COSAFA Women U17: Uganda concedes late to share spoils in opener

first_imgUganda’s caotain Juliet Nalukenge tries to skip over a challenge in the draw against Zambia on Friday. (PHOTO/Courtesy)COSAFA U17 Women’s Championships Uganda 1-1 ZambiaXavier Stadium, MauritiusFriday, 20-09-2019The Uganda U17 Women’s national team conceded a late equalizer as they drew 1-1 with Zambia in their opening COSAFA championships in Mauritius.Goalkeeper Daphne Nanyenga turned out to be the vilan as she fail to comfortably hold onto a routine shot with a few minutes to play.Nanyenga let a Sherry Musomo shot slip through her grasps in the 83rd minutes as the two sides drew.Earlier in the second half, Juliet Nalukenge had converted from the spot to hand Uganda the lead.The skipper made no mistake from 12 yards after Kevin Kakachwa was brought down in the area midway the second period.Uganda will next take on hosts Mauritius on Sunday before finishing the group stages with a date against Comoros.Khalifa maintains faith in his initial set upUganda’s head coach Ayub Khalifa largely maintained the team that he has been starting in the practice games that they played before departing for Mauritius.The backline saw Patricia Akiror partner Stella Musubika with Gillian Akadinda and Bira Nadunga offering the width infront of Musomo.The midfield saw Nakachwa team up with Shakira Nyinagahirwa and Zaitun Namaganda.Upfront, Fauzia Najjemba, Magraret Kunihira and Nalukenge lined up in search of goals.At the start, the team struggled to maintain possession with Zambia asking most of the questions and dominating play.As Zambia consistently pushed forward, Khalifa’s side resorted to counter attacks.After the first half ended in a draw, Nakachwa surged forward and was brought down in the penalty area prompting which Nalukenge put away.Nalukenge nearly doubled Uganda’s lead when she volleyed Akiror’s cross but the effort went off target.Najjemba who looked lively throughout was named player of the match.Uganda’s Starting XIDaphine Nanyenga, Gillian Akadinda, Patricia Akiror, Stella Musubika, Bira Nadunga, Kevin Nakachwa, Shakira Nyinagahirwa, Zaitun Namaganda, Juliet Nalukenge, Margaret Kunihira, Fauzia NajjembaComments Tags: COSAFA U17crested cranestoplast_img read more

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All-Electric Buildings Can Work in Cold Climates

