U.S. Ethanol Production Declines for the Fifth Consecutive Week,

first_img By Gary Truitt – May 3, 2017 Facebook Twitter Home Energy U.S. Ethanol Production Declines for the Fifth Consecutive Week, Facebook Twitter U.S. Ethanol Production Declines for the Fifth Consecutive Week, Previous articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for May 4, 2017Next articleNew AHCA Even Worse for Family Farmers says NFU Gary Truitt SHARE According to EIA data, ethanol production averaged 986,000 barrels per day (b/d)—or 41.41 million gallons daily. That is down 1,000 b/d from the week before. The four-week average for ethanol production decreased for the fifth consecutive week, landing at 988,000 b/d for an annualized rate of 15.146 billion gallons.Contrary to most expectations, stocks of ethanol diminished only slightly from last week. Stocks decreased just 0.4% to 23.2 million barrels, 7.4% higher than year-ago levels.Imports of ethanol were nonexistent for the 36th straight week.Average weekly gasoline demand stood at 384.6 million gallons (9.156 million barrels) daily. Refiner/blender input of ethanol decreased 0.5% to 927,000 b/d. Still, the implied ethanol blend rate in gasoline supplied to the market was 10.12%, the eighth time this year (17 weeks) that the 10% threshold has been exceeded (compared to zero times during the same period last year).Expressed as a percentage of daily gasoline demand, daily ethanol production was 10.77%, a full percentage point higher than one year ago.Source: RFA SHARElast_img read more

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Chairperson says Donegal County Council is well placed to maximise cross border cooperation

first_img Facebook Chairperson says Donegal County Council is well placed to maximise cross border cooperation By News Highland – January 12, 2015 GAA decision not sitting well with Donegal – Mick McGrath RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Google+ The Chairman of Donegal County Council says the authority has a lot to contribute to the North West, and is working closely with other bodies to maximise the region’s potential.Cllr John Campbell was speaking after a meeting with Regional Development Minister Danny Kennedy in Stormont attended by a number of other bodies, including the newly formed Derry and Strabane Council which takes office on April first.Infrastructural issues including the A5 upgrade were on the agenda, but Cllr Campbell is stressing the council isn’t just going to these meetings with its hand out…………Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/jcmon.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. WhatsApp Twitter Facebook WhatsAppcenter_img Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Pinterest Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Homepage BannerNews Nine Til Noon Show – Listen back to Wednesday’s Programme Previous articleCouncil stresses Lifford water main works have no connection with meter installationNext articleTyrone stay on course for semi finals News Highland Pinterest Google+ LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Twitterlast_img read more

