Hubert Lawrence: Relay magic at Gibson-McCook Relays

first_img The day almost got off to a miserable start, but fans were rescued at the gate by organising committee chairman, Professor Rainford Wilks. It seemed that the main gate security team thought access should be granted at 9 a.m., the set time of the first race. Thanks to the professor’s intervention, all was well. The day that unfolded saw an injury-free return for Germany Gonzales, an early morning 4x400m jaunt for hurdles star Hansle Parchment and hot racing in the high school ranks. Thanks to a big anchor by James, STETHS edged St Jago in the boys’ 4x800m. Emerging Holmwood prospect, Williams outduelled the outstanding Bromfield after STETHS had already run three minutes 36.91 seconds in the morning heats. The second fastest time in qualifying was all of five seconds slower. Happily, the apparent injury to Calabar High’s Class Two sprint ace, Tyreke Wilson, has turned out to be nothing more serious than a cramp. Taylor, Michael Stephens and Dejour Russell retrieved the situation in the 4x100m final in spectacular fashion, but never appeared again for the day. With Champs just around the corner, caution was advisable. Those who thrive on records might have left disappointed. The rest of us went home invigorated by a great show and with Champs on the brain. – Hubert Lawrence has made notes at trackside since 1980. PROFESSOR’S INTERVENTION From a super-fast 4x400m run from the St Elizabeth Technical High School (STETHS) girls in the morning to Christopher Taylor’s zooming comeback for Calabar in Class Two, to the all-star run by Javauney James in the 4x800m, to the fascinating Ashley Williams-Junelle Bromfield duel in the 4x400m final, the 40th Gibson/McCook Relays was filled with baton magic. Despite the rain, the storied relay carnival delivered excitement as always. Curiously, the events inside the National Stadium have fans speaking of a new athletic power in the land, Sprintec Track Club. Based at the G.C. Foster College for Physical Education and led by noted coach Maurice Wilson, Sprintec took both 4x100m for Clubs and Institutions and put up real resistance in the men’s 4x400m final. It took a 44.8-second anchor by relay genius Javon Francis to reel in Sprintec. The 2015 Pan-Am 100m champion, Sherone Simpson, has rebuilt her career at Sprintec and Anastacia LeRoy may well be on the verge of moving up from her status as merely being a reliable member of the women’s 4x400m pool at major championships. Commonwealth 200m champion, Rasheed Dwyer, has been joined there by former Calabar High and Akan sprinter Oshane Bailey and the results are promising. To be fair, neither Racers nor MVP turned up at full strength. That meant no Usain Bolt, no Warren Weir, no Kemar Bailey-Cole and no Johan Blake from Racers; and no Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and no Elaine Thompson from the MVP. Two weeks earlier, MVP’s Carrie Russell, Thompson, Andrea Reid-Goodwin and Fraser-Pryce won the 4x100m at the Western Relays in 43.31 seconds. That’s 0.3 faster than the winning time last Saturday night. Still, the Sprintec efforts at Gibson/McCook were notable. The win in the men’s 4x100m was eye-catching at 38.59 seconds despite cool and wet conditions. It’s great to have another source of athletic excellence to join the established clubs. The hope is that others will rise up, too.last_img read more

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Watch for Falling Amino Acids

