Waterfields scoops up Merseyside bakery chain

first_imgWaterfields has bought Pimblett’s 10 shops in the St Helens’ area of Merseyside out of administration, after the craft bakery chain went out of business at the beginning of the month.Around 65 jobs have been saved in the deal, which takes Waterfields’ retail estate to 49 shops, but Pimblett’s central bakery has been closed, with the loss of 60 jobs. Administrator KPMG said that “tough trading conditions and rising food prices” were to blame for the company’s problems.The 10 shops, which are now being supplied by Waterfields’ main bakery in Leigh, Lanca-shire, will continue to trade as Pimblett’s in the run-up to Christmas, but will be rebranded with Waterfields’ fascia in the New Year, said managing director John Waterfield.”The extra shops complement our business and are not in direct competition with our other stores in the area,” said Waterfield. “Our economies of scale will help to make the stores more successful.”John Pimblett & Sons was founded in 1921 by John and Mary Pimblett and was still a family business, run by third- generation baker John Pimblett, until it ran into trouble. The company was well-known for its pies and celebration cakes.last_img read more

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New dean for Faculty of Medicine

first_img Produced and edited by Joe Sherman/Harvard Staff Daley has been professor of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology at HMS since 2010 and has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 2008. In July he became the Robert A. Stranahan Professor of Pediatrics at HMS, having previously held appointments as professor of pediatrics at HMS and as the inaugural Samuel E. Lux IV Chair of Hematology/Oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital.A former chief resident in medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (1994 to 1995), Daley maintained an active clinical practice in hematology/oncology at MGH and then at Children’s Hospital until assuming his administrative role as director of the Stem Cell Transplantation Program and associate chief of the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Children’s and at Dana-Farber in 2009. He also serves as associate director of the broader Stem Cell Program based at Children’s, which he helped launch in 2004.He has served since 1995 as a member of the faculty of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST), since 2004 as a founding member of the executive committee of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and since 2009 as an associate member of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and a core faculty member of the Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Children’s.Daley’s research focuses on the use of mouse and human disease models to identify mechanisms that underlie blood disorders and cancer. His lab aims to define fundamental principles of how stem cells contribute to tissue regeneration and repair and improve drug and transplantation therapies for patients with malignant and genetic bone marrow disease.Beyond his research, Daley has been a principal figure in developing international guidelines for conducting stem cell research and for the clinical translation of stem cells, particularly through his work with the International Society for Stem Cell Research, for which he has served in several leadership positions, including president (2007 to 2008). He has also testified before Congress and spoken in forums worldwide on the scientific and ethical dimensions of stem cell research and its promise in treating disease.After earning his bachelor’s degree magna cum laude from Harvard in 1982, Daley went on to earn his Ph.D. in biology (1989) at MIT, working in David Baltimore’s laboratory at the MIT-affiliated Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. He received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School, graduating in 1991 with the rare distinction of summa cum laude. He then pursued clinical training in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and was a clinical fellow at Brigham and Women’s and Children’s hospitals. While running a laboratory as a Whitehead Fellow at the Whitehead Institute, he joined the HMS faculty as an assistant professor in 1995, was promoted to associate professor in 2004, was named to an endowed chair at Children’s Hospital in 2009, and became a full professor at HMS in 2010.His teaching efforts include serving as course director for the “Molecular Medicine” course at HMS and for an undergraduate course on “Stem Cells in Disease” in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Earlier, for more than a decade, he led the “Research in Health Sciences and Technology” course in the HST program. He has trained dozens of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, and is a frequent participant in seminars and grand rounds at schools and hospitals both locally and beyond. In 2012 he was recognized with HMS’s A. Clifford Barger Excellence in Mentoring Award.Important contributions from the Daley laboratory have included the creation of customized stem cells to treat genetic immune deficiency in a mouse model (together with Rudolf Jaenisch), the differentiation of germ cells from embryonic stem cells, the generation of disease-specific pluripotent stem cells by direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts, and demonstration of the role of the LIN28/let-7 