first_imgA decade ago, the prevailing wisdom held that all-electric buildings presented many challenges: They were served by dirty coal instead of cleaner natural gas, they struggled to meet temperature setpoints in cold climates, and they drastically increased utility bills. Why, then, this big push toward electrification? Simply put, electrification is an essential strategy for achieving the aggressive climate goals laid out in America’s Pledge and in the climate action plans implemented by leading cities across the country. And electrification is now being fueled more and more by clean renewable energy, which is cheaper (in most cases) than natural gas — and is by far safer and healthier. However, the myth of all-electric buildings not meeting demand in cold climates continues. Rocky Mountain Institute’s (RMI’s) new Cold Climate Addendum to our Economics of Zero-Energy Homes: Single Family Insights report is the latest in a series of myth-busting reports showing how many of these assumptions are outdated. Our analysis demonstrates how deep efficiency combined with photovoltaic (PV) panels can drastically improve the economics of electrification and make our homes safer and more comfortable.RELATED ARTICLESNet-Zero Homes Show Signs of Convergent EvolutionJust Two Minisplits Heat and Cool the Whole HouseHeat-Pump Water Heaters in Cold ClimatesZero Energy Ready Homes Gain GroundEvery New Home Should be Zero-Energy Ready Why electrify? Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 80% or more will require essentially eliminating the GHGs produced by buildings — which is only possible at scale with all-electric buildings tied to a clean electricity grid. Electrification is also essential to improve the safety of our housing stock. Seventy million American homes and businesses burn natural gas, oil, or propane on site to heat their space and water and cook food, generating 560 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions each year — a tenth of total U.S. CO2 emissions. Having natural gas in homes can also create health and safety concerns. For example, leaks can result in carbon monoxide poisoning, which causes 400 deaths, 20,000 visits to an emergency room, and 4,000 hospitalizations in America annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In short, buildings are responsible for upwards of a billion tons of annual CO2e emissions — all because we burn a highly explosive gas in our furnaces, hot water heaters, clothes dryers, stoves, and fireplaces. The United States is making significant progress in replacing coal with clean energy, with overall coal use declining from over 50% of electricity generation to under 30% in less than a decade. While Figure 1 (below) shows that the grid has gotten cleaner in the last decade by reducing coal and increasing renewable sources of electricity like wind and solar, there is still a long way to go before our grid becomes carbon-free. RMI’s Economics of Electrifying Buildings report clearly shows that electrifying the building stock today will result in carbon reductions in the majority of the United States and, in the pockets of the country where coal power is still a significant portion of the electricity mix, we expect those coal plants will be shut down in the foreseeable future. [Image source: U.S. Energy Information Administration] Is electrification possible in cold climates? Just as the grid has improved over the past decade, so has building technology. Cold climate heat pumps can effectively heat houses even as outdoor temperatures hit -12°F, with supplemental electric-resistance heat as a backup when really needed. In our analysis, supplemental heat was utilized only 3% of the time in Bozeman, Montana (representing Climate Zone 6), and 10% of the time in Duluth, Minnesota (representing Climate Zone 7). Heat-pump water heaters (HPWHs) also utilize electric-resistance backup heat for those times when heat-pump technology alone cannot meet water temperature setpoints, whether due to an undersized system or the ambient temperature getting too low. In cold climates, HPWHs should be placed indoors so they are not utilizing electric-resistance heat excessively. Placing HPWHs indoors eliminates the requirement for electric-resistance backup heat, but does increase the amount of space heating needed. The good news is that in both cold climate locations studied, the heat pumps were able to maintain space and water heating at desired temperatures. How economical are all-electric zero-energy homes? Despite electrification being technically feasible, only 8% of all existing homes are served by electric space heating in cold climates, and less than 1% are served by heat pumps. This is likely due to electrification resulting in higher utility bills when it is not implemented as part of a highly-efficient, integrated design strategy. We modeled an all-electric baseline and a natural gas baseline in Climate Zones 5, 6, and 7, with both baselines meeting IECC 2009 energy code standards. We found that while the up-front costs tend to be lower for an all-electric baseline, the energy bills were significantly higher in colder climates. Interestingly enough, you can tunnel through this economic barrier by pursuing deeper levels of efficiency and adding PV. In Table 1, we compare an electric code-baseline home, an electric zero-energy (ZE) home, and an electric zero-energy ready (ZER) home to a natural gas baseline home using the net present value of up-front cost and energy bill savings over 12 years (the typical time homeowners plan to stay in their homes) and 30 years (the typical mortgage length). We define a ZE home as a home that produces as much renewable energy as it uses over the course of a year and a ZER home as a home that is as efficient as a ZE home, but without renewables. Added value at resale and mortgage compared to a natural gas-heated IECC 2009 baseline. We found that, in every instance, pursuing ZER homes was more economical than just electrifying space-heating equipment with code-compliant equipment, and in colder climates it actually changed the economics of electrification from being painful to homeowners to being beneficial. ZE homes told a more interesting economic story. Over the resale timeframe, they performed economically in a fairly similar way to simply electrifying the heating equipment with code baseline equipment, except in Climate Zone 7, where ZE homes were far more economical. Using the 30-year mortgage timeframe, ZE homes are more economical than both ZER and electric baseline homes. It is worth noting that while this analysis includes the federal solar investment tax credit, it does not include local incentives nor savings from eliminating gas hookups, which would help ZE homes break even with natural gas homes even sooner. Looking toward the future Electrification is a requisite strategy for achieving our climate action and public health goals. While deep levels of efficiency can make electrification in newly constructed homes economic today, builders may need a push from policymakers and utilities to feel comfortable changing their designs from business-as-usual natural gas in these cold-climate locations. Policymakers and utilities should stop incentivizing new gas hookups and appliances. Additionally, utilities should stop socializing the cost of gas infrastructure extensions through their rate bases. Instead, they should begin providing incentives to homeowners and builders to electrify, including offering expedited permitting for electric equipment, more financial incentives, and technical assistance and training for the labor force. The good news is many cities understand the importance of electrification and are developing policies to promote it, which will result in a decarbonized and safer building stock.   Alisa Petersen and Michael Gartman are senior associates on the Rocky Mountain Institute’s Buildings team. ©2019 Rocky Mountain Institute. Published with permission. Originally posted at the RMI Outlet.last_img read more