first_img(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 A long-standing problem of origin-of-life theories is how proteins became left-handed.  Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, come in right-handed and left-handed forms, yet life uses only the left-handed form.    The two isoforms are otherwise identical—yet one amino acid of the wrong hand in a protein spells doom for its function.  Wherever amino acids form naturally (as in Stanley Miller’s spark-discharge experiment), they form in roughly equal amounts of both hands (racemic mixture).  How could a natural system isolate and purify the mixture without the DNA code and ribosomes that ensure quality control in life?  One new suggestion printed in Science Daily was adorned with a picture of a ribosome and the suggestive title, “Meteorites Delivered The ‘Seeds’ Of Earth’s Left-hand Life.”  The first paragraph almost sounds like the beginning of a children’s story: Flash back three or four billion years — Earth is a hot, dry and lifeless place.  All is still.  Without warning, a meteor slams into the desert plains at over ten thousand miles per hour.  With it, this violent collision may have planted the chemical seeds of life on Earth.These “seeds” (amino acids) would have had a tough time without fertilizer landing in a desert of rock and sand, since fertilizer comes from living organisms.  Amino acids are not that hard to manufacture in natural conditions.  Only a large stretch of imagination could consider them to be seeds.  The story continues with the metaphor switching from farming to cooking.Scientists have presented evidence that desert heat, a little water, and meteorite impacts may have been enough to cook up one of the first prerequisites for life: The dominance of “left-handed” amino acids, the building blocks of life on this planet.The article reports on research by scientists from Columbia University and the American Chemical Society.  Till now, simulations of early-earth conditions and chemical models have only been able to produce a slight excess of one hand over the other (06/21/2004, 11/19/2004, 11/05/2004, 12/03/2004, 03/23/2005).  Another problem is keeping them one-handed (09/26/2002).  The scientists first proposed that meteorites accumulate a 5-10% excess of one hand from circularly polarized light from neutron stars.  Landing on earth, the excess becomes amplified through repeated episodes of wetting and drying.    Thus the desert: this would not work in an oceanic “primordial soup.”  The meteor has to deliver its goods on dry ground, then be close enough to the ocean to reach “a little bit of water.”  These are called “plausible prebiotic conditions.”  It is hard to believe, however, that sufficient quantities of amino acids could have been delivered to one location on a large planet.  Also, the wetting process tends to dissolve the polypeptides; they only crystallize during the drying period.  Even if a long chain of one-handed amino acids did crystallize, it would be the end of the line unless incorporated with RNA or DNA into a system.  In life, both depend on each other.    The press release is filled with optimism.  Ronald Breslow (Columbia) added humor to the imaginary scenario:“These meteorites were bringing in what I call the ‘seeds of chirality,’” stated Breslow.  “If you have a universe that was just the mirror image of the one we know about, then in fact, presumably it would have right-handed amino acids.  That’s why I’m only half kidding when I say there is a guy on the other side of the universe with his heart on the right hand side.”A check of the far side of the universe is not necessary.  Presumably Titan, Enceladus or Europa could have gotten its shipment in right-handed amino acids, since it is a matter of chance according to naturalistic theories.  That is why astrobiologists consider finding right-handed polypeptides a biomarker.    The goal is 100% purity of one hand over the other.  Living things enforce 100% purity through multiple quality-control mechanisms.  It was not clear from the article how much of an excess was actually achieved experimentally.  The report seemed to leap to the conclusion that amplification by wetting and drying cycles would achieve the necessary purity:Breslow found that the left and right-handed amino acids would bind together as they crystallized from water.  The left-right bound amino acids left the solution as water evaporated, leaving behind increasing amounts of the left-amino acid in solution.  Eventually, the amino acid in excess became ubiquitous as it was used selectively by living organisms.That last sentence, though, implies the existence of the DNA code and ribosomes.  