responded to the three’s opening remarks. Saying that “it’s not a question of whether we’re going to change, it’s a question of how,” Dylan Breuer of the Diocese of Massachusetts warned her colleagues about “false dichotomies.”“The choices that are before us … are not binary choices,” she said. “They require creativity, they require 360 degree thinking. We could go in any number of ways.” She added that setting up either-or thinking “sometimes can imply that those who disagree with us are less spiritually sound.”Katie Sherrod of the Diocese of Fort Worth praised the idea that people outside of the traditional governance structures of the church would be called by council to “come be the leaders of this church.”She told Jefferts Schori, Anderson and Sauls that “all three of you have called us into a wonderful new way of thinking, but we have to make that compact among ourselves that we will assume good intentions on the part everyone and we will not bad-mouth someone even in private because that taints our thinking.”Some of the tensions the council has faced surfaced during an evaluation of the 2012-2015 draft budget process council completed at its January meeting.Ohio Bishop Mark Hollingsworth questioned why council could not correct the “mistakes and errors” in the version of the draft budget council forwarded to the church’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) in January. He asked whether council could send that group a revised version.Jefferts Schori and the Rev. Canon Gregory Straub, executive officer and secretary of the General Convention, said canons prevent the council from revising the budgetThe Rev. Winnie Varghese of the Diocese of New York said she would, for the second time in a row, speak against the budget at convention because twice now “the final document does not reflect what the body asked for or decided [and] I find that an incredibly difficult position to be in.”The Rev. Gay Jennings of the Diocese of Ohio said that “we did send a budget that had mistakes in it, so to me it’s a matter of the integrity of Executive Council” because the budget sent to PB&F “was not what some of us believed was adopted.”Jefferts Schori said that PB&F “is fully aware of what the issues are and I think there’s a piece of this that is our ability to let it go.” She later agreed with Bruce Garner of the Diocese of Atlanta that a “memo of information” from council to PB&F “would be entirely appropriate.”PB&F Chair Diane Pollard (Diocese of New York) and Vice Chair Steve Lane, bishop of Maine, recently posted a letter on various websites, including here, noting “some internal inconsistencies and at least one error in the draft proposed budget.” They said that the budget cannot be changed until General Convention.Jefferts Schori concluded the evaluation discussion by saying this part of the budget process was not perfect but it was “a sign and a symbol of the transition we’re engaged in” and she suggested that the “push-back and anger is a reflection of what’s going on in the larger system,” especially because some people did not get what they wanted or they cannot see whether or not what they wanted is in the budget document.“We’re in a significant transition and you are receiving some of the cost of leadership and it’s OK,” she said. “God will work something out of this that’s new and different.”Council members then spent 90 minutes participating in an anti-racism exercise. Several members later told ENS that the exercise’s presentations and subsequent discussions helped move the group towards the healing that Jefferts Schori called for earlier in the morning.Executive Council is meeting for three days in Salt Lake City. Members spent the remainder of April 18 meeting in committees and will continue to do so the morning of April 19. The members will reconvene in plenary session that afternoon. Council will spend the entire day April 20 in plenary considering reports and resolutions.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by provincial synods for six-year terms, plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET April 19, 2012 at 8:54 am If EC sends a “memo of information” re the Budget, it should go to all Deputies and Bishops, not just PB&F. The most helpful form of such a memo, as suggested by Liz Zivanov on HOBD, would be an actual budget spreadsheet showing the corrected draft budget as intended by EC, but titled in such a way as to avoid the canonical issues mentioned by Diane Pollard, +Stephen Lane, the PB and Canon Straub. If, as I believe is the case, PB&F has already begun its work, I also don’t see why PB&F could not release an updated “working draft” of the budget at or shortly before the opening of Convention. I’m sure we have enough smart canon lawyers among us who could frame this in a way that complies with canonical requirements. