New York man convicted of selling sharks on the internet

first_imgizanbar/iStockBy AARON KATERSKY, ABC News(LAGRANGE, N.Y.) — The only water that runs through New York’s Dutchess County is the Hudson River, known for Northern Pike, Atlantic Sturgeon and the occasional odd whale. So authorities became curious when they learned a Dutchess County man was selling sharks.It turned out that Joshua Seguine had been keeping live sharks in a pool at his home and offering them for sale on the internet.Seguine, 40, was convicted Wednesday in LaGrange, New York, of illegal trafficking and ordered to pay a $5,000 fine. He pleaded not guilty.“The tide has turned for Joshua Seguine, who was convicted and held accountable for his unlawful acts,” said New York Attorney General Letitia James. “We will not tolerate anyone who preys on protected species to line their pockets.”According to the New York attorney general’s office, Seguine admitted he was transporting the sharks to New York, where he intended to sell them, and that he possessed additional live sharks at his house, offered for sale on the website MonsterFishKeepers.com.State environmental conservation officers, accompanied by biologists from the Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead and the Wildlife Conservation Society’s New York Aquarium at Coney Island, conducted a search and discovered an above-ground pool in his house that contained seven live sharks.The sharks were subsequently identified as sandbar sharks, the possession of which is prohibited by New York law without a special license. The search also uncovered two dead leopard sharks, one dead hammerhead shark and the snout of a smalltooth sawfish, an endangered species, according to the state Department of Environmental Conservation.Biologists from the two aquariums assessed the sharks and transferred them to the Riverhead facility. The sharks were subsequently moved to the New York Aquarium at Coney Island, according to the state Department of Environmental Conservation.“I applaud the work of our environmental conservation police officers, who spearheaded the investigation that resulted in Joshua Seguine being brought to justice,” said Basil Seggos, Department of Environmental Conservation commissioner.“It is critical that we work to protect endangered species that are taken from their natural habitats and sold for profit,” he said.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Nurse wins compensation for latex allergy

first_imgNurse wins compensation for latex allergyOn 1 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today An NHS nurse who had to give up her career after developing an allergy tolatex gloves was awarded unspecified damages in December last year in anout-of-court settlement. Rosemary Newton worked as a fertility specialist in the assisted conceptionunit of Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. She developed an allergy to latex after using up to 15 pairs of the gloves aday. Newton blamed the trust for failing to carry out a proper risk assessment onthe issue. The hospital has since overhauled its procedures, including setting up aglove working group, banning the use of powdered gloves – which are blamed forcausing such allergies – setting up a policy to better manage latex allergy andrunning latex awareness days. A report by the TUC in August last year estimated some 100,000 NHS staffcould be at risk and trusts were failing to do enough to provide alternatives. Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Received, but understood?