How a pre-genetic system could tell the difference, or care, was left unexplained.This story is far-fetched to the extreme.  Anyone familiar with the problem must stand aghast at the leaps of faith required to believe in their fairy tale.  For a refresher on the severity of this problem, read our online book, chapter 3 and chapter 4.    They get away with it because their worldview requires it, and they have nothing else.  Dressing it up with humor and metaphor doesn’t distract the wise.    Shame on science reporters for portraying fairy tales as science.  Dave Mosher, who trashed the ID movie Expelled yesterday (see 04/07/2008), had no problem with the pseudoscience in this paper.  In fact, he even embellished it more in his LiveScience article that was syndicated to Yahoo.com and other news outlets: “Neutron starlight might have zapped amino acids riding on comets and asteroids into a bias, and a little water might have concentrated them after they crashed into Earth, a team of scientists now say.”  So Mr. Mosher thinks he knows science well enough to demonize all the PhDs in the movie Expelled, but cannot see the demons of irrationality and imagination channeling through evolution-worshiping scientists.    That’s why one of our readers, a retired engineer, called the guilty website “Sèance Daily” (also works for Live Sèance).  He wrote up a spoof that has more believable science in it than the article above:Meteorites Delivered The ‘Seeds’ Of Earth’s Chain Link Fences, Experts ArgueSèance Daily (Apr. 6, 2008): Flash back three or four billion years — Earth is a hot, dry and fence-less place.  All is still.  Without warning, a meteor slams into the desert plains at over ten thousand miles per hour.  With it, this violent collision may have planted the chemical seeds of chain-link fences on Earth.    Scientists have presented evidence that desert heat, a little hand waving, and meteorite impacts may have been enough to cook up one of the first prerequisites for aluminum fences: The dominance of “left-handed” aluminum atoms, the building blocks of chain-linked fences on this planet.    In a report at the 235th national meeting of the Atheist Apologist Society, Donald Slowbres, B.S., University Professor, Darwin University, and former AAS Official Watchmaker Debunker, described how aluminum fences came from outer space.    Chains of aluminum atoms make up the strands found in fences, various rods, and all cheap sets of pots and pans.  There are two orientations of aluminum atoms, left and right, which mirror each other in the same way your hands do.  This is known as “chirality.”  In order for chain-linked fences to arise, fences must contain only one chiral form of aluminum atoms, left or right, Slowbres noted.    “If you mix up chirality, a fence’s properties change enormously.  Chain-linked fences couldn’t operate with just random mixtures of stuff,” he said….    … Evidence of this left-handed excess was found on the surfaces of these meteorites, which have crashed into Earth even within the last hundred years, landing in Disney’s Fantasy Land Theme Park.    Slowbres simulated what occurred after the dust settled following a meteor bombardment, when the aluminum atoms on the meteor mixed with the primadona soup.  Under “credible pre-fencetic conditions”– desert-like temperatures and a little bit of random mutation — he exposed aluminum atom chemical precursors to those aluminum atoms found on meteorites.    Slowbres and Darwin chemistry grad student Quickdraw McDuck found that these cosmic aluminum atoms could directly transfer their chirality to simple aluminum atoms found in aluminum fences.  Thus far, Slowbres’s team is the first to demonstrate that this kind of handedness transfer is possible under these conditions.    On pre-fence Earth, this transfer left a slight excess of left-handed aluminum atoms, Slowbres said.  His next experiments with beer cans replicated the chemistry that led to the amplification and eventual dominance of left-handed aluminum atoms.    The steps afterward that led towards the genesis of chain-linked fences are shrouded in mystery.  Slowbres hopes to shine more light on pre-fence Earth as he turns his attention to iron atoms, the chemical units of the Eiffel Tower and its more primitive cousin, the Eiffel Fence.    “This work is related to the probability that there is chain-linked fences somewhere else,” said Slowbres.  “Everything that is going on on Earth occurred because the meteorites happened to land here.  But they are obviously landing in other places.  If there is another planet that has the cow pastures and all of the things that cows excrete, you should be able to get the same process rolling.”last_img read more