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 18, 2012 Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Carol Rollo says: Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA April 20, 2012 at 1:53 pm I could not agree more. Many of our dioceses were established when travel was difficult and there was a need to have a Bishop closer to a specific geographic area, ie Lexington being split from Kentucky. There needs to be some logic when defining what a diocese is, in today’s world. Should there be a minimum number of members in a diocese? Can dioceses be merged within a state? Where I live, 4 churches are closer to the Diocese of Southern Ohio, and may have more in common with, than Lexington. Could they be better served from Cincinnati than Lexington (not a suggestion, just a question)? Executive Council April 2012 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI April 18, 2012 at 6:10 pm Most if not all of the resolutions on church structure speak to restructuring at the national level. This does not go far enough. We have too many dioceses and bishops. Fulltime clergy are losing their jobs, our membership is down, yet we are moribund when it comes to diocesan consolidation with fewer bishops. How much better we would be in engaging the Great Commission with less overhead at the judicatory level. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Jack Zamboni says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

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World Refugee Day a chance to highlight church’s resettlement work

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Rector Bath, NC Refugees Migration & Resettlement, Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service By Lucy ChumbleyPosted Jun 20, 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC World Refugee Day Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL World Refugee Day a chance to highlight church’s resettlement work Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Episcopal News Service] On the eve of today’s observance of World Refugee Day, about 150 people gathered in a U.S. House of Representatives conference room to honor the legacy of Rep. Donald Payne (D-NJ) for working to bring attention to the plight of displaced people and refugees, and to celebrate those who continue such advocacy.Five members of Congress spoke at the event, of which Episcopal Migration Ministries was a sponsor, and former New Jersey Assemblyman William D. Payne offered an emotional tribute to his brother, who died March 6.But perhaps the most moving testimony came from a man who never met Donald Payne, yet whose life was profoundly affected by him: Darfuri human rights activist Abdalmageed Haroun.Haroun described how, while in prison in 2009 for his involvement in human rights work in Sudan, the guard who usually came to torture him arrived in the middle of the night with a letter in his hands and asked, “Who is Donald Payne?”That letter set off a chain of events that eventually led to Haroun’s arrival in the United States as a refugee and inspired his continuing advocacy work on behalf of Darfur with the Human Rights and Advocacy Network for Democracy (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Human-Rights-and-Advocacy-Network-for-Democracy-HAND/252134208162891).“I went to his funeral in March,” Haroun said. “I didn’t meet him, but I still keep his letters with me. There’s a lot of people … they don’t know you, but they’ll help you.”It’s work the Episcopal Church has engaged in for years, from resettlement efforts across the country overseen by EMM and its partners and affiliates to the advocacy work of the church’s Office of Government Relations in Washington, D.C.Resettlement effortsEpiscopal Migration Ministries, based at the Episcopal Church’s New York offices, is one of nine national agencies working in partnership with the U.S. State Department’s Refugee Resettlement Program.Supported by the Episcopal Church and a range of government grants, EMM – which will celebrate its 25th anniversary in 2013 – works with 31 affiliate offices in 22 states and 28 Episcopal dioceses. Its primary function is to provide support and assistance to help new arrivals find their footing during their first, critical days in the United States.