first_imgReceived, but understood?On 1 Jul 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Howard Popeck reviews the online assessment tool Cognisco Series-300Litigation from external sources or disgruntled employees is on theincrease. To merely claim that the litigant had been presented with the rules,safety procedures, employment guidelines, HR policies, and so on is no longer acredible defence. The most commonly asked question in court is: “Yes, buthow do you know that they understood the information they were presentedwith?” Onerous board-level responsibilities Consider the implications of increased legal responsibility placed on boarddirectors by compliance regulations where the current blurred distinctionbetween information and knowledge is likely to come under increasingly rigorousscrutiny. Two global companies keen to identify what their staff actually understandabout job-related information are working with the UK-based HR data analysisfirm Cognisco, using its Cognisco Series-300 which provides online assessmentand detailed ongoing analysis of individual employees’ levels of understanding.Avoiding lucky guesses Cognisco’s claimed raison d’etre is that it is able to identify employeeswho meet or exceed a competence benchmark primarily through memory(questionable understanding), against those who achieve similar or bettergrades by demonstrating sufficient understanding, for example, with onlylimited reliance on memory. Moreover, it spots the ‘lucky bluffers’, who givethe correct, but guessed answers, it claims. Where is the evidence? At first sight Cognisco’s claims appear extravagant. Yet senior HR people attwo giant organisations, Interbrew (37,000 people worldwide) and TomsConfectionery (£110m turnover) believe the UK findings might ultimatelyinfluence their entire global HR policies. Interbrew UK uses it to provide online assessments within its sales functioncompetency framework, providing accurate measurements of the levels ofunderstanding by senior level sales managers and directors. This fits withinthe early stages of a rolling strategy to harmonise competencies on a globalbasis for Interbrew. In the global arena, accessibility and ease of use ofthese types of systems is an important factor. The Cognisco tool has enabled senior Interbrew managers and directors tofocus on their development needs within a well-structured competency framework.For individuals, this means they are able to focus and target their developmentwhere it really matters. Promotion policies re-evaluated Even more radical are the conclusions drawn by Toms after an intriguingapplication of Series-300. These conclusions, if they gain widespread acceptance,are set to overturn at least one long-held irrational HR belief regardingremuneration negotiations and promotion policies. Toms’ HR director Alan Best says: “I wanted an objective reply to thechallenge we’ve all heard far too often – “I’ve been here 20 years and I’mthe most experienced one here.” Cognisco’s Series-300 demonstrated that,sadly, this can be one year’s experience simply repeated 20 times!” Duty of Care The British Army has expressed an interest in evaluating whether officerstruly understand what is meant by Duty of Care via Series-300 onlineassessments. Its concern is that too many court martials are failing becauseofficers do not sufficiently understand the basis on which a charge can bebrought. According to Cognisco, discussions are under way with two regionalhealth trusts regarding objective assessment of managers’ understanding ofrace, gender and paternity issues. However, Cognisco is at pains to point out that Series-300 is not a tool fortrapping the unwary. “It is not 1984 revisited. It seeks to identify theexceptionally competent too,” it says. According to Sam Burton, SubaruUK’s managing director commenting on a successful application of Series-300across its UK dealer network, “the whole point is not to catch people out,but to improve skills.” A glimpse over the HR horizon perhaps? So are we witnessing the start of an HR revolution where tests decide whoshould advance? Will the driving force be proven merit rather than longevity?The indications are that increasing numbers of HR managers are demanding asounder basis for making certain global decisions. Faced with this, CogniscoSeries-300 may be the preferred choice. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Statutory guidance: The National Health Service Litigation Authority Directions 2019

first_imgThe National Health Service Litigation Authority (Arrangements for the Existing Liabilities Scheme) Directions 2019 allow the NHS Litigation Authority to carry out the Secretary of State’s governance and other responsibilities under the contractual arrangements entered into by the Secretary of State with the Medical Protection Society.The NHS Litigation Authority operates under the name of NHS Resolution.These directions came into force on 3 April 2019.last_img

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Dead & Company Will Be Profiled On CBS’s ‘Sunday Morning’

first_imgThis Sunday looks to be quite the big day for Dead & Company. The band will not only make their live debut at Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival that evening, but they’ve also shot a profile piece that will air on the long running CBS program, Sunday Morning. Dead & Company kicks off their exciting summer tour tomorrow night, June 10th, at the PNC Music Pavilion in Charlotte, NC.last_img

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GRiZ To The People: ‘Good Will Prevail’ [Album Stream/Review]

