Seeing Harvard from all sides

first_imgBill Lee has seen Harvard from many vantage points: He attended the College, has taught at the Law School, served as an Overseer and has been a proud Harvard parent – twice. As he prepared to join the Corporation, Lee, co-managing partner of the law firm WilmerHale, sat down with the Gazette to share his perspective on an institution that has been part of his life for four decades.Gazette: Do you have a memory that crystallizes your experience as a Harvard undergrad?Lee: I do.  I came from a small public high school.  My parents were immigrants from China.  My dad had a Ph.D. in physics, but he was nevertheless an immigrant from China.  And I was the first person from my high school ever to get in and come to Harvard.  I arrived and I thought, I have to be a mistake. There are all these smart, talented people.  I’m just not quite sure what I’m doing here. Years later, when I was elected to the Board of Overseers and I arrived at my first meeting, I looked around the room at this phenomenally talented group of people and thought, oh my God, it’s happening again! What am I doing here?There’s another story, too. The day that my dad dropped me off at Harvard, he helped me move my belongings into Pennypacker and then we took a walk down Mass Ave. He said to me, “so you’re going to be scientist.”  And I said, “I am. I’m going to be an engineer, just like you.”  We walked two or three more steps, and he said, “Well, if you’re going to be a scientist, you need to be a deep thinker.”  I said, “Yeah.”  We walked two or three more steps, and we stopped right across from the Hong Kong restaurant. My father looked me right in the eyes and said, “Well, you’re not.  Change your major, do something different.  It will work out.”  And then he got in his car and he left! I changed my major.Both of my brothers are professors at the Medical School. Both of them are younger, and both of them majored in science.  They obviously didn’t get the same talk!Gazette: How did you see the University when you returned as a visiting professor at the Law School?Lee: I had a very different perspective. I didn’t go to Harvard Law School, so being able to teach at Harvard Law School was just a wonderful opportunity, and an intimidating opportunity.  The faculty was very welcoming, and the kids were just so smart.  They were just so smart.  The course that we just finished teaching was an extraordinary experience. It was designed to address the question: What is a law school education missing? And Dean Kagan and Dean Minow decided that law school was missing the type of education that taught you judgment, leadership, relationship building, and teamwork, and we designed a course based upon business school-type case studies that are focused on legal issues. I actually helped design one about two and a half years ago.  It was great for several reasons: We were doing something that was wholly different for law schools, a wholly different type of education. The class I taught had to do everything in teams of 16 students. They did reports in teams, they had to write in teams, they had to do their analysis in teams.  It’s very common across the river, but not very common up at the Law School.  It was also great because, in a very nontraditional way, the seven of us who were teaching the case to different groups met every day and talked about what worked, what didn’t work, what we would try, what we didn’t try.  It’s just a great experience.Gazette: How did your Harvard experiences inform your work on the Board of Overseers?Lee: By the time I joined the Board of Overseers, I had been educated about Harvard in a couple different ways. I had been at the College for four years, and what I learned with the passage of time is that the most extraordinary part of the Harvard experience is your contemporaries. Two or three decades after you graduate, when you examine your relationship with your contemporaries, it is really more than you could have imagined at the age of 18 or 19. I’ll give you an example: Our firm is a merged firm between Wilmer Cutler & Pickering [based in Washington] and Hale and Dorr [based in Boston].  Part of the reason that merger was successful is that my college classmate, [former Deputy Attorney General and former Harvard Overseer] Jamie Gorelick, and [former Solicitor General and current Harvard Overseer] Seth Waxman, who was a year behind me, were at Wilmer.  So when we decided to explore the possibility of a merger, I was sitting down talking to people I’d known since I was 18 or 19. That crystallized one of the great advantages Harvard has, which is it just attracts the most innovative, creative, dynamic people.I also had the benefit of being around Boston, and being part of a law firm that has a large number of Harvard people. I had the experience of teaching.  And then I had the best experience – I had been a parent. That just allowed me to see things from a whole variety of different perspectives – student, parent of student, faculty member, basically the consumer of what Harvard produces, the beneficiary of everything that Harvard can deliver.Gazette: The University is emerging from a particularly challenging stretch. From your point of view, how have President Faust and the University handled this period, and how do you think things are lining up for the future?Lee: I was on the search committee that selected President Faust. From the time I first met her in that process, I’ve been extraordinarily impressed with the type of leadership she brings, her personality, her vision, and her ability to get things done.  