KBC partners with AVGI to expand engineering simulation capabilities

first_imgUnder the collaboration, the Petro-SIM and COILSIM1D are integrated and data is exchanged to help refinery-petrochemical complexes maximise profitability Image: KBC intends to extend its engineering simulation capabilities to benefit oil refiners. Photo: Courtesy of Markus Naujoks from Pixabay. KBC, a UK-based software services provider, has announced the strategic partnership with AVGI, a simulation and optimization software provider for modeling olefin technologies.The collaboration is aimed at delivering capital efficient plant design and optimisation through end-to-end modeling of integrated oil refining, aromatics, and steam cracking complexes using advanced software solutions.KBC CEO Andy Howell said: “Integration of COILSIM1D with Petro-SIM will open up a wide range of steady state, online and offline simulation opportunities. Integrated models supporting dynamic real-time optimization will further mitigate the risk in transitioning to more petrochemicals in the product slate.”KBC intends to extend its engineering simulation capabilitiesAccording to the company, the demand for petrochemicals is growing rapidly, and the International Energy Agency predicts that petrochemicals would occupy more than one third of the growth in oil demand by 2030, and approximately half by 2050.In addition, using reactor simulations for feedstocks, furnace and coil geometries, and operating conditions are expected to optimise yield and energy.Under the collaboration, the integration and data exchange between Petro-SIM and COILSIM1D would enable integrated refinery-petrochemical complexes to maximise their profitability.Petro-SIM is a process simulator that combines data and science through a digital framework which is not only scalable but also accessible to offer the capability to solve problems in real time.COILSIM1D is a simulation and optimisation software for the ethylene industry. It is designed to increase the profitability of steam crackers and optimising the process, through accurate reactor simulations for a range of feedstocks, furnace and coil geometries, and operating conditions.AVGI managing director Kevin Van Geem said: “Through our research capabilities with Ghent University, we are continuing our extensive research into steam cracking technologies. We value this new partnership with KBC for expanding industry access to our know-how and intellectual property.“We know a large proportion of the oil refining industry get a lot of benefit from KBC’s Petro-SIM. Its interoperability with COILSIM1D and use in end-to-end simulation for petrochemicals will unlock even more value for them.”last_img read more

Read More »

SVA sells 90% of lots

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » SVA sells 90% of lots previous nextAgencies & PeopleSVA sells 90% of lotsThe Negotiator21st May 20180885 Views SVA Property Auctions, Scotland’s independent property auction company, sold 90 per cent of the auction lots at its March auction raising £4 million from 31 lots.Lots for sale by the Scottish Government, included a new housing development with land at Fairways Drive in Dunoon.The lot, an incomplete development of six flats, two houses and around 1.8 acres of land, sold for £450,000, almost double the guide price. Bought by a building company, it is expected that the flats and houses will be completed for sale, followed by the building of new homes on the rest of the site.The March auction was one of SVA Property Auctions largest ever auctions. Shaun Vigers, auctioneer, said, “We had to postpone this auction because of the snow disruption and I am grateful to everyone who accommodated the change and turned out for the re-arranged auction in such large numbers.”SVA Property Auctions auction auction lots Scotland’s independent property auction company May 21, 2018The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Read More »

TPFG is first major multi-branch corporate to join Boomin

first_imgYet-to-launch portal challenger Boomin has signed up its first major multi-branch corporate and hinted that its huge advertising push due to start soon will give agents leverage when their other portal subscriptions come up for renegotiation.The Property Franchise Group, which operates 375 franchised branches across the UK including national brands Martin & Co and Ewemove, has signed up to the platform and secured founder member status for all its franchisees.This is a significant coup for Boomin. TPFG’s agents let some 32,000 properties a year and sell approximately 11,000, adding a huge potential inventory to its platform.So far Boomin has signed up small and medium-size regional agents with the exception of Hunters and Foxtons, who are comparable with TPFG by turnover and reach.“We are delighted to have partnered with Boomin,” says Gareth Samples (pictured), CEO of The Property Franchise Group.“The customer focused proposition is compelling and a major leap forward from anything else currently in the space; we believe it could redefine the way portals are viewed by consumers.”Boomin has also claimed that it will provide “provide them with a fairer and more balanced playing field when negotiating the best venue to advertise for them and their customers,” it says.It co-founder Michael Bruce adds (left): “The new tools on our platform such as Sneak Peak, Matchmaker and 24/7 will support their digital marketing strategy and alongside Property Playground will enable their franchisees to earn new and long term revenue streams.”Agents joining Boomin can use it until January 2022 for free.Boomin Gareth Samples Martin & Co Michael Bruce TPFG EweMove November 10, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » TPFG is first major multi-branch corporate to join Boomin previous nextAgencies & PeopleTPFG is first major multi-branch corporate to join BoominMartin & Co and its Ewemove, CJ Hole, Whitegates, Ellis & Co and Parkers stablemates at TPFG are to all feature on the portal when it launches.Nigel Lewis10th November 20200845 Viewslast_img read more