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Can “ag-gag” prevent secretly filming at livestock facilities?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Ellen Essman, Sr. Research Associate, Ohio State University Agricultural & Resource Law ProgramNationwide, it seems as though “ag-gag” laws are being challenged and overturned left and right. “Ag-gag” is the term for laws that prevent undercover journalists, investigators, animal rights advocates, and other whistleblowers from secretly filming or recording at livestock facilities. “Ag-gag” also describes laws which make it illegal for undercover persons to use deception to obtain employment at livestock facilities. Many times, the laws were actually passed in response to under-cover investigations which illuminated conditions for animals raised at large industrial farms. Some of the videos and reports produced were questionable in nature — they either set-up the employees and the farms, or they were released without a broader context of farm operations. The laws were meant to protect the livestock industry from reporting that might be critical of their operations — obtained through deception and without context, or otherwise.Here in Ohio, we do not have an ag-gag law; instead we have the Ohio Livestock Care Standards, which are rules for the care of livestock in the state. The rules are made by the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board, which is made up of farmers, food safety experts, farmers’ organizations, veterinarians, the dean of the agriculture department from an Ohio college or university, consumers, and county humane society representatives. There are standards for the care of different species of livestock, as well as standards for euthanizing livestock, feeding and watering livestock, transporting livestock, etc. Violating the standards could lead to civil penalties. Part of the thinking behind the Livestock Care Standards was that by bringing together farmers, veterinarians, and animal welfare representatives, among others, all sides would be represented, and therefore ag-gag laws and deceptive reporting could be avoided. The laws regarding the Ohio Livestock Care Standards can be found here, and the regulations here. Kansas law challengedOn December 4, 2018, the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF), along with other animal and food safety organizations, filed a complaint against the state of Kansas, arguing that the state’s ag-gag law is unconstitutional on freedom of speech grounds.Kansas’ ag-gag law can be found in the Kansas Statutes, sections 47-1826, 47-1827, 47-1828 and 21-6604. The law, among other things, makes it illegal, “without the effective consent of the owner,” to “enter an animal facility to take pictures by photograph, video camera or by any other means” with the “intent to damage the animal facility.” The law also makes it illegal for someone to conceal themselves in order to record conditions or to damage the facility. “Effective consent” cannot be obtained by “force, fraud, deception, duress, or threat,” meaning it is not permissible for an undercover whistleblower to apply for a job at an animal facility and work at the facility if they really intend to record and disseminate the conditions.ALDF and their fellow plaintiffs argue that the Kansas ag-gag law violates the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech. The plaintiffs argue that purpose of the Kansas law is to suppress certain kinds of political speech, namely the speech of animal rights activists and food safety organizations “because of their viewpoint and the content of their messages.” The plaintiffs assert that “[t]he law ensures only [the livestock] industry’s side of the debate” is heard. Furthermore, the plaintiffs argue that the Kansas law is overbroad in its attempt to limit freedom of speech, “prohibiti[ng] substantially more speech than the First Amendment permits.” The Kansas lawsuit is very similar to one in Iowa, where the judge recently overturned the state’s ag-gag statute. Iowa law overturnedOn January 9, 2019, James E. Gritzner, a U.S. District Court judge in the Southern District of Iowa found Iowa’s ag-gag law to be unconstitutional on First Amendment grounds. Like the complaint in Kansas, this lawsuit was initiated by ALDF and other groups against the state of Iowa. Gritzner’s decision is available here.Iowa’s law, which, as of this writing is still available here, makes it a crime to “[o]btain[] access to an agricultural production facility by false pretenses,” and/or “[m]ake[] a false statement or representation as part of an application or agreement to be employed at an agricultural production facility, if the person knows the statement to be false, and makes the statement with an intent to commit an act not authorized by the owner of the agricultural production facility, knowing that the act is not authorized.”Much like the Kansas lawsuit discussed above, the plaintiffs in this case argued that Iowa’s law was content-based, viewpoint-based, and overbroad, and thus violated the First Amendment right to free speech. Judge Gritzner agreed.Judge Gritzner used precedent to explain that “a free speech challenge proceeds in three stages. First, the Court resolves whether the challenged statute implicates protected speech. If it does, the Court determines which level of scrutiny applies. Then, the Court applies the appropriate scrutiny and confirms whether the statute satisfies the applicable standard.”In this case, Gritzner found that the speech being implicated, “false statements and misrepresentations,” was protected speech, citing the Supreme Court to make his point: “one of the costs of the First Amendment is that it protects the speech we detest as well as the speech we embrace.” In other words, even though the protected speech in this case consists of false statements, such speech is still protected under certain circumstances.Secondly, Judge Gritzner weighed in on the issue of scrutiny. Here, it was a question of whether to apply strict scrutiny, which the plaintiffs argued should apply, or intermediate scrutiny, which the defendants favored. Strict scrutiny requires that the challenged law deals with a compelling state interest, and that the law is narrowly tailored to accomplish that interest. Intermediate scrutiny is a step down from strict scrutiny; it requires the law to serve an important government objective, and to be substantially related to realizing that objective. Gritzner reasoned that it didn’t matter which level of scrutiny applied, because the Iowa law did not pass either one of the scrutiny tests.Finally, Gritzner explained why the Iowa statute did not satisfy either scrutiny standard. Here, the state of Iowa argued that the law was meant to protect the “state’s interests of private property and biosecurity.” Judge Gritzner noted that private property and biosecurity were not the only reasons for the statute—at least one state senator had been quoted as saying that the bill was meant to stop groups from giving “the agriculture industry a bad name.” In addition, Gritzner reasoned that these interests were not “compelling,” pointing to case law that found similar interests—protection to animals, people, and property—did not fall under the “compelling” category. Furthermore, Gritzner found that the statute was not “narrowly tailored,” because the language was not “actually necessary to protect perceived harms to property and biosecurity.” In other words, Gritzner thought it was a stretch to believe that someone giving a false statement or misrepresentation in order to access or become employed by an agricultural production facility is really related to property damage or biological harm. Gritzner also pointed out that Iowa has protected against such harms elsewhere in its statutes in “content neutral” language that does not affect freedom of speech. The judge did not spend much time discussing intermediate scrutiny, instead he explained that the Iowa law is simply too broad, harm is unlikely, and the need to prohibit the lies is small, which can be interpreted to mean that the law does not serve an important government objective. Future not looking good for ag-gag lawsSeveral other states — including Idaho, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Utah, have passed ag-gag laws similar to the laws in Kansas and Iowa. However, the laws have also been overturned in several states. In January 2018, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals determined most of Idaho’s ag-gag law violated the First Amendment. A federal district court in Utah also struck down Utah’s ag-gag law for violating freedom of speech. A similar lawsuit against a North Carolina law is also in progress. The North Carolina lawsuit will be an interesting one to watch since the statute applies to other property owners, not just those involved in agriculture. Time will tell whether the remaining state ag-gag laws meet constitutional muster.last_img read more