“We have a very diverse and broad-ranging network, geographically widely diffused,” said Daniel Trudeau, a program manager for EMM. “We assist thousands of refugees annually, working together with faith groups and volunteers to help these newcomers find work and adjust to life in their community.”The U.S. State Department defines refugees as those who have fled their home country and cannot return because of a well-founded fear of persecution based on religion, race, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group.According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, there are approximately 10.5 million refugees in the world today. Of these, most will remain in the country where they sought refuge until they can return home safely. A small number will be granted citizenship in the country to which they fled, and less than 1 percent – those at the highest risk – will be resettled in a third country.Since 1975, the State Department reports, the United States has welcomed close to 3 million refugees from around the world. This accounts for more than half of all third-party resettlements.In 2011, EMM and its affiliates assisted more than 3,600 refugees from 34 countries by providing hospitality, housing and help with finding everything from medical care to language classes and employment during their first 90 to 180 days in the country.EMM’s work begins, Trudeau said, when it receives word from the State Department that refugees who have requested asylum have been evaluated, screened and declared ready for travel, and confirms an office is ready to accept them.“Each agency has a different profile and a different ability to receive and resettle,” he said. “Some are able to deal with multiple groups, while others focus on helping refugees from a particular place.”Placement decisions are made through a collaborative process with the State Department and are based on factors such as family reunification, employment opportunities and the availability of social services, Trudeau said. Once they are on U.S. soil, refugees are free to go where they choose, he added. “It’s a very complicated process.”Along with adjusting to differences in language, culture and cuisine, many refugees also are dealing with the absence of family members and sometimes psychological trauma.“In the first days after their arrival, people are at their most vulnerable and in need of support,” Trudeau said.Arriving in AmericaRefugee populations served by EMM include Eritreans, Somalis, Congolese, Cubans and Colombians, Trudeau said. But the largest number currently come from Burma, an ethnically diverse country where numerous groups are being persecuted by the government; from Bhutan, where ethnic Nepalese were forced out 20 years ago and have yet to see their situation resolved; and from Iraq.New arrivals are met at the airport by a case worker, taken to an apartment equipped for their arrival and given a culturally appropriate meal, said Molly Short, executive director of Journey’s End Refugee Services, an EMM affiliate partner in Buffalo, New York.Often they arrive after midnight following a grueling journey, so refugees are left to sleep after a brief safety orientation (what to do in case of emergency). A case worker visits within 24 hours – typically to take the refugee family to the bank and the grocery store. In the days following, they are walked through a series of appointments, such as registration for Social Security, social services and school enrollment.“It can be overwhelming,” Short said. “There’s a lot of information, and it’s so different.”Each case is different, too, she stressed. “Every population is different. But, more importantly, every individual is different, and that’s why we focus on giving them individualized care. In the same day, we could welcome in a farmer and a scientist from the same ethnic background.”It typically takes families about five years to adjust fully to their new life, Short said.Sometimes – as in the case of one Somali woman – a refugee’s previous life leaves a long shadow.A year after arriving and getting settled, Short said, this woman came into the Journey’s End office to fill out her U.S. Immigration Green Card application and broke down in tears. For the first time, she described how, when soldiers invaded, she gave her baby to her two older sons and told them to run. She was raped and tortured, fled and became pregnant in the refugee camp. Eventually, the pain of being separated from her children and not knowing where they were had become unbearable.“She went through what for a woman is the worst form of torture,” Short said.Following her painful revelation, Journey’s End helped her find mental health services. Eventually, it located her sons.