Avian flu resurfaces in China and Thailand

first_imgJul 7, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Deadly strains of avian influenza have resurfaced on one poultry farm in China and two in Thailand.China’s first outbreak of H5N1 avian flu since March was reported Jul 3 at a farm in Anhui province in the east-central part of the country, according to Xinhua, China’s official news service. The national avian flu reference laboratory confirmed yesterday that the disease was due to an H5N1 virus, Xinhua said.In a report filed with OIE (the World Organization for Animal Health), Chinese authorities said 1,520 birds on the farm had died of the disease and the remaining 6,640 were killed to contain the outbreak. Xinhua said all poultry within 3 kilometers of the farm were slaughtered, and poultry within 5 kilometers of the affected area were vaccinated.Because the farm is close to a lake, health officials suspected the disease came from migratory waterfowl, according to OIE. An Agriculture Ministry official said the outbreak has been contained but gave no details, according to an Associated Press (AP) report today.The Thai outbreaks occurred on two farms north of Bangkok, according to news services. Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported today that 7,000 birds on a farm in Ayatthaya province had died in the past 2 weeks, and the rest of the 44,000-bird flock has been slaughtered.In the neighboring province of Pathum Thani, officials killed another 800 chickens after 70 had died of suspected avian flu, the AFP report said. It said officials had banned poultry transport in the two areas and ordered further testing for the virus across the country.Both AFP and Reuters reported that the Thai government had confirmed the presence of H5N1 avian flu in the outbreaks, but other reports suggested that the virus subtype had not been determined.A Bangkok Post report today quoted officials as saying they had not yet confirmed H5N1 virus in the Ayatthaya outbreak. Yukol Limlaemthong, head of the government’s livestock development department, told the newspaper the department needed a few more days to identify the virus. Reports that Yukol filed with the OIE identified the virus in both outbreaks as “type A (H5).”The Post report charged that the government had failed to promptly warn the public about the new outbreak in Ayatthaya province. It quoted Yukol as saying his department had told the OIE about the outbreak Jul 3 but had not notified the public at the same time, “because we assumed that Thai people no longer care about the re-emergence of bird flu, which has become an ordinary incident here.”The last avian flu outbreak in Thailand was reported on a research farm in late May, but it was not clear whether the virus was H5N1. The outbreak report came less than 2 weeks after agricultural officials had voiced confidence that the country was free of the disease.H5N1 avian flu was blamed for widespread outbreaks in eight Asian countries earlier this year, resulting in the slaughter of about 100 million poultry. The virus also caused 34 human illness cases with 23 deaths, according to the World Health Organization. Thailand was among the hardest-hit countries, with 12 human cases and 8 deaths.Vietnam, which also had major outbreaks of avian flu earlier this year, had an H5 outbreak in late June on three farms in the Mekong Delta. Shortly before that, testing of about 10,000 poultry throughout the country had yielded many samples that were positive for an H5 virus.See also:OIE update on avian flu in Asiahttp://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/A_AI-Asia.htmlast_img read more

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Election security rated strong in Indiana

first_imgVoters with questions can call the Hoosier Voter Hotline at 866-IN-1-VOTE. Indianapolis, In. — Secretary of State Connie Lawson takes great care to prepare for each election. In preparation for the upcoming election, Secretary Lawson has proactively worked to implement new security measures and resources to protect Hoosiers’ votes.Voters should know that no piece of Indiana’s voting equipment is online. The machines and tabulators are not connected to the internet.Some of the tools and precautions being taken in Indiana to ensure secure elections include:Testing voting equipment prior to useAll voting equipment in Indiana is tested by the Voting System Technical Oversight Program, hosted by Ball State University, for an added layer of safety and security. In addition, each county conducts public test of voting equipment prior to the election.Risk and vulnerability testingThe U.S. Department of Homeland Security has conducted risk and vulnerability testing to secure Indiana’s electronic information. This includes the statewide voter registration system and the state election website. “I take the security of our elections process very seriously,” said Secretary Lawson. “I am working diligently to ensure that every available defense is utilized. Indiana has taken many steps to secure our elections, but let’s be clear: there will always be new recommendations, new technology, and new best practices where cybersecurity is concerned. The way we administer elections must continue to evolve, because this is a race without a finish line. I am fully committed to ensuring that we continue to move forward, using every tool at our disposal to maintain safe and secure voting for all Hoosiers.”center_img Multifactor Authentication ProtocolIndiana has invested in security by requiring two-factor authentication to access electronic information.Intrusion Detection SystemsThese systems monitor internet traffic accessing websites and databases.Security ProtocolState law establishes physical security standards for election equipment. Many county election boards adopt customized security resolutions above and beyond what is required by state law.Information SharingIndiana has partnered with the Election Infrastructure Information Sharing and Analysis Center. This provides access to 24/7 security information, threat notifications and security advisories.last_img read more

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O’Brien dominates Derby possibles

first_img The son of Galileo, who is a general 6-1 market leader, is one of 21 horses in the £1.325 million contest on June 6 for trainer Aidan O’Brien. The master of Ballydoyle, responsible for the last three winners of the mile-and-a-half Classic, can also call on Group Two winners Highland Reel and Ol’ Man River. Press Association Ante-post favourite John F Kennedy heads the 102 entries left in this year’s Investec Derby following the latest forfeit stage.center_img Godolphin have 11 contenders, including the unbeaten Charlie Appleby trained Festive Fare, as does Sheikh Hamdan Al Maktoum, whose entries feature Royal Lodge Stakes runner-up Nafaqa and the highly regarded Algaith, both trained by Barry Hills. Five-time Derby-winning trainer Sir Michael Stoute has eight contenders going forward, headed by winning debutants Consort and Peterhof along with Sandown maiden winner Dartmouth, who is owned by the Queen. Newmarket handler Hugo Palmer has Kempton maiden winner Spanish Squeeze entered. Palmer said: “I am very happy with Spanish Squeeze at this stage – he has filled out and wintered really well. “On official ratings, Spanish Squeeze has got a long way to go before Epsom but I do hold him in the highest possible regard and hopefully he will confirm that.” There are eight French-trained entries, topped by the Aga Khan-owned and Alan de Royer-Dupre-trained pair of Zarkar and Zourkhan. Andre Fabre, who sent out Pour Moi to win the 2011 renewal, has Harlem, Heredity and Hipparchus for owner Khalid Abdullah. The unraced Andreas Wohler-trained Rogue Runner is one of two German entries, and six owned by Qatar Racing, who also share an entry in Indian Monsoon with Al Shaqab Racing, who have four separate possibles still remaining. A second entry stage, where Racing Post Trophy winner Elm Park and Goffs Vincent O’Brien National Stakes winner Gleneagles are likely to enter the fray, will take place on April 7. last_img read more

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