Solo travellers are not lonely people

first_imgAre solo travellers lonely people who are deprived of a suitable company and forced to go alone? No, says a study, adding that they are actually the most fun-loving people who want to enjoy it alone.Solo travellers do not go alone because they have to. They do it because they want to, the team from Queensland University of Technology (QUT) said.According to lead researcher Constanza Bianchi, there were a growing number of people who preferred to travel alone, despite having family and friends. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“Research shows solo travel is the fastest-growing tourism segment and figures support this with solo traveller numbers increasing by almost 20 per cent between 2007 and 2011,” Bianchi said.The solo travellers were choosing freedom, uncompromised fun and meeting new people over the desire to have a companion to share their experiences.Although most participants had family and friends, they chose to travel alone because they enjoyed it. Other motivations of travelling solo were feeling free, the possibility of meeting new people and the opportunity for self-discovery, the study found.A participant said: “You discover a lot about yourself and you learn to be at peace with your inner monologue due to time spent alone and the challenges you must overcome alone.”The study was published in the international journal of Tourism Research.last_img read more

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SXSW SelfDriving Audi to Make First CoasttoCoast US Drive

first_img Road trips just got more interesting. Today at SXSW, automotive supplier Delphi announced it will attempt the first-ever automated drive in North America. The journey will cover 3,500 miles and start March 22 in San Francisco near the Golden Gate bridge. The journey will end in Manhattan this April at the New York Auto Show.The test does more than just set records and grab headlines. It will test a variety of terrains and weather conditions allowing to Delphi to better develop safety technology for automotive clients such as Ford and GM. “Now it’s time to put our vehicles to the ultimate test,” said Jeff Owens, Delphi’s chief technology officer in a prepared statement.The trip is the latest in a string of automated road tests by companies in the space. This January, an Audi took a test drive of 550 miles to Las Vegas. Google’s self-driving cars have logged over 700,000 miles to date and while companies such as Mercedes- Benz, Uber and Apple are developing their own self-driving solutions.Related: Mercedes’ Self-Driving Car Says Hello to San FranciscoThe car, an Audi SQ5, will use a combination of sensors, radar and cameras to make human-like decisions, such as how to proceed at a four-way stop or when to make room for a bicyclist. The company says such real-world scenarios are difficult to fully test inside a lab.Unmanned, the car will take a southern route across the United States, avoiding mountains and snow, focusing mostly on highway driving. Remotely, Delphi engineers will monitor data processed by the car’s multi-domain controller, a sort of black box that acts as the car’s brain.Related: Apple Studies Self-Driving Car, Auto Industry Source SaysWhile Delphi has been developing many of these technologies for years, the company says tests like this one are necessary to keep pace with expanding needs and applications. “We have to be ready. Ford might go one way and GM another, “ says Kristen Kinley, global communications manager for Delphi. “We have to keep pace.” March 14, 2015 2 min readlast_img read more

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