She came into office during a time of some turmoil in the community. She did a pretty unbelievable job of taking her very calm, very thorough manner of addressing issues, and actually imposing that personality on the University.  It was a change that I think was a wonderful example of great leadership.  Now, I don’t know of any Civil War historian who thought that they were going to have to understand interest rate swaps.  But having done a wonderful job of restoring calm and confidence, she moved into another tumultuous time, and I think has done a very good job of moving us through that process.One of the challenges at Harvard is, it’s a paradox.  It’s the most creative, innovative place in the world.  Yet, it probably has more inertia than any place in the world. Part of the task is taking that institution, which is known for innovation and creativity, and then moving it forward and overcoming the inertia.  That requires incremental steps, one by one.  As I read her message to the community at the beginning of this school year, it said we’re coming into a different time, which we are.  It’s going to require that we set priorities, which we will have to.  And it’s going to require everybody to pull together and share both the rewards and the sacrifice of achieving those priorities.  And I think that everybody will.Gazette: One of the aspects of the Harvard experience that President Faust has been emphasizing is the commitment to public service. You were part of Lawrence Walsh’s team during the Iran-Contra investigation. You’ve done a lot of work advising the federal courts.  Does your experience give you a sense of how Harvard’s mission intersects with public service?Lee: I don’t know if you’ve heard David Gergen speak about my generation’s failure of leadership in the public arena. He does it sort of mournfully, because we’re the generation that went to college during the Vietnam era, and in some ways we should have been the generation that was most motivated.  He talks a great deal about, as a consequence, how it’s critically important for institutions like Harvard to instill that public service commitment and mentality in the next generation. I agree with him 100%, and I agree that it’s a big part of what Harvard has to do.Harvard not only has an obligation to train people in the arena; it also needs to help fight the economic and institutional barriers that block people who want to go in that direction. And it has to help reinforce the proposition that public service is a great thing, and it’s really terrifically rewarding.  I think Harvard is one of a few universities that has the ability to make a critically important difference.Gazette: You are known as one of the top intellectual property litigators in the country. I always think that someone who rises to the top of their field must really love what they do…Lee: Yeah.Gazette: So what is it that you love best about your work?Lee: Well, you have to have in mind my father’s story about my technical background. He always thought it was a riot that this is what I was doing! I’ll go from the narrow to the broad: I like trial work.  I’ve probably done 200 trials in my lifetime.  I’ve argued 100 appeals. I love the crucible of a trial, and I love cross-examination in particular. This area of law has allowed me to really be involved in cases that are at the cutting edge of commerce and technology. It’s allowed me to be in a very intellectually interesting area.  And the field attracts interesting folks, and that’s been a great part of it as well.Gazette: What do you do when you’re not in the office?  Do you sail? Do you play soccer?Lee: I used to play soccer until I was 50, and I got clobbered at it! I played over-30 soccer for years. I was playing in a game and someone beat our sweeper back.  I was a midfielder.  I beat the striker to the ball, and instead of just carrying the ball out, I got cute.  I stepped over it and I flicked it with my heel. The other guy didn’t expect it.  He ran me over.  I fell down, he fell – his knee hit me and fractured four of my ribs, and one of them broke in half and went through the side of my lung. I ended up at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital for a week, and my wife said, “No more.”Now I run a lot.  I’m an avid runner, 25 or 35 miles a week.  I’ve run the Marathon once.  Now and again, I get to sneak out and play for the firm’s coed soccer team, which is fun.  I’m a fan of the Harvard men’s soccer team, which was really great this year.  On Saturdays and Sundays in the fall, I go out to watch the games.  I still follow the Harvard women’s swimming team because my daughter Catie was the captain of the team.  Most of the rest of the time is devoted to my family.  We’re very fortunate, we’re all still here. There are eight grandchildren; they’re all pretty much around here.  We’re all very close.For the last 15 years or so, the combination of practicing law, being the managing partner here, having us grow into the firm we’ve become, and doing what I’ve done over at the Law School is – it’s been about as much as I want to do.Gazette: I can imagine.Lee: But it’s been great.  It’s great.Gazette: What do you want the Harvard community to know about how you’ll approach your new responsibilities on the Corporation?Lee: Remember what I said about when I first arrived at Harvard? I have sort of the same humble reaction as I approach this position.  It’s interesting and enticing to come in at a challenging time, because in some sense, in a challenging time you can contribute more.  I think that the president is a great president, with not only a vision of where she wants the University to go, but an understanding of the incremental steps that have to be taken to get there.  I’m just hoping I can help.last_img read more