first_imgIn light of rising tensions across the globe, GRiZ’s most recent musical message is to embrace the faith that Good Will Prevail. The mastermind, Grant Kwiecinski formally, has always encouraged the doctrine of showing love and spreading love, and this fifth studio album is a soulful gospel for the choir. With an excellent blend of spirit-lifting funk and head-banging bass, GRiZ continues to radiate positivity from his core – and out his sax!Check out the full stream here and read the review below.Haunting vocals by Eric Krasno, along with a deep, spacey drop and piercing horn, make for an aptly named opening track, “Wicked.” The rock ‘n roll heavy banger, “Can’t Hold Me Down,” has been on repeat since its release last month – for GRiZFam at least – and features Tash Neal of the London Souls. If your knees aren’t bottoming out, you’re doing it wrong. “My Friends and I” is an instant favorite, with Chicago’s Prob Cause spitting lyrics that are funk nasty fresh. Be warned: the basslines in this track will straight up slice and dice you!Ida Hawk, unsurprisingly (yet wonderfully), was tapped in for “I Don’t Mind,” along with Sunsquabi and Artifakts, who complete the horn-filled, jammy tune. Other familiar voices include Leo Napier, who delivers strong lyrical content in “Before I Go,” and Muzzy Bear, whose “whoas” and electric guitar sing beautifully in “Rather Be Free.” Ganja-praising sing-along, “Good Times Roll,” is as epic as you’d expect from a collaboration with Big Gigantic, but with the original release being back in 2015, this track now feels like a bundle of warm funkin memories.Cherub’s playful influence is evident in the edgy “PS GFY,” which was originally written about GRiZ’ brother’s former love. It’s a great middle-finger-in-the-air anthem – and probably my ex-boyfriend’s new favorite song. On a lighter note, “Feelin Fine” is a nice slow jam fit for a midnight cruise in the moonlight. “What We’ve Become” will also keep you lifted, with poppy vocals from Cory Enemy and Nat Dunn, and some sultry sax to complement. The final, dreamy track, “Driftin,” featuring Son Little, will leave you sailing real far away.Enveloped in these feel-good vibes, it’s easy to forget the troubles of the world. Music, in general, provides these brief releases, and for that, and to GRiZ, we are thankful. The upcoming supporting tour, which kicks off next week at Red Rocks, will surely make a believer in all of us. Good Will Prevail!last_img read more

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Watch Out Purists, High Definition Vinyl Is Coming Soon

first_imgVinyl records may be an old-school form of technology, but that doesn’t mean more advancements aren’t on the horizon. In particular, it looks like “high definition” vinyl is about to give the purists something new to fawn over (or even complain about).Pitchfork reports that a 2016 European patent filing describes a new way to create vinyl records that have higher audio fidelity, longer playing times, and a louder volume than their standard definition counterparts. Furthermore, an Austrian startup called Rebeat Innovation just received $4.8 million in funding to bring the technology to market, and the company believes the new HD vinyl could be available as early as 2019.Rebeat Innovation founder and CEO Günter Liobl explained that the promising tech involves digitally converting the audio to a three-dimensional topographic map. That map is then inscribed onto the “stamper” (using lasers, of course), which stamps the grooves into the vinyl. Since the records are able to be made more precisely and with less loss of audio information, HD vinyl LPs can have up to 30% longer playing times, 30% higher amplitude, and more exact sound reproduction. Additionally, the manufacturing process requires fewer chemicals than traditional vinyl manufacturing, and the HD LPs can still be played on a normal record player.“Our goal is to officially present our test stampers at the Making Vinyl conference in October,” Loibl told Pitchfork. “It will take another eight months to do all the fine adjustments. So by summer 2019 we shall see the first HD vinyls in the stores.”Loibl and the Rebeat team may have a real money maker on their hands with this one. After all, while CDs are clearly going the way of the dodo, vinyl records sales recently hit a 25-year high, turning a once-dead medium into a billion dollar industry (and a more reliable cash cow than increasingly-popular-yet-dubiously-profitable music streaming services).last_img read more

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Finalists announced for Innovations in American Government Award

first_img Read Full Story Today, the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government announced four finalists from across the country for its 2020 Innovations in American Government Award. Honorees include the City University of New York’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs, the city of Philadelphia’s BenePhilly program, the Massachusetts Pathways to Economic Advancement Project, and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Business Relations Program.For over 30 years, the Innovations Award has recognized public-sector programs that make the American government, at all levels, more efficient, creative, and effective at addressing social problems and providing services to the public. This year the award program specifically sought out exemplary models of government innovation addressing and promoting economic opportunity for all.Finalist Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Business Relations Program established a business relations program to work throughout the state to promote and support the hiring of individuals with disabilitiesSelected by a team of policy experts, researchers, and practitioners; the finalists were chosen for their novelty, effectiveness, significance, and transferability, as well as their impact on issues of economic and social mobility, inequity, and stratification. “These four programs demonstrate that the spirit of innovation is alive and well across government in the United States,” said Stephen Goldsmith, the Daniel Paul Professor of Practice in Government at Harvard Kennedy School and the director of the Innovations in American Government Program at the Ash Center. “By reimagining how government delivers services, these our finalists serve as important examples of the role that government can play in strengthening economic opportunity for all Americans.”Representatives from each finalist program will give presentations before the National Selection Committee of the Innovations in American Government Awards on March 12 in Cambridge, with the winner to be announced later this year. Recordings of the presentations will be released in the coming month.last_img read more

