Reporter’s car is chased and rammed while he is guarded by police

first_img Organisation November 19, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Reporter’s car is chased and rammed while he is guarded by police RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive News Investigative journalist Lirio Abbate’s car was pursued and rammed last week in Rome although his police bodyguards were with him at the time. Abbate, who is on the Reporters Without Borders list of “information heroes,” is well known for his coverage of the mafia. It was not the first time he has been the victim of an act of intimidation. Ten RSF recommendations for the European Union ItalyEurope – Central Asia Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information to go further On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia ItalyEurope – Central Asia News A reporter for the newsweekly L’Espresso and an information heroe for Reporters Without Borders, Abbate has had police protection since 2007 because of the many threats he has received from the mafia. When Abbate left L’Espresso at round 10 p.m. on 11 November in an unmarked police car with two policemen, another car pursued them through central Rome, rammed them and then drove off. After a brief chase, one of Abbate’s police bodyguards managed to arrest the driver but the passenger got away on foot. The documents found in the car belong to an Egyptian citizen who is not known to the police. When questioned at a nearby police station, the driver denied any knowledge of what took place.Shortly before this incident, a TV station broadcast an interview with Abbate in which he revealed details of his investigation into the presence in Rome of mafia families from outside the city and their collaboration with local criminals. Francesca Fagnani, the journalist who interviewed Abbate, received death threats on the programme’s website.Abbate has done a lot of investigative reporting on organized crime in Rome in recent years. He was the target of another act of intimidation when one of his stories was published in L’Espresso in mid-September. A bullet with the message “This is for Abbate” was found on the seat of a stolen car that was left badly parked near L’Espresso’s office.Last week’s incident was the first in Italy in which a journalist has been attacked while being escorted by police officers.Italy is ranked 49th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. December 2, 2020 Find out more News RSF_en Follow the news on Italy News November 23, 2020 Find out more November 19, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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German investors rank corruption top exclusion criteria

first_imgSustainable investment strategies are still mostly based on exclusion criteria, used by 99% of funds and mandates.Standards-based screening applies to almost 95% of sustainable funds and mandates, and environmental, social, and governance (ESG) integration to 79% of the assets in funds and mandates, an almost 10% increase in 2019 compared to the previous year.ESG integration is already an integral part of the strategy for most asset managers. It covers a large part of the classic investment universe and is well anchored in the analysis processes.According to the study, based on a survey of asset managers in German-speaking countries with total assets of €2trn, institutional investors represented the largest share of cash deployed in sustainable funds and mandates with €154bn, up 27% in 2019 compared to the prior year.The demand for green investments from private investors, however, rose strongly by 96% last year to €18.3bn.McClellan said: “We believe that this trend of sustainable investments by private investors will continue” because EU rules requiring investors to ask their clients about sustainable investments will apply from mid next year.She added that institutional investors still have a share of 89% of the demand for sustainable investments. German investors put corruption on top of the list of exclusion criteria to deploy sustainable investments, according to a study conducted by the Forum Nachhaltige Geldanlagen (FNG), the industry association promoting sustainable investment in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.“To determine the level of corruption of a company, it is important that a firm has an anti-corruption policy in place and a code of conduct that is clearly communicated to the employees,” Angela McClellan, FNG’s chief executive officer, told IPE.It is critical not only to use the code of conduct and to list violations, but also that breaking rules has consequences, she added.“Corruption relates to the governance and points at how important the leadership and governance of a company is for its sustainability performance,” she said. “We believe that this trend of sustainable investments by private investors will continue”Angela McClellan, FNG’s CEOAmong institutional investors, church institutions and charities took 26.7% of the share of the pie in 2019, down from 40% in 2018, followed by insurance companies and mutual associations with 18.6%, the public sector with 16.6% and public Pensionsfonds with 12.8%.The five largest asset manager firms handle 77% of all sustainable assets in Germany, and many smaller financial service providers, some specialised in sustainability, share the rest of the market.The majority of investments are in equities, corporate bonds and government bonds, while 7% is in alternative investment products such as liquid assets or real estate.The study calculated that in Germany sustainable investments grew by 23% in 2019 to €263.3bn, including €120.3bn in mandates (+36%) and €63.2bn throguh investment funds, up 41% compared to 2018.For the German Investment and Asset Management association (BVI), the total volume of funds and mandates in Germany reached €3.4trn as of December 2019, a 15% growth compared to 2018.The sustainable investment market rose twice as fast at 37%, with a share of sustainable funds and mandates of around 5.4% of the total fund market, a 0.9% growth compared to the previous year.“In Germany, sustainable investments have grown constantly,” said McClellan.She added that the most important driver of sustainable investments is in particular the EU regulatory framework.“All the players in the finance market have to disclose how they deal with sustainability risks, and this is also an aspect that drives sustainable investments, in particular for responsible investments,” she said.McClellan believes that the coronavirus crisis “leads to thinking about how to include sustainable finance criteria in the public aid packages to support the economy and to set the course for the future.”FNG differentiates between sustainable investments, where ESG criteria are applied at product level, and responsible investments, where the ESG criteria are defined at the institutional level, she explained.Responsible investments progressed by €114bn, or 7% growth, to over €1.6trn in 2019 compared to the previous year.ESG integration is the prevalent investment strategy for responsible investments, applying to 95% of responsibly managed assets, according to the study.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here.last_img read more