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Why I Started Exercising First Every Day

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now For five years, I wrote a blog post every morning at 5:00 AM. On the weekends I might have slept in until 7:00 AM, but the first thing I did upon waking was grabbing a cup of coffee, sitting down at my desk, and start writing the daily blog.Waking up at 5:00 AM to write was what allowed me to be consistent. It allowed me to invest time in writing and developing my social presence without having to give up anything else. Well, almost anything else. I did have to give up the time I spent exercising.A few months ago I decided that writing this blog was not my very highest priority. In fact, writing a blog post first each day was working against my highest priority. My highest value is freedom. And I need the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health to pursue that goal. So I decided to make a change.Now, seven days a week, the first thing I do each day is drive to the small gym run by my personal trainer to lift weights and do bodyweight exercises. My personal trainer believes in a core routine of deadlifts, clean and press, squats, and push and pull motions. He also loves intense bodyweight exercises, like push ups and pull-ups (which exposes your exceedingly limited upper body strength better than any other exercise).I don’t do physical labor in any of my work roles (unless you consider typing physical labor). I am what Peter Drucker described as a “knowledge worker.” But my body is the vessel in which my brain and mind live, and it is critical that I keep that environment in impeccably good health.Your physical health is the foundation of every other result you produce. By putting my health and fitness first, I ensure that it gets done before the rest of my work day crowds out the time and the energy I need. You make that expended energy you are using energy, but you are creating energy.Whatever your priorities are, you are going to achieve them faster and more certainly if you take care of your health first. This is why I started exercising first every morning.last_img read more

