Two Sumatra regencies report sudden death of pigs

first_imgThe South Nias Agriculture Agency confirmed separately that thousands of pigs in the particular region had died of unknown causes recently. Up to 3,000 pigs died in Susua district alone, and another 670 in Mazo district.”The residents feel troubled by the incident. They think that the pigs have died of hog cholera [or classical swine fever] but that has yet to be proven,” the agency’s head, Norododo Sarumaha, said.At least 42,000 pigs have died of ASF in 18 regions in North Sumatra in the past few months. The regions affected include Deli Serdang, Karo, Medan, North Tapanuli, Samosir and Simalungun.North Sumatra Food Security and Animal Husbandry Agency head Azhar Harahap said previously that the administration had taken steps to prevent any future outbreaks, such as stepping up biosecurity measures by making it mandatory for pig breeders to clean pig enclosures with standardized disinfectants.The first ASF outbreak occurred in China in 2018, he explained. The virus later spread to Hong Kong, the Philippines and Timor Leste. The outbreak in North Sumatra began in October last year, he added. (vny)Topics : The Medan Veterinary Center in North Sumatra has dispatched a team to probe the recent death of hundreds of pigs in the regencies of Nias and South Nias.The office’s head, Agustia, said Tuesday that sudden deaths of the animals had constantly been reported in the past month. “Between 300 and 400 pigs have died in the two regions within the last month. It’s a quite big number,” said Agustia. She said the team had secured blood samples of the dead livestock to be tested at its laboratory, which would require around seven to 14 days. “With that, we can eventually find out whether the death was caused by the African swine fever [ASF] or other factors,” she added.ASF had killed thousands of pigs across North Sumatra between the end of last year and the beginning of this year, but Agustina claimed that Nias Island was relatively safe from the outbreak. No sudden deaths of pigs were reported in the region at that time.Read also: ASF outbreak only hit, killing pigs in North Sumatra: Ministerlast_img read more

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Syracuse retires McNabb’s jersey at halftime of Wake Forest game

first_img Published on November 2, 2013 at 2:29 pm Contact Stephen: [email protected] | @Stephen_Bailey1 Facebook Twitter Google+ As Donovan McNabb’s gaze crossed over his recently unveiled jersey hanging on the Carrier Dome wall above Section 330, a smile spread across his face.McNabb was standing near midfield when his lips perked up and widened, revealing his hearty smile. Former teammates on the field and fans throughout the Dome turned to look at the newly immortalized white jersey at halftime of the scoreless Syracuse-Wake Forest game on Saturday.“This is a very special occasion for me because it’s a chance for me to be here with family and my former teammates,” McNabb said. “None of this would’ve been possible without all of my teammates standing behind me right now.”After redshirting his first year at Syracuse, McNabb started every game for the next four. He led the Orange to a 35-14 record from 1995-98, breaking the school record for passing yards as a junior and leading SU to the Orange Bowl as a senior. He finished fifth in Heisman Trophy voting that season, completing a career-best 62.6 percent of his passes and tallying 30 total touchdowns — 22 with his arm and eight with his legs.In 2000, he was named Big East Player of the Decade for the 1990s.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn the Dome, before the black curtain was dropped, SU Athletics played a tribute video of McNabb’s SU career on the video boards. Then, Athletic Director Daryl Gross presented McNabb with a framed jersey of his own.McNabb, dressed in an orange tie and handkerchief, lifted the plaque up toward the SU fans.“Syracuse will be back,” McNabb said, “but we’ll never forget playing here on this field.” Commentslast_img read more

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Young Badgers looking to surprise

first_img2010 was a season of mixed results for the Wisconsin volleyball team.The Badgers jumped out to a promising 11-0 start, tying for the best start in school history. But the team couldn’t continue the trend, as it posted a 16-15 overall record to finish the season. The Badgers wrapped up their first winning season since 2008, but failed to reach the NCAA tournament and went 5-15 in conference play.Many of the struggles in the Big Ten came from the Badgers’ lack of consistency in close sets, as the team went 6-12 in sets decided by two points. In 2011, the Badgers will look to polish their consistency in close contests.“We lost quite a few sets by two points last season, and our goal is to turn that into wins,” head coach Pete Waite said. “Mental toughness is key to finishing off the long sets, especially late in the season.”Lack of consistent results stemmed from an inconsistent starting lineup, as the Badgers used 12 different combinations throughout the season to adjust to injuries and inconsistent play.“We’ve gone through injuries that made it hard to go through our business like we were used to,” Waite said. “Sometimes multiple injuries and youth make a big difference over the course of a long season.”Waite’s squad was also one of the youngest in the conference. Carrying just seven upperclassmen on a team of 17, the Badgers will be in more or less of a similar situation, as only five upperclassmen fill the ranks of the current squad. With six new incoming freshmen, the team will be ripe with new faces and talent.However, don’t be surprised if those new young faces make a big difference right away.“The way volleyball is now at the high school and club level, it’s getting so much higher and closer to the college game,” junior Alexis Mitchell said. “We have a lot of freshmen that have played at the international level and a high level at club so they know the game extremely well. The only big adjustment for the freshman is a little faster game tempo and new teammates. The freshmen we have are definitely one of the top 10 recruiting classes in the nation.”Chemistry will be one of the Badgers’ biggest issues in the early part of the season. While the team returns five key players, including senior captain Janelle Gabrielsen and Mitchell, the returning members will need to learn how to mesh with the younger players and their playing styles in the early weeks of the season.“Chemistry is so important in volleyball because it’s not a sport you can do by yourself,” Mitchell said. “Not one person can get the job done; all six people on the court need to be flowing and working together at all times. You can get beat by any team that has great chemistry; if you don’t have it you can get beat any day.Those words ring especially true in the Big Ten, where the competition is perhaps the stiffest in the nation. Entering the final week of August, seven of the 12 teams in the conference were ranked, including Penn State at No. 2 overall and newcomer Nebraska at No. 5.“You have to be prepared for every team in the conference,” Gabrielsen said. “You always have to scout and prepare for every team. You can’t be unprepared for any team in the Big Ten the way it is with the level of talent and competition.”With less than a month to prepare for the opening conference match against Northwestern Sept. 23, Wisconsin hopes to use its early non-conference matches to find its identity. By that time, the Badgers hope to have a solidified rotation and starting lineup to give them the consistency they lacked last year.“Once we get into the Big Ten schedule, we want to have the same lineup so there’s a familiarity with each other’s play,” Mitchell said. “People on our team have really been fighting in these early games to show what they’re made of to earn a spot. It’s a time to prove yourself during non-conference play.”“We know that coming into Wisconsin and every preseason, we are in the toughest volleyball conference in the country,” Mitchell added. “There is some stress there because we want to finish at the top and get back to the tournament, but we use it as motivation. Knowing we’re going up against great competition will only make us better, and we just have to have high confidence. With the top teams and Nebraska coming in, they may look at us as the team we were last season and think they can walk all over us, but they’re in for a surprise.”last_img read more

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