Read More »

Borderland Music Festival Adds Oteil Burbridge & Friends To Inaugural Lineup

first_img[H/T JamBase] Borderland Music + Arts Festival, a new two-day event set to take place on September 22nd and 23rd at Knox Farm State Park in East Aurora, New York, has announced an exciting addition to their inaugural artist lineup. Oteil & Friends, the copiously talented solo project from Dead & Company bassist Oteil Burbridge, will take the stage at the new festival. For this Oteil & Friends performance, Oteil has tapped Scott Metzger (Joe Russo’s Almost Dead), John Kimock (Mike Gordon Band), John Kadlecik (FURTHUR/Dark Star Orchestra), and his brother, Kofi Burbridge (Tedeschi Trucks Band).Oteil Burbridge Gathers His Talented “Friends” For A Pair Of Standout Sunday Sets At The Peach [Full Videos]After debuting the project with a brief tour late last year coinciding with the release of his latest studio album, Water in the Desert, Oteil has added a handful of festival appearances to his Friends’ schedule. With Dead & Company taking the rest of the year off the road while Bob Weir mounts his first-ever tour with new trio Bob Weir and Wolf Bros, we hope this is the first of many Oteil & Friends dates that will pop up to fill that timeframe. For now, we can be excited about one more appearance at Borderland. For a full list of Oteil’s various upcoming performances, head to his website.Burbridge and company join an already-solid Borderland artist roster that includes The Revivalists, John Oates & The Good Road Band, Sam Roberts Band, Dr. Dog, Margo Price, The Infamous Stringdusters, Sam Bush Band, The Barr Brothers, Fruition, Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, Priscilla Renea, Upstate Rubdown, Folkfaces, PA Line, Leroy Townes Band, The Observers, and more to be announced.Tickets for Borderland Music + Arts Festival are available now. For more information, or to grab your passes today, head to the festival website.Borderland Music + Arts Festival Initial Lineup Announcement Videolast_img read more

Read More »

