Australia Women through but New Zealand out

first_img… Star player Ellyse Perry in doubt for Thursday’s semi-finalsDEFENDING champions Australia avoided an early exit at the Women’s T20 World Cup with a four-run victory over New Zealand in Melbourne putting them into the semi-finals.Beth Mooney (60) and Georgia Wareham (3-17) starred for tournament hosts Australia, who join England, India and South Africa in the final four.However, they could be without star player Ellyse Perry in Thursday’s semi-final after the all-rounder went off injured with an apparent hamstring injury sustained while fielding.Perry was visibly emotional as she was helped off the field and captain Meg Lanning admitted “it didn’t look good” in an interview at the end of the match.Australia will learn their semi-final opponents today. If South Africa beat West Indies in Sydney, they will leapfrog England in Group B and face Australia. If the Windies win, it will be England against Lanning’s side.HOSTS HITTING FORM AT THE RIGHT TIMEAustralia’s margin of victory was closer than it appeared on the field as New Zealand managed to take the game deep despite always being behind the run-rate and losing regular wickets.Leg-spinner Wareham was the decisive factor with the ball as she dismissed three of New Zealand’s top four.First she successfully reviewed an lbw decision against Suzie Bates before deceiving both Sophie Devine (31) and Maddy Green (28) and having them expertly stumped by the peerless Alyssa Healy.Megan Schutt made up for dropping a sitter by taking three wickets of her own in an Australia display which continues their improvement since a shock 17-run defeat by India in the tournament’s opening game.“It was a crunch game and we handled it very well,” said Australia captain Lanning. “For Georgia to come in and bowl so well is a credit to her.“The Bangladesh game (last time out) was a turning point for us. We played a lot more like how we play. We are looking forward to our next challenge.“We were calm when under the pump and did the basics well. It gives us a lot of confidence going into the semi-final.”Desperate to assert themselves in what was effectively a quarter-final, Australia lost the key wickets of Healy (9) and Lanning (21) early on to aggressive shots.However, Mooney (60) played a classy and stabilising knock which laid the platform for a winning total.From there, Perry (21 off 15 balls) and Rachael Haynes (19 not out off 8) delivered punchy cameos which took the total beyond 150 and heaped the pressure on the White Ferns.What was particularly impressive about Australia’s batting effort – and was perhaps the difference in a tight contest – was their running between the wickets and ability to cut down on the opposition’s ability to bowl dot balls.“You can always go back over the 120 balls and find something you could do better,” said New Zealand captain Sophie Devine.“Credit to Australia, they’re a great team and I wish them well going forward.“The beauty of this tournament now is that it’s hard to pick a winner from the four teams left.”last_img read more

Read More »

From Camp Randall to Iraq

first_imgWith his Wisconsin football career over, Jake Wood’s next choice was simple. The real estate/urban land economics and political science double major knew just where to look for a job: Iraq.”I have always wanted to serve in the military and do something for my country, so since we were still at war when I graduated, the choice was easy,” Wood said in an e-mail to The Badger Herald.Almost immediately after playing in his last game — Wisconsin’s 24-21 loss to Georgia in the 2005 Outback Bowl — Wood began his training for the Marine Corps, but he had made up his choice long before then.”It was in his family and his lifelong dream was to be a Marine,” former teammate Lyle Maiava said. “He talked about it ever since our freshman year. I’d go back home with him to Iowa, and he’d be showing me pictures of his grandfather in the Marines.”I always knew he was going to go into the military,” Maiava added. “I just didn’t think it’d be right after football. After that last bowl game, he went straight into his training and lost a lot of weight.”It didn’t hurt that after graduating with a business degree and a few internships, Wood finally realized that a suit and tie just wouldn’t cut it for him. He also realized that he was the perfect type of person to serve in the military with his family background, physical training as a 6-foot-6, 296-pound offensive lineman and just overall desire.”I just know that I have the physical and mental capacity to do it, and I knew I owed this country something for all the opportunities it had given me, such as being able to attend Wisconsin and play football,” Wood said.Although Wood has been in Iraq for five months now, Wisconsin football is still in his thoughts. He thinks about it in the bunkers, when he’s weight training and any other free time he has.When Wood is able to have Internet access, he keeps in touch with former teammates such as Maiava and checks how the Badgers are doing. He even tried to get off of work this past weekend to see where Joe Thomas, his old friend on UW’s offensive line, would be selected in the NFL Draft.”Apparently that didn’t fit in with our mission for the day,” Wood said.Wood’s best memory as a Badger: “Beating Ohio State’s ass my junior year (2003) at home in the rain when they were coming off their national championship. When the students rushed the field, it was unbelievable; it was the ultimate statement of Badger pride.”But Wood hasn’t had the opportunity to so much as even touch a pigskin while in service. In Iraq, there’s only one sport to play.”The sport of choice is called ‘stay alive,’ and that one never ends,” Wood said. “We have no time for anything organized. … We can’t even go outside our hootches without full gear and a rifle, [but] that’d be a hell of a game actually now that I think about it.”About the only thing athletically Wood is able to do is lift weights, and he’s been doing a lot of it. Wood introduced two of his co-workers to the weight-lifting program he was on at Wisconsin and now their goal is “to get freakin’ huge by the end of the deployment.”But while Wood keeps UW in his heart, it doesn’t distract him one bit while he’s on duty, even when work gets boring, which happens quite often.”The typical day is usually boring as hell,” Wood said. “We generally patrol for anywhere between six to 20 hours in a day. (In) 95 percent of the patrols, nothing is going to happen and you know it, but the second you let your guard down, that 5 percent inevitably happens, and it quickly dissolves into a nightmare.”Wood’s platoon has been fortunate: That 5 percent has rarely occurred, but the group has experienced it all.”We’ve been hit by improvised explosive devices (IEDs or booby traps), we’ve been ambushed by machine guns, hit by snipers, taken mortar fire,” Wood said. “But it’s not every day like the news makes it out.”Despite the catastrophes, Wood still stays on track with his mission. His job is to run counter-insurgency ops — that is, gather intelligence on area insurgents and act on it. In the end, Wood’s task is to safely continue in civil affairs with local Iraqis by building schools or getting water and power to people who haven’t had such resources in decades.While the possibility of missing the 2007 Wisconsin football season remains for the ex-Badger, his former teammates say Wood’s work in Iraq defines him more than anything else.”That’s Jake for you,” Maiava said. “He’s all about honoring the USA and patriotism. He looks forward to representing the country any way he can.”last_img read more