pathway in cancer. In past research, he demonstrated the central role of the BCR/ABL oncoprotein in human chronic myelogenous leukemia, work that provided critical target validation for development of Gleevec, a highly successful chemotherapy.Daley was an inaugural winner of the National Institutes of Health Director’s Pioneer Award for highly innovative research (2004). His numerous honors include the American Philosophical Society’s Judson Daland Prize for achievement in patient-oriented research, the American Pediatric Society’s E. Mead Johnson Award for contributions to stem cell research, the American Society of Hematology’s E. Donnall Thomas Prize for advances in human-induced pluripotent stem cells, and the International Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Foundation’s Janet Rowley Prize for outstanding lifetime contribution to the understanding and/or treatment of the disease. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Society for Clinical Investigation, among other professional societies.In announcing Daley’s appointment, Faust and Garber jointly expressed their gratitude “to the many people across the Harvard medical community who offered their perspectives and counsel on the deanship — and on the important opportunities ahead for Harvard medicine, both on the Quad and across our peerless array of affiliated institutions. We owe special thanks to the members of the search advisory committee, who came together across the preclinical departments, the affiliates, and the larger University to help us arrive at an excellent outcome.”Faust and Garber recognized and thanked Barbara J. McNeil, the Ridley Watts Professor of Health Care Policy and professor of radiology at HMS, who became acting dean of the Faculty of Medicine on Aug. 1.In addition, they renewed their gratitude to Jeffrey S. Flier, who stepped down as dean on July 31 after nine years of distinguished leadership. “In a domain energized by the interplay of scientific rigor, innovative thinking, and humane concern for others,” Faust said when Flier first announced his plans, “Jeff has not only affirmed those qualities but embodied them.”“Harvard Medical School is the epicenter of biomedical research, a revered alma mater to innovators in science and medicine, a magnet for talent, and the home to many scientific and clinical firsts,” said Flier. “George Daley embodies the spirit and the values of this institution. He is a consummate physician-scientist, a passionate researcher, and a clinician known for his empathy and acumen, a beloved teacher and a proven leader. He is perfectly suited to lead HMS in the next phase of its quest to generate new knowledge and alleviate human suffering.” George Q. Daley, an internationally recognized leader in stem cell science and cancer biology and a longtime member of the Harvard Medical School (HMS) faculty who spans the fields of basic science and clinical medicine, will become the next dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Harvard President Drew Faust and Provost Alan Garber announced today.A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School with a Ph.D. in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Daley currently serves as professor of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology and as the Robert A. Stranahan Professor of Pediatrics at HMS, as well as director of the Stem Cell Transplantation Program at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He will take up his new duties on Jan. 1, 2017.“George Daley is an eminent scientist, a dedicated educator, an adept bridge-builder, a compelling advocate for scientific discovery, and a person of remarkable leadership qualities and thoughtful judgment,” said Faust in announcing the appointment. “From his work at the forefront of basic science to his focus on combating disease, from his role in developing international guidelines for stem cell research to his activities at the crossroads of medicine and biotechnology, he brings to all that he does an energetic and imaginative commitment to advancing discovery and improving lives.”Said Daley: “I am honored to have been asked by President Faust and Provost Garber to serve as dean. The people across the Harvard medical community embody one of the world’s great resources for broadening scientific understanding and realizing medicine’s promise to enhance the quality and longevity of people’s lives. I feel humbled by the prospect of leading so talented a community with so essential a mission — a community whose dynamism, growing diversity, and shared concern for the well-being of others are a deep source of strength. It will be a singular privilege to work with people across the Quad, our extraordinary affiliates, and the University to sustain and elevate Harvard’s leadership in academic medicine.”Added Garber: “George Daley knows Harvard, he knows our affiliated hospitals and research institutes, and he fully appreciates the Harvard medical community’s vital role in shaping the future of biomedical science and education at a time of transformative changes in medicine and the life sciences. He also understands the challenges facing our healthcare system and the importance of assuring care for those most in need. He is a remarkable scientist and an equally remarkable person, as humane and collegial as he is intelligent and accomplished. I am confident he will do an outstanding job leading Harvard medicine forward.”last_img read more