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In The Spotlight – Anthony Ziade

first_imgIn the eleventh edition of In The Spotlight, Australian Men’s Open player, Anthony Ziade, speaks about how he got involved in Touch Football and the biggest influences on his Touch Football career.  Name: Anthony ZiadeNickname: ZeeAge: 31Affiliate: Western Suburbs MagpiesOccupation: BuilderPosition: LinkDebut for Australia: 2000 Under 20’s, 2004 Men’s Open. Career highlights so far: Winning 2007 World Cup, 2010 Trans Tasman, winning the Vawdon Cup and State Cup double for Wests in 2005.How you got involved in Touch Football: My two older sisters played for Wests. My school teacher, Steve Murphy, who was a current Australian Men’s Open player got me involved in the sport.Favourite player: Garry SondaWhat does it mean to you to be representing Australia at the 2011 World Cup: I’m excited to play with my good mate Jamie Stowe and to be coached by my club coaches Paul Sfeir and Tony Trad at the top level.Biggest influence on your Touch Football career: Tony Trad – not only a mentor but a great friend.Favourite sporting moment: Kostya Tszyu knocking out Zab Judah.What do you know about Scotland: No underpants, kilts, haggis and William Wallace.Any superstitions: Same seat on the team bus to and from games.Funniest Australian teammate: Jamie Stowe.Favourite quote: This is a quote from my good mate Paul Sfeir – “It’s better than a sliced breakfast.”Any travel plans for after World Cup: YesStay tuned to the website for the upcoming editions of In The Spotlight, which will feature every Open’s player travelling to the World Cup. With only 43 days to go until the 2011 Federation of International Touch World Cup, be sure to be regularly visiting the Touch Football Australia website to keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information. Don’t forget to become a fan of Touch Football Australia on Facebook and Twitter in the lead up to the 2011 World Cup to find out all you need to know about Australia’s World Cup campaign:http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Touch-Football-Australia/384949403384 www.twitter.com/touchfootyauslast_img read more

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a month agoValverde: Granada a test of Barcelona credentials

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Valverde: Granada a test of Barcelona credentialsby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona coach Ernesto Valverde expects a big test of their credentials at Granada.Barcelona have failed to win either of their opening two LaLiga Santander games on the road, first losing to Athletic Club (1-0) before drawing with Osasuna (2-2).That was followed up by a 0-0 draw at Borussia Dortmund in the Champions League in midweek and Valverde feels that all has to change.”Away from home we are not getting good results, it is costing us,” Valverde said during his press conference.”The [Osasuna] game in Pamplona, which we turned around, we were not able to win. We have to change that dynamic.”These kind of grounds can determine the championship because it is where you cannot slip.” last_img read more

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Wisconsin Star Joe Schobert Thinks Iowa’s Offensive Line May Be Better Than Alabama’s