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Bank statement on lending arrives two years too late

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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It will take a `superhuman’ effort to lift Berbice cricket – Foster

first_imgPOPULAR cricket administrator Hilbert Foster yesterday weighed in on the numerous calls whether he should run as a presidential candidate in the upcoming election reserved for the Berbice Cricket Board (BCB), which is scheduled for October 8.The Annual General Meeting (AGM) and elections of the BCB was made possible by a ruling delivered by Justice Navindra Singh last September 8, with the purpose of electing officer-bearers of the board.But Foster said yesterday that he is still mulling over whether to run for the top post since it will take a superhuman effort to lift Berbice cricket.“I am still considering whether to run,” Foster said.He added, “Berbice cricket at such a low level, it will take a superhuman effort to lift it up, but once I consider and win, and with the right team, a turnaround can happen in six months”.Just recently at the Rose Hall Town Youth and Sports Club’s 27th annual awards ceremony, Foster had pointed out that Berbice cricket is in disarray due to the lust for power, both at the county and national levels.Foster, who is the CEO of Guyana’s leading sports club, had also mentioned that Berbice cricket is run by people who have no vision, no capacity to manage and are in charge, despite not being elected to do so.To this end, and with the elections for office-bearers now looming, former West Indies cricketers Ramnaresh Sarwan and Mahendra Nagamootoo as well as Region Six Chairman David Armogan, have thrown their support behind Foster, saying Foster should be the preferred presidential candidate.Those endorsements are just a few, according to Foster, who said he’s heartened by the overwhelming support from clubs, associations, cricketers, local leaders, business entities, as well as a number of politicians.Anil BeharryMeanwhile, should Foster confirm his running, and should he become the BCB president, cricket in abundance at all levels will be his main priority.“My main aim is to host 20 tournaments every year from the Under-13 level right up to senior … over 100 off-field activities under different sub heads will be in the pipe line. Also I will ensure that each cricket club in Berbice has cricket on a regular basis so that our cricketers can benefit,” Foster concluded.The elections will be the first since 2014. The BCB was thrown into turmoil a few months after the December 2014 elections, after applicants Godwyn Allicock of the Port Mourant Cricket Club and David Black of the West Berbice Cricket Association sought and were granted a court injunction against the BCB which significantly limited the work of the-then Anil Beharry-led administration.However, after the BCB one-year term expired in December 2015, according to what is stipulated in the Cricket Administration Bill, Beharry resigned from the post in January of this year.Elected vice-president Dhieranidranauth Somwaru is performing duties as acting president, since he had informed Chronicle Sport in a subsequent interview that the injunction against the BCB was subsequently withdrawn. … BCB top post still under considerationlast_img read more

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What’s Next for BYC?