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Rent-A-Text arrives at Saint Mary’s bookstore

first_imgSaint Mary’s students took advantage of the new textbook rental program at Shaheen Bookstore, which was acquired by Follett Higher Education Group on Oct. 20. Thirty-six percent of students rented textbooks through the Rent-A-Text program, which accounted for 18 percent of the Bookstore’s total sales for the semester, Jim O’Connor, a regional manager at Follett, said. Notre Dame, which started the same program last semester, had a similar success rate, with 25 percent of students renting their texts. O’Connor said Saint Mary’s also has an increase in used texts. “With the introduction of this initiative along with a tremendous increase in the availability of used textbooks resulted in 41 percent of the SMC student purchases at greatly reduced costs as compared to a new textbook price,” O’Connor said. O’Connor said renting texts allows students to spend less for a semesters worth of books. “The Rent-A-Text program offers another cost savings alternative to the students,” O’Connor said. “The greatest advantage is the lowering of the upfront expenditure by students for the purchase of their course required materials. Renting a textbook will result in a savings of over 50 percent as compared to the cost of a new textbook.” Students who would like to rent books can either do so at the Bookstore, pre-register online at rent-a-text.com or do an express registration at the time of their first rental transaction, O’Connor said. “All that is required is that the student is over the age of 18, have a valid government issued ID and a credit card for collateral,” O’Connor said. “The actual transaction may be tendered utilizing cash, check, credit card or student charge. The collateral is only utilized in the event of a non-return.” Students wishing to purchase books they had rented can do so at any time, O’Connor said. He said there are no disadvantages to the program as long as students return the books at the end of the semester. “The failure to return will result in a full charge for the book plus penalties since that rental book will need to be replaced to ensure inventory of that title is available for rent for an upcoming term by other students,” O’Connor said. According to O’Connor, not every textbook in the library is available for rent in the bookstore, but there is a large database from which students may choose. “Since the Shaheen Bookstore is part of the Follett Higher Education network a large national data base of rental eligible titles is immediately available,” O’Connor said. “A faculty member may visit rent-a-text.com to view this national list as they are determining a selection for a future term.” O’Connor said there is a local rental list that is available if a book is being used for multiple terms. “A local rental title must meet certain criteria. The Store Manager will work closely with the faculty to identify potential additions to the national list,” he said. Junior biology major Krystal Holtcamp said she rented her books this semester to help curb costs. “I thought it was a really good option to be able to rent books especially me as a science major it’s very helpful because my books are so expensive,” she said. Holtcamp said it was a simple process. “I had a great experience,” she said. “All I had to do was show them my ID and they had it ready for me.”last_img read more

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Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs discusses the future of art in northeast Michigan

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisALPENA, MICH — The Michigan Council of Arts and Cultural Affairs made a visit to Alpena today to discuss the future of the arts on the sunrise side.The group brainstormed ways to further arts appreciation in the community, and how to keep young people engaged. Director of the council, Alison Watson, says the organization has to overcome two main challenges to help them better serve the community.“I think it’s two prongs, right? One is making sure that we’re providing funding for arts and cultural based organizations so they can continue the work that they do, and the other piece is that messaging. That the arts and culture is not for a certain type of person, a certain group of people: that it’s everybody. That we all connected and engage in this creative process, and that culture is just an everyday piece of our lives.”Executive Director of Art in the Loft, Justin Christensen – Cooper, says with the help of the Arts Council, he expects more diversity and youth engagement to consume the arts in northeast Michigan.“So a couple things that I really saw [today] were just the impact that we can get with our youth. How can we get the youth involved in our arts programming, how can we tap into that generation to make sure that really the arts are in good hands after we’re long and done with our jobs and so we can keep going on with places like Thunder Bay Theatre and Art in the Loft, things like that? And also just the inclusion of diversity as well. We need to have those marginalized groups incorporated in what we’re doing, and I think Alpena strives for that, and wants that, and needs that, and I think that all happens through arts organizations such as ourselves or state agencies like MCACA. “AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: Art, Art in the Loft, Arts, CULTURAL AFFAIRS, CULTURE, MCACAContinue ReadingPrevious Alpena and Rogers City advance to FIRST Robotics state championship tomorrowNext Photo of the Day for Tuesday, April 9last_img read more