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Hero in defeat: Vijender ignored extreme pain to fight for India in boxing quarter-finals

first_imgWhen I met Viju (that’s what Vijender is called fondly) the day after his quarter-final bout, I noticed there was something different about him. I had not seen Viju like this in years — more precisely in the last three years.Vijender was acting brave; trying to show the world that he was fine. “It happens in sport one day… you lose, and the next day you bounce back,” he told the waiting mediapersons.But Viju knows me for a long time and treats me bit like a friend, and as soon as we moved away from the group of journalists, out came the truth. “Bhaishahab, duniya ko kya malum hum kitna pain lekar khelte hai hum (the world has no idea of how much pain we suffer while playing),” said the rugged boxer with tears in his eyes.Then, Viju lifted his shirt and I was shocked beyond words! The skin on the right side of his chest — from the top of the rib cage till the waist — was completely infected. The entire area was red with blisters all over, somewhat similar to chicken pox. The champion said he had been suffering from the infection for the last few days, and it was really painful.I asked him whether he had been taking any medicines. “I can’t take storng drugs because of doping regulations and these infections anyway take their own time to heal,” Vijender replied with a smile as he pulled his shirt down.”Kya kya dard lekar khelte hai (we endure so much pain while we play),” he said, adding that his back gave way in the middle of the quarter-final bout and forced him onto the backfoot. I could also see that he had been left with one blue eye after the bout.advertisementSo, anyone who thought that Vijender didn’t give his best in the ring against Abbos Atoev, I want you all to know that Vijender is not a loser; he is a brave fighter that we should all be proud of.”I will come back in Rio (2016 Olympics). I’m just 26,” Viju has assured us all.Good luck, fighter!last_img read more

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SPORT-SALMAN-LD REAX 3 LAST

first_imgHowever, Sardar and Mary Kom felt that the Bollywood However, Sardar and Mary Kom felt that the Bollywood celebritys mass appeal will help raise awareness about Olympic sports ahead of the Games in Rio de Janeiro in August. “Salman has a huge fan base. He has good views on sports and its a good thing for Indian sports that he has come on board. A lot of people are getting connected to Olympic sports because of him. (But) People are entitled to their views. I respect their opinion,” Sardar said. “It hasnt happened before, its a good thing for the athletes. Its good for us to have a brand ambassador like him,” opined Mary Kom, a bronze-medallist from the 2012 London Olympics. Indias first and only individual Olympic gold-medallist shooter Abhinav Bindra also backed the IOAs decision. “Dear @BeingSalmanKhan, am sure you will use your tremendous goodwill to help Indian Olympic Sport and Olympic athletes in their pursuit towards excellence. “Congratulations on being appointed ambassador of the Indian Olympic Team! An absolute honour which comes with great responsibility!” the ace marksman said in a series of tweets. Commonwealth Games gold-medallist discus thrower Krishna Poonia said although an athlete would have been a better choice, Salmans popularity is undeniable. “There is no dearth of athletes in our country. There is P T Usha, Sachin Tendulkar, so many who have done us proud. The public, however, loves filmstars and probably it was thought that it would help popularise Olympic sports. I wish all the luck in his new role,” Poonia said. PTI PM PMadvertisementlast_img read more

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In The Spotlight – Anthony Ziade