first_imgFlashback: (L-R) players Prince Jetho, David Tweh, skipper Van-Dave Harmon and Prince Saydee walk off the pitch after their goalless draw against Monrovia Club Breweries-After exiting the Knockout CupIt was another frustrating scene for players, staff and supporters of champion club Barrack Young Controllers (BYC) at the Antoinette Tubman Stadium after they were sent out of the Knockout Cup by rivals FC Fassel in a 4-2 penalty shootout on Wednesday.The Go Blue Boys’ exit marked their third elimination from three major competitions, including the CAF Champions League, CAF Confederation Cup and now the Knockout Cup.As it was in those previous crucial matches where Coach Cooper Sannah and his boys failed to utilize opportunities to advance to their next level, the Go Blue Boys had several opportunities to advance to round-2 of the Knockout Cup and to also bring back smiles on the faces of their supporters, but they failed to utilize their chances.Similar to the previous meeting between the two sides when BYC took the lead at the Blue Field, they also repeated the same after striker Mark Paye netted his goal in the 14th minute.But Fassel through skillful forward Trance Tisdell kept left-back James Kpote busy down the right flank and created lots of chances, which did not get the needed result in the 40th minute when he excellently drove through the right side of BYC’s defense to find teammate James Walatee who got the deserving equalizer for the Soccer Missionaries.Later after 52 minutes of play, defensive midfielder Gideon Williams put BYC back in the lead after first goal scorer Paye provided the assist for the midfielder to register his name on the score sheet.A minute after the goal, the Soccer Missionaries (FC Fassel) were reduced to ten men after forward Tisdell was sent off for elbowing midfielder Williams, but the red card did not slow down Coach Sam Chebli’s boys as they kept mounting pressure with substitute Abraham Barshell’s strike hitting the crossbar.Coach Chebli’s boys got the equalizer in the added minutes of the second half after substitute Elijah Clarke got the long awaited equalizer to send the match to post-match penalties, where BYC were defeated 4-2. Defender Prince Kennedy and goalkeeper Allenton Sembeh missed from the spot.The Go Blue Boys, having been booted out of another competition and currently in the fourth position on the league table, have shown that their only hope is the championship.Coach Sannah’s side now have Nimba United and FC Fassel, who defeated them twice, and top spots hunters Keitrace, Watanga, Mighty Barrolle, ELWA United, Jubilee and LPRC Oilers as their remaining opponents.With these remaining fixtures for Coach Cooper Sannah and his boys, and seven points behind the league leaders, what is next for BYC?Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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WEF raises South Africa’s global competitiveness ranking

first_imgSouth Africa has risen two places, to 47th, in the 2016 World Economic Forum Global Competitive Index, improving its ranking in 10 of the 12 pillars measured. The country has the most competitive economy on the African continent.The newly released World Economic Forum Global Competitive Index ranks South Africa as the 47th most completive economy of the 138 studied. The improvement in the rankings, the best in five years, comes as the country has improved both the competitiveness of our markets and relationships between labour and business, made modest, but important, progress in the quality of education, which is up five places from 2015.One reason for South Africa’s rise in the annual appraisal of prosperity and productivity is, according to the report, our ability to withstand the fall in price of commodities. Unlike African neighbours and other developing economies, South Africa has also built on the strength of its financial sector, which shielded the country from the worst effects of the global economic crisis.South Africa is ranked first out of 138 countries for auditing standards, the protection of minority investors and ability to finance through equity markets. The country is second or third for soundness of banks and financial services, efficacy of boards and regulation of the stock exchange.Robert Crotti, a WEF economist, explained to the Biznews website: “What we noticed is that to make a country really competitive, you need to have all the pieces in place. To rank number one in one specific dimension without having the other factors also well-placed, doesn’t really bring the country to grow and reach the prosperity where we see. In fact, when we look at the top countries in ranking, they tend to rank quite high on all the dimensions.”The report highlighted the biggest future challenges for our economy. “Infrastructure development has stalled, both in transport and electricity, with power shortages experienced this year. Institutional quality has diminished, with increased political uncertainty, less transparency, some security concerns, and business leaders having less trust in politicians (down 11 places since last year).”Crotti said the GCI is not meant as a criticism of each economy studied. For WEF it is a way to benchmark progress. “Therefore, we hope that it can be used as a platform for all the actors in the economy in looking at how and what worked, to then take the next steps to improve their economy.”South Africa’s growth forecast for 2016 is now set at 0.1%. Outside factors, slowdown of the Chinese economy and the volatility of the rand have dampened the potential for stronger growth. Where developed economies are accepting a “new normal” of lower economic growth, lower productivity growth, and high unemployment, South Africa and other developing economies have an opportunity to grow by improving productivity.Despite China’s slowdown it is the best-placed Brics nation, at 28, followed by India, Russia and South Africa. Brazil lags behind its Brics peers at 81. As Crotti explained, “India is really the bright spark in the area of competitiveness improvements and this is done mainly on the back of reforms, especially in terms of investment and market efficiency.”Crotti said India, more than any other country, should be the example South Africa follows to move further up the rankings. The Indian government has improved market and labour efficiencies, and stabilised government policy and the macroeconomic sector. As important, its government has improved the country’s technological readiness.”That’s really important to be able to jump-start the economy and as we’ve seen, also be able to gain innovation,” Crotti said. “To learn much more about technology and innovation. At the dawn of this Fourth Industrial Revolution it is really going to be key going forward.”South Africa.info reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