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NFL fans want Rex Ryan to apologize for inexplicably calling Amari Cooper a ‘turd’

first_img“It comes back down to, how many guys are really difference makers? That is who you pay the top of the market to,” the executive said. “I’m sorry, Amari Cooper helps, but he does not tilt the field. He has not shown up consistently.”Reacting to this, Ryan ended up calling Cooper a “turd.”NFL DRAFT: 2-round mock | Top 100 prospects”[Amari Cooper] is the biggest disappearing act in the National Football League,” Ryan said. “He doesn’t show up on the road. He doesn’t show up against — when the competition’s good, when he goes up against a top corner, this guy disappears. There’s only one time I can remember in recent memory on elite receivers and disappearing acts like Amari Cooper. That was a kid the Raiders had a few years, oh that’s right, that was Amari Cooper. This is who he is. And then he doesn’t love football. Hell with it, he stops his routes, he does all of this. I wouldn’t have paid this turd. No way in hell. No way in hell would I have paid this guy.”Ryan added the Cowboys “made a huge mistake” bringing Cooper back.MORE: The strangest moments in NFL Draft historyThese are surprisingly strong words from Ryan, especially considering the season Cooper just had. In his first full season with Dallas, Cooper finished with 79 receptions for 1,189 yards and eight touchdowns. Ryan does have a strong point in Saying Cooper “doesn’t show up on the road.” Cooper finished with 869 yards in home games and just 320 yards in road games this past season. Amari Cooper signed a five-year, $100 million contract extension with the Cowboys last month, and former coach Rex Ryan doesn’t agree with Dallas’ decision.Speaking Friday morning on ESPN’s “Get Up,” Ryan laid into Cooper and the Cowboys for committing big money to the receiver. Ryan was reacting to an anonymous NFL executive’s quote in The Athletic that provided some criticism of the contract. Still, calling Cooper a “turd” seems like a low blow from someone who used to coach NFL players. And many football fans and analysts feel that way as well.UPDATE: ESPN brought Ryan back out later in the day to address his comments. He stands by his general assessment that the Cowboys shouldn’t have paid Cooper as much as they did. But he did backtrack his use of the word “turd” when describing Cooper.Rex Ryan joined @SportsCenter to clarify his earlier comments: pic.twitter.com/awB44JnETd— Get Up (@GetUpESPN) April 3, 2020″But what I added at the end of that, I want to apologize to Amari,” Ryan said. “And hopefully he accepts my apology.”What has Amari Cooper done to deserve this personal attack? He’s a hard worker, played through injuries, and is a good teammate. Rex Ryan should apologize.— Ian Rapoport (@RapSheet) April 3, 2020Not quite sure I would have described this young man that way. Always known him to be a good guy, quiet, who goes about his business without being disruptive or problematic— Steve Wyche (@wyche89) April 3, 2020This is wrong and over the line. You can be critical. But Cooper is a class act. Played through injuries all last season. Had the two most productive years of his career in Dallas. It is wrong and classless to call him a turd. https://t.co/Y3ZM5bt1jY— Clarence Hill Jr (@clarencehilljr) April 3, 2020″Turd…”He’s getting paid for this “analysis”? https://t.co/hPiTAcGotz— Patrik [No C] Walker (@VoiceOfTheStar) April 3, 2020Rex Ryan shouldn’t be calling any player a “turd” especially on national TV. Other than that he wasn’t wrong in his Amari Cooper evaluation.— Fallon (@FallonSmithTV) April 3, 2020This is embarrassing on a lot of levels. https://t.co/gASE5QzuFq— Roy White III (@RDubThree) April 3, 2020Take note of something — the reporters who are regularly in the Cowboys locker room, and interact with Amari Cooper on the regular… are all coming to his defense.Should tell you all you need to know about who Amari Cooper is as a man (and about how asinine Rex’s comment was).— Mike Leslie (@MikeLeslieWFAA) April 3, 2020Coop is easily one of the most thoughtful & respectful guys that’s come through the Cowboys’ locker room in the last decade, too. After the 4th & 9 fiasco, he stood at his locker and answered everyone who wanted to talk about it.What a tool bag thing to say 🙄— David Helman (@HelmanDC) April 3, 2020Amari Cooper was professional, honest and made himself available when he hurt and healthy. He took criticism like a pro and praise like a pro.— Calvin Watkins (@calvinwatkins) April 3, 2020I really wish people could understand the kind of pain Amari Cooper played through last season.Maybe then they could appreciate him so more.— Marcus Mosher (@Marcus_Mosher) April 3, 2020last_img read more