“They aren’t here yet, but they’ll come,” Short said. “She talks to them on the phone, has photographs.”A new life emerges in layers. “It doesn’t happen right away,” Short said. “It takes time for people to tell their story. But when they’re ready, they do it.”Advocacy workFor Katie Conway, immigration and refugee policy analyst for the Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, World Refugee Day is a chance to reflect on the end result of the Episcopal Church’s advocacy work – resettling refugees.“I think it is an opportunity for education, but also for celebrating,” she said of the day the United Nations established in 2000 to honor the courage, strength and determination of those forced to flee their homes. “It’s about celebrating the successes, because that’s really what the program is about at its end.”Conway’s advocacy work is rooted in Executive Council and General Convention resolutions relating to refugees and immigrants.“I am not involved at all in suggesting resolutions,” she said, adding that she is keeping track of proposed legislation for the 77th General Convention, set for July 5-12 in Indianapolis. “It’s my job to represent the church and provide expert opinion, but it’s up to the people in the church to decide what they want their priorities to be.”The 20 or so resolutions that currently inform her work run the gamut from very specific regional requests to broad-based ones, such as advocating for a just system of asylum.Conway’s work takes many forms. She serves on an advocacy committee for the Refugee Council USA, a coalition of organizations committed to welcoming and protecting refugees that works to shape legislation. She attends hearings for relevant bills or watches them on CSPAN, occasionally submitting a statement from the Episcopal Church into the record. She keeps an eye on appropriations markups (the process by which congressional committees and subcommittees debate, amend and rewrite proposed legislation). She sometimes puts out an alert via the Episcopal Public Policy Network and also produces a monthly newsletter on immigration and refugee issues, which includes legislative updates, news articles and resources.Deborah Stein, director of EMM, chairs RCUSA’s Resettlement Committee, and Conway said she works closely with EMM to have a unified message and goal.“They’re the people implementing the refugee resettlements, so I like to talk to them as often as I can,” she said. “Also, if I hear of anything I like to keep them informed.”She currently is tracking bills in New Hampshire and Tennessee that aim to reduce the numbers of refugees resettled in those locations. “The conversation on immigration has gotten so ugly, it’s extending to refugees as well,” she said.At the Refugee Council, Conway said, a chief concern is clearing security-check backlogs, which are causing a bottleneck in the refugee-resettlement process, particularly for Iraqis. Because of these delays, the numbers of refugees entering the United States, set each year by the administration in consultation with Congress, has dropped in the last few years and now hovers at around 80,000.How to helpParishes and individuals, Trudeau said, are encouraged to co-sponsor refugees through EMM’s affiliate offices, increasing the program’s capacity and success through financial or volunteer assistance.“There’s a lot of really inspiring things that take place when a congregation gets together and commits themselves to a family,” he said. “And there’s a lot of different ways of doing it. We’ve seen a lot of different models.”Not used widely outside the Episcopal Church, the co-sponsorship model distinguishes the program as it offers refugees a greater level of support and connection, he said. “It’s the difference between having a great start and taking time to get your bearings and struggling a little more.”He’d like to see every refugee family and individual have a co-sponsor, he said. “Co-sponsorship is great for refugees and for the church as well.”“I think it provides a common sense of purpose, and it can really bring people together, and that can really be a very tangible and direct way of feeling like they’re contributing to God’s community.”EMM’s 31 affiliate offices are all within the bounds of Episcopal dioceses, Trudeau said. “What we really want most is to connect those dioceses and churches with our offices. We want the church to be as involved as possible, on the local level and elsewhere.”•    To learn more about co-sponsoring a refugee, visit here.•    One of these short videos filmed at EMM affiliates around the country can be used as the topic of a Sunday forum: https://vimeo.com/emmrefugee/videos•    To receive updates on refugees, immigration and other areas in which the church has an interest, join the Episcopal Public Policy Network here.•    Bulletin inserts, updates and other educational materials pertaining to refugees and immigrants can be found here.— Lucy Chumbley is a freelance journalist based in Washington, D.C. Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