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GreeNDot wins award, prepares changes for second year

first_imgMore than 100 students went through GreeNDot’s bystander training in its first year. Now, just starting its second year, the violence prevention initiative will be honored at Saturday’s football game against Nevada as one of the six organizations awarded the Presidential Team Irish Award.“I think two of the things that make GreeNDot remarkable for our campus is its cross-campus collaboration — you have faculty, staff and students all working in a way that’s different from every other violence prevention initiative I’ve ever been part of — and its impact on our campus has been really amazing,” Christine Caron Gebhardt, director of the Gender Relations Center (GRC), said. “People have really taken to the message, I think, because it’s very straightforward. It’s something people can get their hands on and it’s very practical.”The Presidential Team Irish Award recognizes a department as a group of people that live out core values of the University and do it in such a way that it impacts the entire University, according to the website for the Office of Human Resources. GreeNDot is a “campus-wide initiative for violence prevention” that works by promoting culture change about violence and how everyone does their part. “What we like about GreeNDot is that it takes a large issues like sexual assault, or stalking or domestic dating violence and breaks it into strategies that a person can do in their everyday life and that is suited to who they are so that all of the individual efforts and individual choices to do green dots have an overall impact of changing Notre Dame’s culture, as well as preventing violence from happening here,” Gebhardt said. She said the main service GreeNDot offers is bystander training, which encourages participants to “do their part” to prevent violence with the “3 Ds”: delegate, distract and direct. Over 300 people have expressed interest in being bystander trained this year, she said. The GRC plans on holding six trainings this year. “This school year, we’d like to have over 500 people to be trained,” Gebhardt said. “We have a number of overview speeches that we’d like to make sure that we reach. We are trying to reach more faculty because we feel like faculty can be one of the strongest voices.” The training teaches participants about “red dots,” or individual decisions that contribute to a culture of violence, and how to replace them with “green dots,” or individual decisions that promote change in this culture.“I think one of the most powerful parts of the training is the steps that a predator takes in order to find someone to prey upon,” she said. “I think it’s very intense, but it also helps people understand that when they see a situation playing out, while it may seem harmless, there’s actually an intentionality behind it that, as you see those steps, you see how you as a bystander may be able to intervene either before something happens, but also remind people that, regrettably, there are times that we can’t, but how they can intervene after and take care of the person who’s been harmed.”With the “strong momentum” from last year, Gebhardt said the GRC is hopeful about GreeNDot’s second year, especially with some of the changes being introduced. “One of the key things we recognize is really having students be more directly involved in the implementation, so we set up the student advisory committee,” she said. “I think that’s one of our biggest initiatives this year. Ultimately, we want this to be something the students feel ownership of and the students can shape it to what it needs to be for Notre Dame, not just for this year, but for the long-term future.” Senior Mary Kate Healey, one of the members of the new student committee and who is working on the social marketing subcommittee, said the students will help with advocacy and awareness. “You need to have students involved in order to make a campaign for students,” she said. “We’re the voice of the student body for the adults.” Healey was pulled in because of her previous work with Campus Ministry; she said other student council members were pulled from athletics, student government, etc.“If we’re going to say that we’re a community or a family and then acts of violence happens between students, there’s clearly something wrong there,” Healey said. “Having people from Campus Ministry brings that perspective, as well as letting the organization know that, as a faith-based institution, we’re not okay with what’s happening.”In addition to introducing the student advisory committee, Gebhardt said the GRC is also adding to their promotional plan for the program. “Ultimately, we’d like to get bystander stories out to people, because we’re hearing about the great ways in which people have used GreeNDot, and we want to get those stories out to other people so that folks can see that doing a green dot, while it’s courageous, may not be as hard as folks think it is,” she said. “If we can just have people share their stories, we can take that collection of green dots and show how we’re actually changing Notre Dame’s culture.“That’s really the heart of GreeNDot, that every day we’re sending a message about what Notre Dame stands for.”  Tags: greeNDot, Notre Dame Student Government, student safetylast_img read more

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