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Elks show strength at provincial championships

first_imgCoach Richard Stickel was happy with the results.   “The level of competition was strong throughout the whole province and the skaters who managed to medal were very deserving.” 13 skaters have qualified to compete at the Canadian Long Track Championships, which will take place in Fort St. John February 11 and 12. The qualifiers are listed below:- Advertisement – Renee Kalkman Eryn Stickel Sarah Graham Theresa Martins Rachel Kalkman Mikayla Guenther Kelsey Johnson Jamie Lee Colton Johnson Ben Maxfield Ben Van Spronsen Connor Johnson Raistlin Van Spronsenlast_img

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Money Monday

first_imgBy Barbara O’NeillRetirement ceremony for Air Force Maj. Gen. Donald Fick on June 21, 2012.What is the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) contribution limit for Thrift Saving Plan (TSP) contributions?In 2013, the IRS increased the contribution limit by $500. Service members under the age of 50 are allowed to contribute up to $17,500 in tax-deferred savings to the TSP for the year 2013. In 2012, the contribution limit was $17,000. Service members age 50 and older can contribute an additional $5,500 in catch-up contributions for the year 2013 for a total of $23,000.For more information , refer to TSP: Contribution Limits.Browse more military personal finance webinars and articles answered by experts.Follow Dr. O’Neill on Twitter!This post was published on the Military Families Learning Network Blog on March 4, 2013.last_img read more

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15 days agoHoward announced as Everton’s first USA ambassador

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Howard announced as Everton’s first USA ambassadorby Paul Vegas15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveRetired goalkeeper Tim Howard has been announced as Everton’s first ambassador in the USA.Howard will make his first appearance in his new role in Austin, Texas, later this month with fans being invited to attend an exclusive event with the American on Saturday, 26, October, reports the Liverpool Echo.Howard will also represent Everton at NBC’s Premier League Mornings Live earlier on the same day for the Blues’ league encounter with Brighton & Hove Albion.The former Blues man made a record 354 Premier League appearances during a 10-year stint at Goodison Park with his last game coming in 2016.The 40-year-old officially retired from professional football on Sunday, playing his last game for Colorado Rapids in the MLS. last_img read more

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Rivals Has Added 2 Sixth-Graders To Its Football Recruiting Database

first_imgSixth-grade phenom Daron Bryden gets a Rivals profile.It’s no secret that college football coaches are pursuing recruits at younger and younger ages. But should there be an age that’s considered too young? This week, Rivals.com has added two sixth-grade players to its database. One – Daron Bryden – is a 5-foot-2, 105-pound quarterback. The other – Tyson Thornton – is a 5-foot-11, 170-pound running back. News of their inclusion on the site has been making the rounds.Rivals announces it will now monitor 6th graders for football (H/T @JeffDLowe, @USATODAYsports) pic.twitter.com/BIElTQ1Z7Q— Darren Rovell (@darrenrovell) February 16, 2015If you’re wondering what film of a sixth-grade football star looks like, well, here you go. Bryden’s father has been campaigning for his son for years.It’ll be interesting to see if either actually winds up playing collegiate football in the end.last_img read more

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Miami Football: Report: 4-Star 2017 WR Kemore Gamble Commits To Miami

first_imgKemore Gable commits to Miami.Twitter/@kemoregamble15According to a report by 247Sports’ Ryan Bartow, Al Golden has added yet another top player to the 2017 class, in four-star receiver Kemore Gamble.Breaking: 4-star WR Kemore Gamble commits to #Miami. @kemoregamble15 @jcshurburtt— Ryan Bartow (@RyanBartow) June 17, 2015Gamble, a Miami native, is listed a 6-foot-3, 200 pounds. His commitment comes after camping at Miami back on June 6. He also holds offers from Louisville, Rutgers, Syracuse, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and others.With this commitment, Miami has eight players in its 2017 class, which currently ranks third nationally.last_img

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