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Samuel Hutchison Beer

first_imgSamuel Hutchison Beer, the distinguished Harvard political scientist, died in his sleep at the age of 97 in Washington, D.C., on April 7, 2009.His special field was British politics, in which he was for years the world’s leading expert.  But he also studied the American political system, and, for contrast to academic life, made himself active in American politics as a life-long Democrat and Chairman of Americans for Democratic Action (1959-1962).  He was a man brave beyond the calling of a professor: in June 1944 he fought in the U.S. Army in Normandy, earning a Bronze Star; and his peacetime hobbies included rock climbing and skydiving.Sam Beer was born on July 28, 1911, in Bucyrus, Ohio, and graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in 1932.  He was a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford, from 1932 to 1935, and married Roberta Frances Reed on June 22, 1935.  He worked on the staff of the Democratic National Committee and as occasional speechwriter for President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935-1936; as a reporter for the New York Post in 1936-1937; and as writer at Fortune magazine in 1937-1938.  He then went to Harvard University for graduate study and received his Ph.D. in political science in 1943.After his wartime duty as Captain in artillery, Beer spent a year in the U.S. Military Government in Germany (1945).  While at Oxford he had traveled to Germany and taken note of the rising threat of Nazism; after the war he was able to pursue his interest in the question of how so civilized a country, governed as a democracy, could lose so much and come so low.  When he returned to Harvard to teach in 1946, he gave a course on that topic and became the leader of an approach to comparative government that made sense of facts through the ideas of political, social, and economic theory.  He began teaching in Harvard’s new General Education program “Social Sciences 2,” a course on Western thought and institutions that was as much history as political science, and as much political theory as comparative government. He continued this famous course for over 30 years to the benefit and admiration of thousands of Harvard undergraduates. And for all those years he met regularly with the graduate student teaching fellows in the course, who discovered that they were arguing with a professor who had formed his opinions but also, unconcerned with display or triumph, helped them to form theirs.Sam Beer’s first book was titled The City of Reason (1949), a study in the tradition of Oxford idealism that sees the reason inherent in human things rather than hovering above them and criticizing irrationalities.  Avoiding the vague complacency of such a view, he turned to facts and entered the domain of social science, where he took care to consider the fact of human intent and to maintain the role of ideas.  He launched the thorough study of British politics that made him celebrated in Britain as the man who knew their politics better than they did.  In 1965 he published the book that secured his reputation, British Politics in the Collectivist Age, combining an analysis of postwar British socialism with the hard facts of political parties and pressure groups.  Beer was for years the foremost scholar of British politics, the master of its very British intricacies and a detective who found their apparently accidental coherence.  Though an admirer of Britain, he never believed that British politics could be a model for American politics, in which he had an absorbing interest that was not merely academic.  In 1982 he published Britain Against Itself: The Political Contradictions of Collectivism, a sequel analyzing the stagnation of collectivism in the interplay of interests it had created.Always a partisan outside but never inside the classroom, Beer took a leading role in opposing the student rebellion of the late Sixties at Harvard, criticizing the politicization of universities.  In 1998 he also criticized the politicization of impeachment, testifying to the House of Representatives in the case of President Clinton.  His study of American politics was crowned by the publication of his major work To Make a Nation: The Rediscovery of American Federalism in 1993, when he was 82.  In it he stressed the original national purpose behind the idea of states’ rights, often abused to diminish the American nation.At Harvard Beer served as the Eaton Professor of the Science of Government from 1971 and was chair of the Department of Government from 1954 to 1958.  He received an honorary doctorate from Harvard in 1997.  Retiring at Harvard in 1982, and with vitality intact, he moved to Boston College to become the first Thomas P. O’Neill, Jr., Professor of American Politics, in part to honor his friend, the former Speaker of the House of Representatives.  He was also elected President of the American Political Science Association in 1977, and was made a Fellow of the British Academy in 2000.The honors Beer received and even the books he wrote were emblems of the life he led, which was the life of a teacher.  His teaching was memorable above all for the warmth of the virtue he conveyed in it.  Neither cynic nor idealist, the everyday world’s recalcitrance to our most compelling ideals never dampened his good cheer.His hearty affections were in plain sight: for his wife, Jane, his true companion; for his beloved late wife, Roberta (who died in 1987); for his children, Kitty, Frances, and Billy (who died in 1991), his step-children, Alison and Camilla, and his grandchildren, step-grandchildren, and great-grandchild; for his hometown Bucyrus; for Harvard, his intellectual home for over 70 years, and his many students there; for Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Democratic Party; and for his country, which he served wisely in peace and bravely in war.Respectfully submitted,Peter HallJ. Russell MuirheadMelvin RichterMichael WalzerHarvey C. Mansfield, Chairlast_img read more