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Rangers boss backs ‘incredible’ Wenger

first_imgHarry Redknapp has insisted that Arsene Wenger does not deserve the criticism the Arsenal manager has received.Many Gunners fans have called for the Frenchman to go, but Redknapp believes Arsenal will secure another top-four finish this season despite some poor displays.The QPR boss, who takes his side to the Emirates Stadium on Boxing Day, said: “I can’t believe Arsene Wenger would get any stick.“Arsenal are a good side and I still think they’ll finish in the top four. I can’t see them being out of it.“They do it every year and I don’t see why they won’t do it again this year. They’ve got some excellent players.“The pace that they play at, with the movement and passing, they’re a good team to watch that’s for sure.“Arsene Wenger has been an incredible manager for Arsenal – a fantastic manager – and I’m sure he’ll continue to do that for as long as he wants to.”Rangers head to north London having lost all of their nine away matches this season, with eight of those defeats coming in the league.“We’ll give it our best and see if we can pick up a result,” Redknapp said.“It’s a tough game but we went to Chelsea and played well and we need to go to Arsenal and play well. We need to pick up some points away from home if we can.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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WEF raises South Africa’s global competitiveness ranking

first_imgSouth Africa has risen two places, to 47th, in the 2016 World Economic Forum Global Competitive Index, improving its ranking in 10 of the 12 pillars measured. The country has the most competitive economy on the African continent.The newly released World Economic Forum Global Competitive Index ranks South Africa as the 47th most completive economy of the 138 studied. The improvement in the rankings, the best in five years, comes as the country has improved both the competitiveness of our markets and relationships between labour and business, made modest, but important, progress in the quality of education, which is up five places from 2015.One reason for South Africa’s rise in the annual appraisal of prosperity and productivity is, according to the report, our ability to withstand the fall in price of commodities. Unlike African neighbours and other developing economies, South Africa has also built on the strength of its financial sector, which shielded the country from the worst effects of the global economic crisis.South Africa is ranked first out of 138 countries for auditing standards, the protection of minority investors and ability to finance through equity markets. The country is second or third for soundness of banks and financial services, efficacy of boards and regulation of the stock exchange.Robert Crotti, a WEF economist, explained to the Biznews website: “What we noticed is that to make a country really competitive, you need to have all the pieces in place. To rank number one in one specific dimension without having the other factors also well-placed, doesn’t really bring the country to grow and reach the prosperity where we see. In fact, when we look at the top countries in ranking, they tend to rank quite high on all the dimensions.”The report highlighted the biggest future challenges for our economy. “Infrastructure development has stalled, both in transport and electricity, with power shortages experienced this year. Institutional quality has diminished, with increased political uncertainty, less transparency, some security concerns, and business leaders having less trust in politicians (down 11 places since last year).”Crotti said the GCI is not meant as a criticism of each economy studied. For WEF it is a way to benchmark progress. “Therefore, we hope that it can be used as a platform for all the actors in the economy in looking at how and what worked, to then take the next steps to improve their economy.”South Africa’s growth forecast for 2016 is now set at 0.1%. Outside factors, slowdown of the Chinese economy and the volatility of the rand have dampened the potential for stronger growth. Where developed economies are accepting a “new normal” of lower economic growth, lower productivity growth, and high unemployment, South Africa and other developing economies have an opportunity to grow by improving productivity.Despite China’s slowdown it is the best-placed Brics nation, at 28, followed by India, Russia and South Africa. Brazil lags behind its Brics peers at 81. As Crotti explained, “India is really the bright spark in the area of competitiveness improvements and this is done mainly on the back of reforms, especially in terms of investment and market efficiency.”Crotti said India, more than any other country, should be the example South Africa follows to move further up the rankings. The Indian government has improved market and labour efficiencies, and stabilised government policy and the macroeconomic sector. As important, its government has improved the country’s technological readiness.”That’s really important to be able to jump-start the economy and as we’ve seen, also be able to gain innovation,” Crotti said. “To learn much more about technology and innovation. At the dawn of this Fourth Industrial Revolution it is really going to be key going forward.”South Africa.info reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

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