Read More »

‘WE NEED MORE ANSWERS ON FERRY CASE’ – VICTIM

first_imgDonal O LoinsighTHE victims of paedophile school caretaker Micheal Ferry say they’ve been left with too many unanswered questions following the publication of a HSE investigation into the scandal.Yesterday morning we revealed how social workers failed to properly investigate Ferry after his conviction in 2002 for the abuse of a boy at Ardscoil Mhuire in Gaoth Dobhair. As a result, and as a result of many failure elsewhere, Ferry went on to abuse more boys on the premises until he was arrested there EIGHT YEARS LATER. Victims say they are deeply unhappy and disturbed that no-one at Colaiste  Cholmcille has been held accountable whatsoever for their actions  – and inactions – during the scandal.The DPP says they did nothing wrong and will not face any criminal prosecution whatsoever. The directors have consistently denied any wrongdoing, insist Ferry was not ’employed’ there.One of those directors – Donal O Loinsigh – was in court in October 2002 when Ferry pleaded guilty to sickening attacks on a young boy. Mr O Loinsigh heard a judge put Ferry on the sex offenders register for SEVEN years.Mr O Loinsigh would have been familiar with child protection issues having worked as a teacher for many years in Terenure, Dublin.Yet Colaiste Cholmcille continued to pay Michael Ferry as caretaker of their Ardscoil Mhuire premises.“How can the directors say he wasn’t working there when Mickey Ferry was arrested on the grounds of the college in 2010,” asked Derek Mulligan, the young Gaoth Dobhair man who has bravely spoken out on the affair since Ferry was jailed in 2011 for 14 years for abusing him and three other boys.“It was known locally he was working there. The HSE now says they shouldn’t have taken the word of the directors and acted appropriately.“Why weren’t the victims interviewed by gardai in relation to their DPP investigation? I wasn’t and I know others weren’t either? I’d like to get some clarification on that..“On reading the findings of the HSE report I find it incredible that the DPP found no grounds to prosecute the directors. Why aren’t we getting the promised Garda report that alan shatter promised us in 2012?“We are now taking legal advice on how we deal with the DPP decision. We will have to take Ireland to the European Court of Human Rights now because it looks like there is no justice in this country.”Michael Ferry was seen with young college students in Dunlewey in April 2006. The person who saw him is the sister of the first victim (in the 2002 case). She made a formal complaint to Gardai. The HSE has no record of this complaint. Gardai did call a college director to once again warn that Ferry was a paedophile.At this time Michael Ferry was continuing to abuse children in both Dunlewey and in Gaoth Dobhair.“We want answers,” said Derek Mulligan.“We are going to get them.”‘WE NEED MORE ANSWERS ON FERRY CASE’ – VICTIM was last modified: April 4th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:abuse inquiryderek mulliganDonal O LoinsighHSEMichael Ferrypaedophilevictimlast_img read more

Read More »

Rosses in mourning as Olympic hero Pa Sharkey sadly passes away……

first_imgTributes have been paid to the late, great Pa Sharkey following his death yesterday morning. Sharkey was a brilliant boxer who won a number of Irish title before he emigrated in search of employment.While he was based in Australia, Sharkey got the opportunity to represent Ireland at the Olympic Games in Melbourne in 1956. Sharkey was a major contractor in the UK, and spent most of his time in Leeds, he employed many young people from the Rosses over the years, and was one of the areas most popular characters.He was a trustee in Naomh Muire GAA club, and was also heavily involved in the redevelopment works at The Banks in the 90’s.The club paid the following tribute to him on their Facebook timeline:“It was with sadness that we learned this morning of the death of our Club trustee Pa Sharkey. Pa passed away after recent illness with his family by his side. “Pa Sharkey was prominent in the development of the Banks in the mid 1990s, something in which he took tremendous pride. He was of course an Olympian, having boxed for Ireland in the Melbourne Olympic games of 1956, something we were all proud of knowing we had such sporting history in our midst. “Pa was a major contractor in the Leeds area employing many from the Rosses and beyond. Most of all he was a great family man, husband, brother, father, uncle and grandfather to his extended family to whom we extend our condolences at this time. “The Wake will commence at 6pm tonight at his home in Mullaghderg.“Private house from 11pm. The Wake will continue tomorrow Tuesday 10am -11pm. Funeral Mass will be in Kincasslagh on Wednesday at 11am with burial afterwards in Belcruit.”“Parking for the Wake will be at the Naomh Muire GAA car park.” Advertisement Ar dheis Dé go raibh a anam dílis  Rosses in mourning as Olympic hero Pa Sharkey sadly passes away…… was last modified: November 1st, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More »