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Marty’s last call

first_imgCincinnati, OH—After 46 years in the broadcast booth, today is the final game for Marty Brennaman. The broadcaster known for his “this one belongs to the Reds” signoff is retiring after 46 years with the Cincinnati Reds.The Reds’ voice since 1974, Brennaman originally intended to quietly retire and fade into private life after last season. He relented and agreed to a farewell season that would allow fans and teams to show their appreciation. He says he will more than likely cry thru the last broadcast.  His voice is virtually inseparable from the 46 years of Reds’ history immortalized through his calls. From the era of the Big Red Machine to the 1990 World Series team, Brennaman has seen the high points and the lows of the franchise: Hank Aaron’s 714th homer that tied Babe Ruth, three World Series titles and Pete Rose’s record-setting hit No. 4,192 among the most memorable.Brennaman shared the broadcast booth for 31 seasons with the Reds Hall of Fame pitcher Joe Nuxall. They’d talk about the Big Red Machine’s exploits and compare notes on garden tomatoes. Fans referred to them simply as Marty and Joe. The beloved duo separated in 2004 as Nuxhall retired. Three years later, the “old left-hander” died.The first 20,000 fans at today’s game will receive a Reds transistor radio so they can hear every word of Marty’s call of the game while in the park. There will also be a postgame “Marty party” on the field where everyone in the park will honor Brennaman, who will be on stage with Jim Day at the pitcher’s mound.last_img read more

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Olympia Resident Re-elected to Chair the State Conservation Commission

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Washington State Conservation CommissionOlympia-area resident James (Jim) Peters has been re-elected to Chair the Washington State Conservation Commission (WSCC). The WSCC is an independent state agency that works with conservation districts to help landowners protect and restore natural resources using incentive-based practices.Commissioner Peters was appointed to the Commission by Governor Gary Locke in 1998, and Governor Jay Inslee recently extended his appointment through June 2015. Peters is a member of the Squaxin Island Tribe and served on the Tribal Council for more than six years as well as the Inter-Tribal Court Board. He is currently the Habitat Policy Analyst for the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.In addition to re-electing Peters as Chair, the Commission elected Clinton O’Keefe to serve as Vice-Chair. Commissioner O’Keefe is a resident of St. John (Whitman County) and was elected to the Commission in 2012 representing Washington’s eastern region.The WSCC also welcomed two new Commissioner members at their December meeting: Alan Stromberger of Sprague (Lincoln County) and Larry Davis of Custer (Whatcom County). Commissioner Stromberger is President of the Washington Association of Conservation Districts (WACD) and a supervisor for Lincoln County Conservation District. Commissioner Davis is a supervisor for Whatcom Conservation District and is serving his third year on the WACD Board of Directors.“These commissioners represent the interests of conservation districts, state agencies, the Governor’s Office, and Washington’s landowners,” said Mark Clark, Executive Director of the WSCC. “Their experience and knowledge help us as a small state agency better integrate state- and local-level conservation directives.”WSCC Commissioners are part of a ten-member board that sets policies for the operation of Washington State’s conservation districts; facilitates resource conservation programs and activities; and coordinates programs across conservation district boundaries. The WSCC also consists of a small staff that carries out the direction of the Commission board and provides direct service to conservation districts.To learn more about the WSCC and the state’s 45 conservation districts, visit the WSCC website: www.scc.wa.gov.last_img read more