first_imgWisconsin's stadium from the back of one of the end zones.MADISON, WI – SEPTEMBER 10: A general view of Camp Randall Stadium as the Wisconsin Badgers take on the Oregon State Beavers at on September 10, 2011 in Madison Wisconsin. Wisconsin defeated Oregon State 35-0. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)In the season opener, Wisconsin went up against Alabama, and the Crimson Tide had little trouble opening up holes for star running back Derrick Henry. The junior back ran for 147 yards and three touchdowns on just 13 carries against the Badgers. Wisconsin star linebacker Joe Schobert doesn’t think that ‘Bama necessarily has the best offensive line that he’s faced. That honor goes to the Iowa Hawkeyes. Schobert had a monster game in a losing effort against Iowa, with three sacks and two forced fumbles, but he had a ton of praise for the Hawkeyes, per The Gazette. “I put them on par with Alabama, maybe even a little more,” Schobert told the Dubuque Telegraph Herald. “They want to hit you more than Alabama wants to hit you. Alabama is a good, physical offensive line, but I think Iowa kind of takes it to that next step and wants to run at you and wants to physically punch you. We knew that coming in and they lived up to it today. It was just great competition between us and them.”The advanced line stats tell a bit of a mixed story. According to Football Study Hall, Alabama ranks 23rd nationally in adjusted line rushing yards, and 40th in adjusted sack rate. Iowa is better in preventing sack (18th) but lags behind in the run blocking analytics (69th). Either way, Iowa should be proud of the huge Big Ten West win. Being mentioned in the same breath as Alabama is rarely a bad thing.[The Gazette]last_img read more

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Parents Of Texas A&M’s Admon Gilder Left Game Early, Missed His Game-Tying Layup vs. Northern Iowa

first_imgAdmon Gilder shoots a lay up against Northern Iowa.Twitter/@marchmadnessTexas A&M’s epic comeback against Northern Iowa, in which the Aggies made up a 12 point deficit in 44 seconds, is statistically the greatest last-minute comeback in college basketball history. Unfortunately, the parents of Admon Gilder, the Aggie who capped off the comeback with the game-tying layup before the buzzer, weren’t in the arena to see it. The Gilders left the game minutes earlier, assuming that the Aggies were about to lose, to head back to Dallas with work the next morning. Of course, because of it they missed their son being part of basketball history.Admon Gilder says his parents left Northern Iowa game early to get back to Dallas for work. Watched end in car on phone.— Kate Hairopoulos (@khairopoulos) March 23, 2016Yahoo Sports‘ Jeff Eisenberg has more:“They left the game with probably about a minute to go,” the younger Gilder said Wednesday. “They were at the gas station on the way back and someone came out and told them that I’d just hit the game-tying shot.”Paula and Admon Sr. both had to be at work early the next morning in their hometown of Dallas, a roughly four-hour drive from Oklahoma City. They decided they were already too far from the arena to turn around, so they followed overtime and double overtime on their phones instead.Gilder, now an Aggie hero, doesn’t hold it against his parents.“I probably would have left too,” Gilder said.Don’t expect to see the Gilders leaving Thursday’s game in Anaheim against Oklahoma early…unless they think they’re bringing the team a bit of luck.[Yahoo Sports]More: Vote In Our “Most Annoying People In Sports Media” Bracket >>>last_img read more

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The Offer That MLB Players Always Refuse Even When They Shouldnt