first_imgIn the eleventh edition of In The Spotlight, Australian Men’s Open player, Anthony Ziade, speaks about how he got involved in Touch Football and the biggest influences on his Touch Football career.  Name: Anthony ZiadeNickname: ZeeAge: 31Affiliate: Western Suburbs MagpiesOccupation: BuilderPosition: LinkDebut for Australia: 2000 Under 20’s, 2004 Men’s Open. Career highlights so far: Winning 2007 World Cup, 2010 Trans Tasman, winning the Vawdon Cup and State Cup double for Wests in 2005.How you got involved in Touch Football: My two older sisters played for Wests. My school teacher, Steve Murphy, who was a current Australian Men’s Open player got me involved in the sport.Favourite player: Garry SondaWhat does it mean to you to be representing Australia at the 2011 World Cup: I’m excited to play with my good mate Jamie Stowe and to be coached by my club coaches Paul Sfeir and Tony Trad at the top level.Biggest influence on your Touch Football career: Tony Trad – not only a mentor but a great friend.Favourite sporting moment: Kostya Tszyu knocking out Zab Judah.What do you know about Scotland: No underpants, kilts, haggis and William Wallace.Any superstitions: Same seat on the team bus to and from games.Funniest Australian teammate: Jamie Stowe.Favourite quote: This is a quote from my good mate Paul Sfeir – “It’s better than a sliced breakfast.”Any travel plans for after World Cup: YesStay tuned to the website for the upcoming editions of In The Spotlight, which will feature every Open’s player travelling to the World Cup. With only 43 days to go until the 2011 Federation of International Touch World Cup, be sure to be regularly visiting the Touch Football Australia website to keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information. Don’t forget to become a fan of Touch Football Australia on Facebook and Twitter in the lead up to the 2011 World Cup to find out all you need to know about Australia’s World Cup campaign:http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Touch-Football-Australia/384949403384 www.twitter.com/touchfootyauslast_img read more

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a month agoValverde: Granada a test of Barcelona credentials

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Valverde: Granada a test of Barcelona credentialsby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona coach Ernesto Valverde expects a big test of their credentials at Granada.Barcelona have failed to win either of their opening two LaLiga Santander games on the road, first losing to Athletic Club (1-0) before drawing with Osasuna (2-2).That was followed up by a 0-0 draw at Borussia Dortmund in the Champions League in midweek and Valverde feels that all has to change.”Away from home we are not getting good results, it is costing us,” Valverde said during his press conference.”The [Osasuna] game in Pamplona, which we turned around, we were not able to win. We have to change that dynamic.”These kind of grounds can determine the championship because it is where you cannot slip.” last_img read more

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New $30.3m Irrigation System Commissioned in New Forrest-duff House

first_img A total of 400 farmers who cultivate in the New Forest-Duff House Agro Park in Manchester now have improved irrigation access following the commissioning of a new $30.3 million industrial pump that will serve the area, on June 29.The facility was jointly funded by the World Bank, through its Rural Economic Development Initiative (REDI) being implemented by the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF), and the National Irrigation Commission (NIC), which contributed $9 million of the cost.Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister, Hon. Karl Samuda, thanked the stakeholder entities for assisting to facilitate improved irrigation for the farmers.In a message read by Permanent Secretary, Donovan Stanberry, Mr. Samuda emphasized the importance of ensuring that farmers have adequate supplies of water. This, he said, in order to ensure that the agricultural sector is in a position to contribute meaningfully to economic growth.“Without water we cannot hope to grow the agricultural sector in a meaningful and sustainable way. So, the commissioning of this pump and irrigation system will ensure that farmers in the area have greater access to a consistent supply of water,” Mr. Samuda added.Meanwhile, Minster without Portfolio, Hon. J.C. Hutchinson, also welcomed the new facility’s commissioning, noting that South Manchester/South St Elizabeth region was a traditionally dry area.In this regard, he said the new facility would contribute to increasing the volume of production 10-fold by bringing irrigation to the beneficiaries.Noting that another facility serving the area supplies 50 percent of the water utilized, Mr. Hutchinson pointed out that “with this new pump, (this) will increase the volume to 75 percent. The 400 farmers will now be able to get water more regularly and we (will be) able to provide additional farmers, who need it, with water.”Mr. Hutchinson also restated the availability of approximately 5,000 acres of arable land in sections of South Manchester which he said the Government would be allocating to farmers who need it.He, however, noted the reluctance of farmers to cultivate on the land because of limited irrigation access and expressed the hope that this would be rectified soon.“We also have coming on stream the Essex Valley Agricultural Development Project which will cost roughly $5.7 billion, allowing farmers who are unable to get production going to generate the sort of profits that they want to make,” Mr. Hutchinson added.Managing Director of JSIF, Omar Sweeney, who also spoke at the commissioning, said through the partnership, the NIC was now in a position to properly plan and distribute water to meet the farmers’ needs.“The partnership between NIC and JSIF is really about the value that we can get out of the area in terms of production,” he emphasized. Story Highlights Managing Director of JSIF, Omar Sweeney, who also spoke at the commissioning, said through the partnership, the NIC was now in a position to properly plan and distribute water to meet the farmers’ needs. A total of 400 farmers who cultivate in the New Forest-Duff House Agro Park in Manchester now have improved irrigation access following the commissioning of a new $30.3 million industrial pump that will serve the area, on June 29. Noting that another facility serving the area supplies 50 percent of the water utilized, Mr. Hutchinson pointed out that “with this new pump, (this) will increase the volume to 75 percent. The 400 farmers will now be able to get water more regularly and we (will be) able to provide additional farmers, who need it, with water.”last_img read more