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Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast September 19, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The forecast pattern continues to just roll along with minimal changes. We have only 2 threats of rain in the next 10 days, and both threats do not look overly dramatic. Temperatures remain above normal for the rest of this week, and cool back to near normal for next week. Here are the details.Mostly sunny and warm today through Sunday. Clouds will be increasing Sunday afternoon, but we still end up with a pretty nice day. We have no rain in the forecast until Monday. On Monday we have to deal with scattered showers and a few thunderstorms that bring rain potential of .1″-1.1″ with coverage at 90% of Ohio. However, most of the rain totals will be between a tenth and half an inch. The 1 inch totals will be very limited across central Ohio where we may actually see some thunderstorm action around midday on Monday. Everything should be done by late Monday evening.Partly sunny, dry and cooler for Tuesday and Wednesday behind the frontal boundary. However, cooler is a relative term, as we still are going to be near normal. Scattered showers are back Wednesday night late into early Thursday…mostly between midnight and noon. Rain totals will be a few hundredths to .4″ max with coverage at 70% of Ohio.We are partly to mostly sunny and drier again to finish the week Thursday afternoon through next Saturday.10 day rain potentialThe extended period has showers for Sunday the 29th, and then we move into an unsettled period for Monday the 30th through Wednesday the 2nd. We cant rule out showers any of those days,but don’t think we see very many Monday and Tuesday. On Wednesday we can pick up a few scattered showers, but coverage still looks minor. Dry to finish out the extended period for Thursday the 3rd and Friday the 4th.last_img read more

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Geocaching.com Presents: Cachers of Steel

first_imgCachers of Steel: Cachin’s the Fashion[vsw id=”adp2jMfGQdI” source=”youtube” width=”425″ height=”344″ autoplay=”no”]This April 1st begins a new day in your geocaching life. Unlock new geocaching moves that will dramatically increase your find count, give you a leg up on FTFs, and have you signing more TFTCs. From the makers of the (not very) popular Geocaching.com Hamster videos, watch Cachers of Steel: Cachin’s the Fashion. Discover the all-new fitness craze that’s inspired by the world’s favorite outdoor hobby. You’ll learn new tricks of the trade with Cachers of Steel that include Ammo Can Deadlifts and Muggle Ducking, even watch an exclusive interview with Signal! This workout is guaranteed to have you FTFing, TFTCing, using your TOTTs like a pro—you’ll never forget to BYOP again!Order at Shop Geocaching NOW!Share with your Friends:More SharePrint Related3 Tips for New Geocachers – Geocaching.com Weekly NewsletterSeptember 12, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”The Weekly Mailer: Working for YouDecember 14, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”Announcing the April 2013 Geocacher of the MonthMay 20, 2013In “Community”last_img read more

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Blower Doors Have Become Essential