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South Africa: We Fix

first_imgVictoria Clarke, who was chief communicator for Donald Rumsfeld, the American secretary of defence, has just published a memoir. The title is “Lipstick on a Pig”. Clarke’s message to those of us who toil in the vineyard of public relations is that if the client has a pig of a story to tell, putting lipstick on it won’t make it any prettier or more saleable.Did I mention Clarke is no longer at the Pentagon?At IMC, we don’t use lipstick. At least not on pigs. We don’t have to. For one thing, we have a great story to tell. For another, nobody is pressing us to hide the bits that aren’t so great. We have challenges in this country, serious ones. They are part of the story. We must never deny it.  In a very important way,  they are part of what of makes our story great.‘Getting things fixed’You see, what makes South Africa the amazing place it is is the extraordinary capacity of our people to meet challenges head on and find solutions.If we’re sometimes a little testy with each other, it’s because we’re impatient with those whose sole contribution is to moan about what’s wrong. But we’ve got lots of time for people who are ready to work on the practicalities of getting things fixed.IMC’s US country manager Simon Barber tells me there’s a garage not far from Washington, which advertises its services in a striking way.  The owner has hoisted a seriously wrecked Volkswagen beetle on the top of a telephone pole and on the side of the beetle, he has painted the words We Fix.  The shop lives up to its motto.  Its mechanics do tough jobs well.Everyone here will, I hope, be familiar with our pay off line for South Africa, “alive with possibility”, but what is it that makes the slogan ring true?  What make this one of the most exciting places to be in the world today?By way of at least a partial answer, our country manager proposes another slogan, borrowed from his local garage: “South Africa — We Fix.”‘Finding solutions’South Africans have established a terrific track record of fixing what others have written off as terminally broken and of finding solutions where others have despaired.Few observers really believed that South Africans would come together the way they did in 1994. As the American columnist Roger Cohen wrote in the International Herald Tribune the other day:“That apartheid’s demise would be violent was almost universally accepted. The swimming pools of the white-owned villas in the leafy northern Johannesburg suburbs would run red with blood; the whites would flee; and the African National Congress would wreck the strongest economy by imposing doctrinaire communism.”Didn’t happen. Instead we have representatives from every troubled corner of the planet — from Iraq,  Palestine and Israel, from Northern Ireland to mention just a few – coming to us to see how we pulled off what actually did happenHow did we do it? Oceans of ink has been spent on this topic, but perhaps the best short explanation I’ve seen came from President Mbeki is his speech to parliament  on the tabling on the TRC report in 2003.“At a critical moment in our history,” he said, “we came as a people to the conclusion that we must, together, end the killing. We took the deliberate decision that a violent conflict was not in the interest of our country nor would it solve our problems.“Together we decided that in the search for a solution to our problems, nobody should be demonized or excluded. We agreed that everybody should become part of the solution, whatever the might have done or represented in the past. This related both to the negotiating of the future of our country and working to build the new South Africa we had all negotiated.”In a nutshell, this is the spirit of  “South Africa – We Fix”.Ordinary people  doing extraordinary thingsI wish everyone would drop, once and for all, the word miracle from the lexicon of descriptions for this country’s achievements. It reeks of  low expectations. And it misses the point. South Africans are not miracle people.We’re quite ordinary human beings with an extraordinary diversity of knowledge, wisdom and talent, who makes things work.And the more we’ve been able combine the splendid diversity of our human capital, the better we’ve made things work.Consider our constitution, ten years old this year. Some people still grumble that it’s a hodgepodge of compromises cobbled together to meet a deadline. Depending on where they’re coming from, they wish there had been fewer protections for property rights or that second generation rights to housing, health care, clean water and the like had not been included or that there had been greater recognition of group rights or that we opted for something other than list based proportional representation.But look at the South Africa the constitution has helped build, precisely because it was able to encompass the full diversity of genius in our country.We are today a tolerant and stable society because everyone came away feeling ownership in the result. And we have a strong economy because our leaders knew to the realize the ambitious social agenda we set for ourselves in the constitution, we would have to create the wealth to pay for it. And what helped us create the wealth? Peace, stability and property rights that are just as secure as they are in the US.