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San Joaquín acoge su próximo capítulo con el ‘obispo misionero’…

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Por Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 27, 2014 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Obispo David Rice da la Sagrada Eucaristía a uno de los miembros más jóvenes de la Diócesis de San Joaquín. Foto: Richard Schori[Episcopal News Service] La Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori, más de media docena de otros obispos y unos 400 episcopales dieron, el 23 de febrero, al recién nombrado obispo auxiliar David Rice una alegre, entusiasta bienvenida oficial a la Diócesis de San Joaquín.Rodeado por un desbordante público en el servicio de la tarde festivo en la iglesia San Pablo [St. Paul’s Church] en Modesto, la obispa presidente dirigió la juramentación de conformidad a la doctrina, disciplina y culto de la iglesia episcopal a Rice, quien recientemente se desempeñó como obispo de Waiapu  en la iglesia anglicana en Aotearoa, Nueva Zelanda y Polinesia.Rice está a punto de convertirse en el próximo obispo provisional de la diócesis; él va a presentarse a las elecciones en la convención especial del próximo 29 de marzo que se celebrará a las 11:00 am en la iglesia de San Pablo [St. Paul’s Church]en Bakersfield.El obispo David Rice y su esposa Tracy acompañados en frente del altar por los obispos de las diócesis Provincia VIII de la iglesia episcopal. Foto: Kelvin YeeAcompañado de algunos de los obispos de la Provincia VIII de la iglesia episcopal  – Marc Andrus (California); Barry Beisner (Carolina del Norte); Mary Gray-Reeves (El Camino Real); Jim Mathes (San Diego); y Edna Bavi “Nedi” Rivera (provisional, Este de Oregon) – Jefferts Schori rindió homenaje al obispo provisional anterior Jerry Lamb (jubilado, California del Norte) y Chet Talton (sufragánea retirado, Los Ángeles), quienes también estuvieron presentes en el servicio.“El obispo Lamb era un partidario fiel, leal y creativo al fomentar esta diócesis para descubrir la realidad de que… todos los bautizados están dotados para el ministerio, y esos dones y habilidades difieren de una persona a otra, y todos ellos son esenciales para el trabajo del cuerpo de Cristo, “ella dijo con respecto a ese capítulo en la vida de la diócesis. “Tal vez la consigna central de este capítulo fue” crecer… a la plena estatura de Cristo’”.Añadió que el libro de Jane Onstad Lamb [“Hurt, Joy and the Grace of God”] “Dolor, Alegría y la Gracia de Dios” (applecart Books, 2012) ayudó al mundo a aprender acerca de “el duro trabajo de decir la verdad… y que ha sido un regalo para otros en circunstancias similares”.Los tres obispos sucesivos provisionales de San Joaquín (desde la izquierda) Jerry Lamb, David Rice y Chet Talton fuera de San Pablo, [St. Paul’s], Modesto. Foto: Kelvin YeeTalton presidió a Lamb como obispo provisional y su mandato era respecto a “reconstruir, volver a conectarse, sobre la sanación… y animar para ser presencia invitadora y acogedora en la comunidad en general. “Chet y Abril [cónyuge] han empujado continuamente, atraído, y engatusado a la gente de por aquí para probar cosas nuevas, y alcanzarlas en maneras que pueden parecer atemorizantes o nuevas, siempre dirigidas al bien del otro”, dijo la obispa presidente.Este próximo capítulo con Rice “puede ser resumido, ‘mire aquí y vea cómo es Dios, y si no se puede ver claramente, mire lo que hago, y verá lo que Dios está haciendo’. Esta comunidad diocesana se dedica a hacer que esas palabras y obras sean evidentes – para que el mundo pueda ver la sanación, la reconciliación y la buena noticia en la carne “, dijo.Ella también desafió a los episcopales de San Joaquín a – en palabras del antiguo obispo de Nueva York Paul Moore “‘¡levantarse, salir y perderse!” Levanta tu coraje, sal al mundo, y perdeos en servir el mundo de Dios”.Temprano en el día, Rice había compartido un sentimiento similar mientras predicaba en la iglesia San Juan el Bautista [St. John the Baptist Church] en Lodi, a unas 40 millas al norte de Modesto.Describiéndose a sí mismo como un “obispo misionero”, él dijo: “¿Qué es lo que yo perpetuamente hablaría y preguntaría con respecto a esto?, ¿cómo estás involucrado en el mundo más allá de esta hermosa casa de oración?”