Australia embrace guided missile technology in Ashes quest

first_imgAustralia are resorting to guided missile technology to help their fast bowlers reclaim the Ashes from England next year.Steve Smith’s team have been grappling with injuries in their pace attack with Peter Siddle and James Pattinson out of action, while Mitchell Starc has just recovered after being sidelined since November with a foot fracture.TORPEDO TECHNOLOGYThe upcoming tour of Sri Lanka will see the Australian bowlers embrace the “torpedo technology”, using “smart algorithms” planted in a wearable tracking device, to track and reduce injuries to the pacemen.Sports scientists at Australian Catholic University’s School of Exercise Science developed the algorithms and have recommended in a report in the British Journal of Sports Medicine that cricket coaches use them.”These ‘smart algorithms’ rely on the interaction of the accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes housed within the wearable unit – the same technology used to navigate submarines, guided missiles and spacecraft,” the report’s co-author Dr Tim Gabbett said.Existing methods of measuring the workload of the bowler only take into account the number of deliveries bowled and not the intensity and effort required.AUSSIES GO HI-TECH”Tagging individual balls with an intensity measure provides both immediate analysis such as identifying effort balls, or potentially a drop in performance due to fatigue, or longer term workload analysis,” Dean McNamara, the other co-author, added.”Measuring bowling intensity for individual balls or sessions provides context for the acute and chronic workload of the individual bowler, and ultimately the preparedness of the bowler for the maximal workload of the immediate competition.”advertisementThe researchers have also assisted the Wales rugby union team, who take on world champions New Zealand in a three-test series next month, and believe the technology could be applicable in baseball, tennis, football and many other sports.last_img read more

Read More »

Facebook Denies Being a Social Network in Lawsuit Response

first_img Next Article Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images via PC Mag Facebook Denies Being a Social Network in Lawsuit Response Facebook Facebook denies a consumer can create an account, make friends, and build a social network, which are all things you can do on Facebook… Matthew Humphries Register Now » July 12, 2019 2 min readcenter_img This story originally appeared on PCMag Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Senior Editor Add to Queue Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business 67shares This week, Facebook responded to a lawsuit relating to the Cambridge Analytica scandal by claiming it isn’t a social network and not somewhere you can make friends.As Ars Technica reports, the lawsuit was filed in December last year by District of Columbia (DC) attorney general Karl Racine. It stated that of the 70 million individuals who had personal information taken by Cambridge Analytica, 340,000 were residents of DC. Racine is demanding $5,000 in civil penalties per resident, which would mean Facebook has to pay out $1.7 billion.As you’d expect, the social network is fighting the case hard. The reason it has taken so long for a response to be forthcoming is because Facebook spent nearly seven months attempting to get the lawsuit dismissed. That isn’t happening thanks to a federal judge.Facebook’s response is heavy on the denials, with a “denies the allegations” being stated for most of the 76 paragraphs contained in the lawsuit filing. Curiously, one flat out denial covers Paragraph 11, which states:To begin using the Facebook website, a consumer first creates a Facebook account. The consumer can then add other Facebook consumers as “friends” and by accumulating Facebook friends, the consumer builds a social network on the Facebook website.So Facebook is denying it’s a destination that allows consumers to sign-up, add their friends, and build a social network. I’m pretty sure that’s the functionality Facebook’s entire business model is based upon, which makes this a suspicious and confusing response. Is this a lawyer that’s being a bit heavy handed with copy-pasting a denial, or some tactic in law to try and derail the lawsuit?Overall, Facebook’s defense against this lawsuit comes down to the fact it was a third-party and not Facebook directly that improperly obtained personal data. If that isn’t accepted by the court, then the social network (yes, it is one) may have to pay out billions, especially as this lawsuit is surely only going to be the first of many if it proves successful.last_img read more

Read More »