‘Steadily rising  growth’Ten years ago, how many of you honestly would have thought we’d be sitting here in 2006 with inflation and interests rate at historic lows, enjoying 87 months of steadily rising growth, with our government in a position to launch a massive capital expenditure program while running budget deficits that are the envy of fiscal hawks the world over?Would you have projected that our stock market would have been among the world’s top performer’s in 2005, posted a total return of 47 per cent? Would you have said we’d be attracting more FDI than India?How many of us really foresaw the creativity and energy that our fusion into a new nation would trigger, or it how would take our economy onto a new plane?Our economy is in the midst of an extraordinary tectonic shift. You see it in the retail sales figures, you see in the explosion in new car sales (and traffic jams), you see it the now almost routine windfalls of unforeseen tax revenue.Maybe we have all underestimated our capacity as South Africans to get things fixed. But other are starting to catch on.‘Doing difficult things well’One of IMC’s guests, Roger Bate, a fellow of the American Enterprise Institute has been telling people after touring the country with us last November: “South Africans seem to specialize in doing difficult things well.”Roger was part of  a group of American science writers to take a look at our science and technology.  We called the 10-day tour South African Solutions.  We took our visitors to Anglogold Ashanti’s Mponeng mine. We took them to Sasol. They saw fuel elements for the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor being manufactured at Pelindaba. They met AIDS researchers doing groundbreaking work at Chris Hani Baragwanath. They saw state-of-the-art winemaking at Tokara. They went to the opening of the Southern African Large Telescope – and spent the night at the Karoo Hotel in Sutherland, which I have to tell you is not on the typical tourist trail.And that was just the half of it. They met biologists, anthropologists, geneticists, nuclear physicists, software engineers, geologists, hydrologists, and more. And to help put it all in context for them, we took them to Robben Island and Hector Pietersen Memorial and its stunning museum, we showed the high points and the low points of Soweto and we had them stay at bed and breakfasts in Orlando West, where, needless to say,  the hospitality was beyond compare.This group will never think or write about South Africa in the same way after that trip. It was impossible not to come away from those ten days without agreeing with Roger Bate that South Africans do difficult things well.Getting from June 16, 1976 to April 1, 2006 the way we have is no mean feat. It has taken guts, it has taken resourcefulness and a great capacity for lateral thinking, it has taken patience and determination, it has taken teamwork and a talent for human relations. Our politics has not been for amateurs or sissies.Teamwork and collaborationWhile perhaps not in quite the same league of accomplishment, digging gold out of a sliver of a seam three kilometers underground is no mean feat, either.  It too takes guts, resourcefulness and lateral thinking,  patience and determination, and, yes, a great capacity for teamwork and collaboration.  It’s not for amateurs or sissies, either. The pressure down there makes the rock hot to the touch. To cool it at the Mponeng mine, Anglogold Ashanti has had to build the largest snowmaking machine in the world.To anyone here who hasn’t been down one of our deep mines, I strongly recommend it – it’s an outlook changing experience. In every sense, it helps you understand what we’re made of. Let’s say it again. South Africans do difficult things well.Every sort of difficult thing: From building prize-winning catamarans to inventing respirators that may save countless miner’s lives using gold as a catalyst to turn deadly carbon monoxide into CO2.From solving the riddles of a nuclear reactor technology that will reinvent the industry to uncovering the secret lives of dinosaurs from the fossilized residue of the DNA.From designing software that will track down and deter corruption to converting the might of the Congo River into light for a continent.From inventing the world’s first truly economic photovoltaic solar panel to revolutionizing the care and treatment of AIDS patients in resource poor setting by designing new testing equipment and harnessing the Internet for long distance diagnostics and patient monitoring.Most difficult of allAnd yes, we do that most difficult of things. We make great wine. Congratulations to Vergelegen for being named best new world wine of the year by Wine Enthusiast in New York.And let’s not forget great films. Out of South Africans’ wondrous fusion comes Oscar-winner Tsotsi. Tsotsi is a vital window on the South African condition. It reminds us that we still have much to fix. Poverty, crime, disease.  But in its message of redemption, not to mention the enormous talent it puts on display ,  Tsotsi also reminds us, and the world, that we have it in us as South Africans to do the fixing.South Africa. We don’t put lipstick on a pig. We fix.Yvonne Johnstonlast_img read more