. Él desafío a la congregación a pensar sobre lo que significa “volver a definirnos para nuestras vidas para lo que significa un vencindario, y la realidad es que si tomamos en serio el evangelio, si tomamos la vida de Cristo en serio, [un vecindario] es mucho más amplio y mucho más incluyente de lo que quizás queremos admitir a veces en nuestras vidas”.Temas fundamentales de su ministerio, basadas en el pueblo indígena de la gente Maori  de los conceptos de Nueva Zelanda de “manakitanga” (como es recibido) y whakapapa (de dónde viene), incluyen extender la hospitalidad no sólo a los que nos visitan la iglesia, pero además amplia el concepto de la iglesia, dijo. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN “Eso se llama-eclesio-céntrico, cuando todo se centra en este lugar, al igual de lo que sucede aquí [en el interior del edificio de la iglesia]”, dijo Rice. “Estoy diciendo amplíe su horizonte de que la iglesia es esto y mucho más.“Si verdaderamente creemos en la vida de Cristo y en el mensaje de nuestro Señor y las formas en que modela al vivir por ahí, entonces a veces podemos estar un poco incómodos. A veces puede ser que tengamos que cambiar. A veces, el patrón de nuestras vidas podría ser alterado. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI “Desde mi perspectiva, la iglesia es todo por lo que podemos ver”, dijo Rice. “Es donde está Dios. El mandato del Evangelio nos invita a unirnos con Dios donde quiera que Dios se encuentre y Dios está en todas partes al mismo tiempo en el sentido más ubicuo”.Lo que significa que “nos permitimos ver y experimentar a Cristo vivo en todo el mundo que nos encontramos”, agregó. “Piense en cómo el mundo en que vivimos podría ser dramáticamente, y profundamente diferente si dejamos verdaderamente ver al Cristo vivo en todo el mundo”.Recordó ser testigo de miles de jóvenes que jugaban tenis [netball] una mañana de un domingo cuando se dirigía a celebrar la Eucaristía en una iglesia en la diócesis Waiapu, un acontecimiento semanal, de acuerdo con miembros de la iglesia. Rice les preguntó: “¿Qué pasa si algún domingo en vez de reunirse aquí, nos reunimos allí, y usamos nuestras camisetas y ofrecemos agua embotellada a la gente y que poder estar ahí y hacerles saber lo que somos y así podríamos ampliar nuestro barrio”. Varias personas se sentían incómodas con la idea, dijo, diciendo que preferían estar en el edificio de la iglesia el domingo por la mañana. Otros preguntaron si ofrecer agua a los jugadores de tenis atraería a más gente a la iglesia. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA San Joaquín acoge su próximo capítulo con el ‘obispo misionero’ David Rice Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME “Si hacemos lo que hizo Cristo. Si hacemos lo que él nos invitó a hacer, ¿sabes lo que pasa? Construimos relaciones, respondemos a las necesidades, vamos una milla extra… y aquellos a quienes respondemos quieren ser parte de la comunidad y, a veces – no siempre – ellos van a venir”.Sin embargo, “esto no es la evangelización”, agregó. “Esto es algo diferente. Esta es la misión. Esto es ser misionero”.En una nota personal, Rice evocó risas y aplausos cuando dijo a los feligreses que él había asistido a un bar nocturno para recaudar fondos en la iglesia Santa Ana [St. Anne’s Church] en Stockton la noche anterior y que su antigua diócesis compartió una tradición con la diócesis de Central California Valley – ambas están situados en las zonas de mayor producción de vino.Nacido y criado en Carolina del Norte, dijo que sus padres tienen ascendencia cherokee, y cree que él puede llevar el registro para la mayoría de las ordenaciones – cinco, incluyendo ordenaciones para diácono y ministro de la iglesia Metodista Unida, después como diácono y sacerdote y luego como obispo en la iglesia anglicana.También fue ministro de la juventud y ha añadido que está “muy interesado ​​en participar en las vidas de los jóvenes de aquí en todo lo que pueda”.Patsy Lithco, 67, un feligrés de la parroquia de San Juan [St. John] dijo que “se enamoró” de Rice inmediatamente. “Me gustó mucho su mensaje acerca de lo que tenemos que hacer fuera de estas paredes. Él me sacó mis calcetines. Él es absolutamente un guardián”.Rice inspiro esperanza en Jim Reeve, miembro de San Juan [St. John] por nueve años. “Era un esperanzado profético. Ese fue probablemente uno de los mejores mensajes que he escuchado, sobre todo la parte de salir fuera de la iglesia. Él hizo una súplica apasionada a nosotros hacer lo que el Señor nos ha pedido hacer”.La Rda. Elaine