Jordan Zimmermann2.8 Howie Kendrick2.4 Dexter Fowler1.7 John Lackey2.6 Zack Greinke4.0 Hisashi Iwakuma3.3 Jeff Samardzija2.7 PLAYERS WHO RECEIVED QUALIFYING OFFERSPROJECTED WAR Ian Kennedy2.1 Brett Anderson2.0 Wei-Yin Chen2.6 Justin Upton3.0 Ian Desmond1.6 The offer also serves another purpose, which is to reward the offering team with a valuable draft pick if the player should sign with another club; conversely, the signing team loses a draft pick. In practical terms, this has the effect of reducing a player’s value to any other team and making it easier for the original team to re-sign its free agent. In most cases, the draft pick is a small consolation prize for losing a superstar. But when it comes to some marginal players, the possible reward of the pick (worth about 1 WAR) is just enough incentive for a team to extend an offer to a player who might not otherwise be projected to achieve 2 WAR.The choice of whether to accept a qualifying offer is harder from the player’s perspective. The qualifying offer is a low-risk, low-reward option compared with what could be a bigger payday on the free-agent market, although there’s greater uncertainty about how much the payout will be. So far, every single player who has received a qualifying offer has refused it (not counting this year’s crop). In the case of the few players who are not likely worth an offer but still receive one, the near-pathological confidence necessary to be a professional athlete may be the factor compelling them to refuse. In some instances, that’s led to decent players remaining unemployed until mid-year the following season. Just ask Stephen Drew about that.As a result of these incentives, qualifying offer season has become somewhat predictable. The math works out so that teams tender offers to almost every remotely deserving free agent. Without fail, those free agents refuse them, only to find their eventual contract value reduced by the draft pick that their new team had to give up. Chris Davis2.4 Yovani Gallardo1.7 It’s qualifying offer season in Major League Baseball, that most anticlimactic time of year when teams offer one-year deals to a handful of players on the brink of free agency. Those “qualifying offers” are artifacts of a system that was introduced in the last collective bargaining agreement to compensate teams that lose free agents. Every qualifying offer is the same: Teams can offer $15.8 million to impending free agents who weren’t traded in the past year for one more year of service. If a player accepts, he takes the money but sacrifices the chance to see what the market thinks he’s worth. How teams and players should go about offering, accepting and denying qualifying offers are interesting questions.From a team’s perspective, the decision to tender a qualifying offer is relatively straightforward. Each offer is essentially a bet that the player will be worth more than the $15.8 million salary. Since each win above replacement (WAR) costs about $7 million to $8 million on the free-agent market, that wager is equivalent to projecting that a player will be worth 2 or more WAR in the coming year.1The math is slightly more complicated than this when you consider that wins are worth different amounts to playoff contenders versus rebuilding teams and can be afforded more easily by big-market outfits than smaller franchises. In some cases (Jason Heyward, Zack Greinke), that’s an easy bet to take, while in others (Colby Rasmus, Ian Desmond), the projection is a little shakier. Alex Gordon3.5 Jason Heyward4.7 Daniel Murphy2.1 Colby Rasmus0.8 Marco Estrada0.8 Matt Wieters2.2 read more

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Rice University expert available to discuss implications of fire that destroyed Harris

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE: 713-348-6778E-MAIL: [email protected] University expert available to discuss implications of fire that destroyed Harris County’s electronic voting equipmentComputer scientist says county may have to resort to paper ballots on Nov. 2Rice University computer scientist and electronic voting expert Dan Wallach is available to comment on the implications for the Nov. 2 election of an early morning warehouse fire that reportedly destroyed all of the electronic voting machines in Harris County, Texas, the nation’s third-most populous county. A three-alarm fire began about 4:15 a.m. at the Harris County Voting Machine Warehouse in the 600 block of Canino Road. Firefighters got the blaze under control within two hours, but news reports indicate that the contents of the warehouse, including some 10,000 eSlate voting machines, were destroyed. County officials have reportedly announced plans to borrow equipment from surrounding counties to support early voting, which begins in mid-October.Produced by Austin-based Hart InterCivic, the eSlate machines are the mainstay of the county’s voting system. With an estimated population of more than 4 million, Harris County is the most populous county in Texas and the third-most populous county in the United States.“The county doesn’t yet have a solution for Election Day,” Wallach said. “One possible solution might be to print paper ballots, where voters will fill in bubbles with a pen. This may require makeshift ballot boxes and voting booths, but the county’s existing election management software can support high-speed industrial paper scanners, which should be feasible to acquire before Nov. 2.”Wallach is an associate professor of computer science and of electrical and computer engineering at Rice. His research involves computer security and the issues of building secure and robust software systems for the Internet. He is the director of ACCURATE (A Center for Correct, Usable, Reliable, Auditable and Transparent Elections), a five-year research effort sponsored by the National Science Foundation with the aim of developing more robust and secure electronic voting technology. Wallach also has worked on a number of high-profile voting security projects, including a 2003 study, with Johns Hopkins University, that found flaws in Diebold’s e-voting systems, and in the state of California’s 2007 “Top-to-Bottom Review” of electronic voting systems. This study, which included a review of the Hart InterCivic technology used in Harris County, left no further doubt of the insecurities of the nation’s existing e-voting systems. Wallach has testified about voting security issues before a variety of government bodies and has had research support from the Texas Advanced Technology Program, Google, IBM, Microsoft and Schlumberger. To schedule an interview with Wallach, contact Jade Boyd, associate director of news and media relations, at 713-348-6778 or [email protected]last_img read more

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