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Ohio State womens ice hockey sweeps opening series against New Hampshire

OSU freshman goaltender Kassidy Sauve (32) watches as sophomore defenseman Alexa Ranahan (21) pushes the puck up the ice in a game against New Hampshire Oct. 4. at the Ohio State Ice Rink. OSU won 4-3.Credit: Melissa Prax / Lantern photographerThe Ohio State women’s hockey team knew it needed a good start to the season, but getting a good scare wasn’t in the original plans.Following a 1-0 win against New Hampshire on Friday, the Buckeyes completed their home series sweep against the Wildcats with a 4-3 late-game victory Saturday.OSU sophomore forward Claudia Kepler’s goal with 32 seconds remaining in Saturday’s game saved the Buckeyes (2-0-0) from a collapse that saw their early 3-0 lead erased.“We’re really a cohesive unit that’s working well together right now and you can feel the energy in the locker room and while we’re on the bench,” senior forward Kayla Sullivan said. “We’re comfortable working with each other already.”Fresh off a shutout victory on Friday night, OSU jumped out to a quick start on Saturday but was unable to hold its advantage.First period goals by senior forward Danielle Gagne, Sullivan and sophomore defenseman Alexa Ranahan were answered in the second and third periods when the Wildcats recorded three-consecutive tallies.“I think that we started gambling a little bit and getting away from playing some fundamentally-sound hockey,” OSU coach Nate Handrahan said. “That can’t happen as we go forward.”Kepler’s goal in the waning seconds of Saturday’s game marked her second game-winning goal in as many days.Friday’s game wasn’t nearly as hectic, but still challenged the Buckeyes. Once Kepler’s second-period goal gave OSU a 1-0 lead, the team was forced to defend its advantage the rest of the game.The Buckeye defense faced its biggest test when Gagne took an interference penalty with 3:07 remaining in regulation. OSU’s penalty kill was perfect in the game, as it was on Saturday as well.As a whole, OSU’s special teams success was limited to the penalty kill. The Buckeyes went zero-for-seven on the power play during the series and struggled to find structure with the man advantage.The power play is a work in progress, Handrahan said.OSU allowed a shorthanded goal on Saturday, an occurrence that happened six times last season.In net, the Buckeyes were backstopped  by freshman goalie Kassidy Sauve who picked up a shutout in her first collegiate start. Sauve combined to make 46 saves on 49 shots on the weekend.“Knowing that we have her behind us it gives us the confidence to play more aggressive and maybe a little riskier,” redshirt-sophomore defenseman Bryanna Neuwald said. “It’s comforting.”Next to Sauve, freshman forward Julianna Iafallo was the Buckeyes’ most notable rookie. Iafallo was a top-six forward and had four shots during the series.“I think our freshmen in general are a little bit tentative,” Handrahan said “They’re dipping their toe in the water when I need them to do a cannon ball and get in the pool.”Five freshmen made their Buckeye debuts against New Hampshire.OSU is now undefeated in its last five season openers.The Buckeyes are scheduled to play at Wisconsin on Friday at 8:07 p.m. and Sunday at 2:07 p.m. read more

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