first_imgAnd what are blower doors used for?Blower doors are primarily used for measuring the airtightness of buildings, but they have meandered into other parts of home performance work. A brief aside about measuring building tightness: The blower-door test as most auditors understand it is called the “single-point blower-door test”: it’s an air flow rate measurement (reported in cfm, or cubic feet per minute) taken once at 50 pascals of negative pressure relative to the outdoors.Here’s the issue: this can’t be used to calculate a building’s year-round air leakage rate any more than a single day’s worth of weather will reflect an area’s annual climate. There are a jillion different factors that affect the data produced by blower doors, all of which need to be taken with a few trainloads of salt.That said, a blower door can give a sense of the magnitude of air leakage, identify more severe air leakage pathways in the building, and reveal possibly unknown air leakage issues in the building enclosure. Check out Allison Bailes’ blogs on this issue (“Ventilation Requirements for Weatherized Homes” and “A Blower Door Can’t Tell You How Much Mechanical Ventilation You Need.”). Both blogs are followed by comments from Michael Blasnik and Joe Lstiburek, who have a fascinating back-and-forth debating the merits of using a blower door to make decisions about IAQ and mechanical ventilation problems. Blower-door-directed air sealingBlower doors are now often used by insulation contractors during weatherization work. After performing air sealing and weatherization, a running blower door can help refine the work, making any flaws apparent. The blower door can help make the insulation and weatherization job more thorough, creating a tighter and warmer house.Blower doors are also used for confirming airtightness for building efficiency programs. LEED, HERS, the Passivhaus standard, and some new energy codes all include building air tightness requirements.Heat loss due to air leaks makes up a huge component of your heating bill. For decades, the tightness of the building envelope has been only a secondary concern for builders. But now that builders have access to blower doors, that’s changing — and changing rapidly. BLOGS BY ERIC NORTH Major Thermal BypassesFlash and Batt InsulationExterior Insulation Is Like Like A Sweater For Your HouseHeat Loss from Air Is No Big Deal, Right?Insulating Stud Cavities in Existing Homes The Difference Between Air Conditioners and DehumidifiersHow to Insulate and Air-Seal Pull-Down Attic StairsHow to Insulate and Air Seal an Attic HatchCan Switching to a Dual-Flush Toilet Save Heat?Essential Energy-Audit Equipment The nuts and bolts (and manometers)A blower door has three components: the fan, manometer, and sheathing structure.The fan is very large and adjustable, able to move enough air to depressurize most small residential structures.Manometers are finely tuned pressure gauges measuring minute variations in the pressure between the exterior and the interior of the fan. Manometers themselves are very useful for testing flue gas pressures, zone diagnostics (testing pressures between different sections of the house), and combustion zone testing. Why, I ought to write a post just about manometers (mental note to self).The mounting frame is an adjustable aluminum frame with vinyl fabric sheathing. When it is first set up, the frame is loosely fit into the door frame and then tightened with expanding gaskets. The fan is fit into the lower half of the frame and is attached to the manometer to measure air flow.With an Energy Conservatory blower door (the type invented and developed by Gary Nelson, the guy in the photo at the top of the page), there is a green air hose which goes to the exterior of the building and a red air hose attaching the fan to the manometer. Why am I mentioning this? Because the green hose needs to be 6+ feet away from the fan to avoid the fan’s exterior exhaust. And if you forget the green hose prior to installing the frame and fan, you’ll need to take the fan out and crawl through the bottom of the blower door to do so.This is known as the Energy Auditor Crawl of Shame … and we’ve all done it. RELATED ARTICLES Blower Door BasicsWhat’s a Blower Door Good For? Blower Door Testers WantedPinpointing Leaks With a Fog MachineQuestions and Answers About Air Barrierscenter_img Blower doors are spoken of in reverential tones in energy circles. Or at least they were a few years back. Now you can’t throw a manometer without hitting a contractor setting up a blower door. Which is a very, very good thing.With the incorporation of air leakage standards into various housing codes, blower doors are becoming essential. In fact, I tell customers that a simple shorthand for whether your insulation contractors grok building science is whether they own/use/understand blower doors.Something I’ve found pleasantly surprising is the breadth of folks who’ve at least heard of blower doors. I’ve had a fair history over the years with construction and landscaping work, but I had never heard of blower doors prior to my energy auditing days. So when customers chirp up that they’ve heard of blower doors, it’s pretty cool, even if they haven’t yet seen one in action.And once you do see a blower door in action, its usefulness for building diagnostics is pretty inescapable. What is a blower door?A blower door is at the heart of the push in modern residential construction toward tightening the building envelope.A blower door depressurizes residential buildings (or if you have a really, really large fan, then commercial buildings), revealing the tightness of and flaws in the building enclosure. Erik North, the owner of Free Energy Maine, is an energy auditor and home performance specialist in Westbrook, Maine. He is also the author of the Energy Auditing Blog.last_img read more

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