Breckenridge, sacerdote encargada de San Juan, [St. John]  estuvo de acuerdo en que Rice inspiró esperanza. “Estoy muy emocionada. Fue un sermón tan inspirador. Él es carismático y un pensador profundo al mismo tiempo. Él traerá un nivel de esperanza a la diócesis”.Después de una larga conversación tranquila con Rice, William Bunn, 9, lo pronuncia “agradable. Él es un buen amigo. Llamó a mi camiseta chaleco y dijo que era apuesto”.EL obispo provisional Chet Talton nombró a Rice obispo auxiliar. Rice comenzará a hacer visitas pastorales en esa capacidad. Si es elegido el 29 de marzo Rice ocupará inmediatamente el puesto de obispo provisional de la diócesis, convirtiéndose en el primer obispo activo para servir en esa capacidad después de que las diferencias teológicas dividieron la diócesis en el 2007.–LA Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Ella radica en Los Ángeles. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

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Archbishop of Canterbury’s 2017 New Year message

first_imgArchbishop of Canterbury’s 2017 New Year message Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA January 3, 2017 at 5:14 pm The Archbishop’s message is about real mission.That is where we need to focus not on whether gay people can marry each other. Lets get on with helping people-and not penalizing those who are in a love relationship. We need to see more love in this very fractured society. Let’s really do unto others as …….. and love one another —what ever our race, sexual orientation, religion, etc. Rector Bath, NC Anglican Communion, Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Barbara Reynolds says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. Posted Jan 1, 2017 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Archbishop of Canterbury AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Read the transcript of the Archbishop’s message:Recently I stood in the ruins of Coventry Cathedral, which was bombed on 14th November, 1940. On the remains of the wall behind the altar are written the words, ‘Father Forgive’ – echoing the words that Jesus prayed as his enemies crucified him. The day after the bombing, the Provost of the Cathedral, an extraordinary man called Dick Howard, made a commitment not to revenge but to seek forgiveness and reconciliation.On Christmas Day that year, Provost Howard preached a sermon that was broadcast across the Empire on the BBC. In it, he called for a new and more Christ-like world after the war.I started life as a clergyman here in Coventry. I was ordained in the new Cathedral, which was built alongside the ruins. I never imagined I’d work here, but for five years I helped lead Coventry’s global ministry of reconciliation, which grew out of Dick Howard’s vision and now has 200 partners for peace around the world.Coventry’s always been a place that has caught my imagination and my passion. The story of this city says so much that is true about Britain at its best. About our courage, our standing up to tyranny, how we stand alongside the suffering and defeated. How we stand for human dignity and hope.It says something vitally important about our generosity. How we’ve embraced the idea of reconciliation, so that our wartime enemies are now friends. Thanks to our creative, innovative spirit, this vibrant and diverse city is also a hugely welcoming place.I met Sabir Zazai many years ago and I was delighted to have an opportunity to visit the centre for refugees he now runs. He came as a refugee from Afghanistan in 1999, and his sheer courage and ability are extraordinary. He’s now a key figure in the future of this city.There are people like Sabir all over the country, and they are a blessing to our way of life. They are embracing all that is good. And that doesn’t just enrich their lives, it enriches and deepens ours too.Last year we made a decision that will profoundly affect the future of our country – a decision made democratically by the people. The EU referendum was a tough campaign and it has left divisions. But I know that if we look at our roots, our culture and our history in the Christian tradition, if we reach back into what is best in this country, we will find a path towards reconciling the differences that have divided us.If we’re welcoming to those in need, if we’re generous in giving, if we take hold of our new future with determination and courage, then we will flourish. Living well together despite our differences, offering hospitality to the stranger and those in exile, with unshakable hope for the future – these are the gifts, the commands and the promises of Jesus Christ.They are also the foundations of our best shared values, traditions and practices in Britain. They make us the country we can be – a gift and source of confidence to this troubled world, in which we live not only for ourselves but as a beacon of hope, a city set on a hill.I wish you a happy and hope-filled New Year. Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (1) Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