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Why I Started Exercising First Every Day

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now For five years, I wrote a blog post every morning at 5:00 AM. On the weekends I might have slept in until 7:00 AM, but the first thing I did upon waking was grabbing a cup of coffee, sitting down at my desk, and start writing the daily blog.Waking up at 5:00 AM to write was what allowed me to be consistent. It allowed me to invest time in writing and developing my social presence without having to give up anything else. Well, almost anything else. I did have to give up the time I spent exercising.A few months ago I decided that writing this blog was not my very highest priority. In fact, writing a blog post first each day was working against my highest priority. My highest value is freedom. And I need the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health to pursue that goal. So I decided to make a change.Now, seven days a week, the first thing I do each day is drive to the small gym run by my personal trainer to lift weights and do bodyweight exercises. My personal trainer believes in a core routine of deadlifts, clean and press, squats, and push and pull motions. He also loves intense bodyweight exercises, like push ups and pull-ups (which exposes your exceedingly limited upper body strength better than any other exercise).I don’t do physical labor in any of my work roles (unless you consider typing physical labor). I am what Peter Drucker described as a “knowledge worker.” But my body is the vessel in which my brain and mind live, and it is critical that I keep that environment in impeccably good health.Your physical health is the foundation of every other result you produce. By putting my health and fitness first, I ensure that it gets done before the rest of my work day crowds out the time and the energy I need. You make that expended energy you are using energy, but you are creating energy.Whatever your priorities are, you are going to achieve them faster and more certainly if you take care of your health first. This is why I started exercising first every morning.last_img read more

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Miami Football: Report: 4-Star 2017 WR Kemore Gamble Commits To Miami

first_imgKemore Gable commits to Miami.Twitter/@kemoregamble15According to a report by 247Sports’ Ryan Bartow, Al Golden has added yet another top player to the 2017 class, in four-star receiver Kemore Gamble.Breaking: 4-star WR Kemore Gamble commits to #Miami. @kemoregamble15 @jcshurburtt— Ryan Bartow (@RyanBartow) June 17, 2015Gamble, a Miami native, is listed a 6-foot-3, 200 pounds. His commitment comes after camping at Miami back on June 6. He also holds offers from Louisville, Rutgers, Syracuse, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and others.With this commitment, Miami has eight players in its 2017 class, which currently ranks third nationally.last_img

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Wisconsin Star Joe Schobert Thinks Iowa’s Offensive Line May Be Better Than Alabama’s

first_imgWisconsin's stadium from the back of one of the end zones.MADISON, WI – SEPTEMBER 10: A general view of Camp Randall Stadium as the Wisconsin Badgers take on the Oregon State Beavers at on September 10, 2011 in Madison Wisconsin. Wisconsin defeated Oregon State 35-0. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)In the season opener, Wisconsin went up against Alabama, and the Crimson Tide had little trouble opening up holes for star running back Derrick Henry. The junior back ran for 147 yards and three touchdowns on just 13 carries against the Badgers. Wisconsin star linebacker Joe Schobert doesn’t think that ‘Bama necessarily has the best offensive line that he’s faced. That honor goes to the Iowa Hawkeyes. Schobert had a monster game in a losing effort against Iowa, with three sacks and two forced fumbles, but he had a ton of praise for the Hawkeyes, per The Gazette. “I put them on par with Alabama, maybe even a little more,” Schobert told the Dubuque Telegraph Herald. “They want to hit you more than Alabama wants to hit you. Alabama is a good, physical offensive line, but I think Iowa kind of takes it to that next step and wants to run at you and wants to physically punch you. We knew that coming in and they lived up to it today. It was just great competition between us and them.”The advanced line stats tell a bit of a mixed story. According to Football Study Hall, Alabama ranks 23rd nationally in adjusted line rushing yards, and 40th in adjusted sack rate. Iowa is better in preventing sack (18th) but lags behind in the run blocking analytics (69th). Either way, Iowa should be proud of the huge Big Ten West win. Being mentioned in the same breath as Alabama is rarely a bad thing.[The Gazette]last_img read more

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