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El Obispo Primado encabeza peregrinaje de reconciliación a Ghana

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Ghana Pilgrimage, Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 El Obispo Primado encabeza peregrinaje de reconciliación a Ghana Siga el viaje en Facebook Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Por Lynette WilsonPosted Jan 19, 2017 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Africa, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Rector Belleville, IL El patio frente al océano del castillo de esclavos de Cabo Corso. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.[Episcopal News Service] El obispo primado Michael Curry encabezará una peregrinación de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo (ERD, por su sigla en inglés) a Ghana. La visita de una semana, del 20 al 28 de enero, centrada en la reconciliación, incluirá ciudades y sitios de importancia para entender la trata trasatlántica de esclavos, así como el encuentro con asociados de la ERD y programas dedicados a mejorar la vida de los ghaneses.“En la Convención General de 2015, prometimos abordar el racismo sistémico y estructural como Iglesia. Uno de los primeros pasos es aprender las historias: cómo nuestra Iglesia apoyó la esclavitud y prosperó gracias a la esclavitud y la opresión, cómo los negros se relacionaban entre sí, cómo las comunidades ghaneses aportan grandes dones y sabiduría al mundo de hoy. Con todo eso tiene que ver la peregrinación”, dijo la Rda. Stephanie Spellers, canóniga del Obispo Primado para la evangelización, la reconciliación y la creación.Se calcula que de 12 a 25 millones de africanos pasaron por los puertos de Ghana para ser vendidos como esclavos en Estados Unidos, América Latina y el Caribe. Los peregrinos visitarán el castillo de Cabo Corso, el Centro W.E.B. DuBois, el castillo de Elmina y el campamento de esclavos de Pikworo, para tener una perspectiva histórica de la trata de esclavos. También tendrán la oportunidad de reunirse con los asociados de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, entre ellos la organización Anglicana Diocesana de Desarrollo y Ayuda en la Diócesis Anglicana de Tamale, presenciar su labor de desarrollo de la comunidad basado en recursos.“La Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo se siente honrada de que el Obispo Primado dirija esta peregrinación de hermanos y hermanas obispos junto con miembros actuales y ex miembros de nuestra junta”, dijo Rob Radtke, presidente de la ERD. “Nuestros asociados de la Iglesia ghanesa y mis colegas esperan compartir con los peregrinos nuestra labor de desarrollo de la comunidad basado en recursos en la parte norte del país, y más tarde viajar a Cabo Corso para orar y reflexionar sobre la trata trasatlántica de esclavos y la obra de reconciliación que se nos exige a todos nosotros como seguidores de Jesús”.Gran Bretaña abolió la trata de esclavos en 1807; el presidente de Estados Unidos Thomas Jefferson firmó una ley que prohibía la importación de esclavos. La Iglesia Episcopal e individuos episcopales se beneficiaron de la trata de esclavos. La 75ª. Convención General buscó abordar el papel de la Iglesia en la esclavitud.Los peregrinos compartirán fotos, ideas y vídeos de su experiencia en una página designada de Facebook, donde episcopales y otras personas pueden seguir su viaje. La cobertura escrita y un vídeo de Episcopal News Service reportará la peregrinación.“Esperamos que personas de todas partes orarán y se unirán a nuestro testimonio de reconciliación en Facebook. La mayoría de nosotros nunca hará el viaje a Ghana. Nunca veremos los campamentos donde los africanos esclavizados eran hacinados antes de que los desarraigaran de su tierra natal, ni veremos la iglesia anglicana que se levanta como una bendición detrás del principal mercado de esclavos. Luego, nosotros iremos y reflexionaremos y filmaremos y regresaremos para ayudar a toda la Iglesia a mantenerse responsable y cambiante”, dijo Spellers.— Lynette Wilson es editora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

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