Mountain Medicine Part 5: Labyrinth

first_imgAppalachian Ecotherapy and Why We Need it Now At the center of the labyrinth, I searched for a stone to represent what I wanted to fill the void I’d created by leaving my pain behind. It wasn’t difficult. From the very top I plucked a smooth blue stone, clearly worn down after a millennia of water erosion. A river stone, like the ones my father and I would search for when we’d skip rocks on the lake. “Life’s not fair, kiddo.” “It’s not fair.” As a science geek I’ve always been skeptical of things I cannot explain, and I’d never really given much thought to the merits of sage smudging. Still, I was determined to take this exercise one hundred percent seriously and, truth be told, something about the whole affair felt ceremonial. Official. (And, with a quick Google search after the exercise, I learned she was right.) With bits of sage tickling my nostrils, I took a deep breath. — Regret. Regret that I didn’t come see him on Father’s Day, the week before he died. He said he wasn’t feeling well, and didn’t want me to bother with the trip. I should have gone. I’d bought him a card with a drawing of three kids in the backseat of a van, dad in the front with a speech bubble that read, “Kids, remember when someone cuts you off, it’s okay to use your special finger!” Inside the card: “Thank you for teaching me the important things in life, Dad.”  He broke into a wide grin. “Yeah, just like that.”  Eventually, my list of things to do ran out. By then, it felt too late to grieve, inappropriate. I’d missed my window. In the stillness of everyday life, inconvenient emotions loomed in the foreground: anger, regret, sadness, confusion, fear, disappointment, resentment. And now I was finding them harder to ignore. In that moment I felt awkward and stupid. To me, all the stones looked basically the same. What made one better than another? It wasn’t logical, half of my brain yelled at me. Who cares what rock? Would it really make a difference? The other half of my brain berated me for being such a rigid square. Suspend the disbelief a little, why don’t you? My competing halves squabbled while my eyes scanned. When I returned to the room, I found the curtains drawn. Sweeping them to the side, I was accosted by the sight of my father completely naked on the hospital gurney, sending me backpedaling to sit outside the door. The nurses emerged to explain he had vomited on himself and needed his gown changed. As the father of three girls, the man had been painstakingly modest about nudity, and somehow, after twenty-seven years of success, I bungled it on the last day. Small indignities of watching someone you love die. Forty-eight sleepless hours in the ICU. I was getting dizzy from scanning doctors’ faces as they passed, hoping for liberation from the purgatory of not knowing. The nurses were cheerful, but they always were. It was put on, of course. How could anyone be cheerful in this place straddled between life and death? Patients groaned in agony behind pink, plastic curtains, every room full of alien instruments, wires, and tubes. He chuckled but gave me a subdued smile. “Me too, but someday I won’t be around.”  As a man with chronic road rage, he would have loved it. I’d planned to give it to him the next time I saw him, but I never got the chance. It burned with the rest of him at the crematorium. “My dad,” I told her. One step forward. But this didn’t take away all the horrible memories. Like cracking Pandora’s box, snippets of horror rushed to the forefront of my brain. When I agreed to try one of her therapeutic exercises, she asked me to think about what no longer serves me in my life. What is holding me back? “So what do you want to let go of?” she asked. For months after my father died, I buried myself in the busyness of death — making calls to relatives and the utility companies, negotiating with the funeral home, writing the obituary, designing memorial cards, transferring car titles at the DMV, yelling at the HOA for harassing me about mildew on the side of his house.  His tongue. The image of my father’s purple, swollen tongue came into my mind. Poking between his lips when they removed the ventilation tube, dark in contrast to his pallid, lifeless skin. My heart ached at the memory. I didn’t want to remember him that way. I pictured the image seeping like a toxin from my fingertips into the rock. One step forward. What did I want to release? No right or wrong answers, I reminded myself.  I held the blue pebble in my closed palm and pressed my fists into my pocket to warm my cracked, dry hands. Between my thumb and index finger, I rubbed its smooth surface like a prayer bead. And, in my own way, I prayed. — My lip poked out in a pout, as though this fact were his fault. He nudged my chin with his knuckle, lifting my face to meet his gaze. “At the end of the day, we’re all worm food, and that’s the circle of life.”  “Good,” Cheeks encouraged. “Trust your instinct, but think about it carefully.” — The nurses left me again. I was determined this time to maintain my post, listening to the rhythmic click and sigh as the respirator filled his lungs with air. The balloon pump kept his heart beating. IV bags perched on shiny chrome racks dripped drugs into his bloodstream. So many damn machines — I wasn’t sure how much man remained.  One of my first memories was through the bars of my baby sister’s crib. My mother had placed the three of us there while the EMTs hauled my father out of our apartment on a stretcher after his first heart attack. I was 4, he was 53.  “Now,” Cheeks instructed with a gentle voice, “Look around and choose a rock that represents what you want to release from your life. There isn’t a right or wrong answer.” Cheeks nodded and produced a box from which she retrieved a lighter and a bundle of dried sage. Despite five minutes of joint effort, we weren’t able to keep the lighter aflame against the wind. Undeterred, she held the sage to my nose and told me to inhale. It was a grounding exercise, she explained. An effort to engage my senses and prime my brain to be mindful and notice the sights, sounds, and smells of the forest. “Plus, it’s cleansing,” she added.  And with the wind whipping hair against my face, I crossed the threshold. The beeping of the EKG machines were testing the last remnants of my sanity. Chinese water torture in the form of sound, a shrill metronome marking the growing distance between myself and reality. In theory, it was a rather simple exercise. But I was out of my depth and pre-occupied with the execution. How fast should I walk? How does one walk and meditate at the same time? Should I close my eyes? “Just watch me,” I’d snapped. I stood, straightening my back, feeling the relief in my muscles, the tension in my shoulders melting with my newfound lightness.  Here, in the wind and quiet, I took a moment with that heavy rock and placed a hand over its surface. Cold, rough. “Goodbye,” I whispered.center_img For a moment I stood still and silent, cradling the rock to my chest. Icy air leeched into my lungs as I steadied my breath. It smelled faintly like Christmas, splintered branches bleeding their sweet, piney scent into the atmosphere. The staccato thrum of a woodpecker echoed from the distance.  And sitting in plain sight, there it was. The stone was large, asymmetrical, gray, and ugly. Squatting to lift it, I cradled it in my forearms like an infant. A fat one — somewhere around 15 pounds. With its shape so ungainly, I found it difficult to hold, resting it partially against my pelvis for stability. Something to represent all those icky emotions I’d been avoiding for over a year. This thing would be hell to carry — it was the one. At some point the beeping from the monitors indicated that his heart was racing. I looked over to the bed and his eyes met mine, opened for the first time since I arrived. He tried to speak, but the ventilation tube silenced his voice, his tongue swollen and purple from biting it when he hit the floor. His expression was one I’d never seen him wear: fear.  “My ticker’s just not very good,” he explained when I was older.  Learning to skip stones with Dad. I needed air, but I settled for nicotine. I stepped out for a punishing cigarette — smoked fast and burned hot. Maybe I needed it that way. Click here to read the whole article The sound of a jackhammer in the distance interrupted my thoughts, ricocheting inside my skull. Anger bubbled inside me. How unfair, I thought. How am I supposed to immerse myself in nature with all that damn noise? Life’s not fair, came my father’s voice. One of his favorite phrases.  Stepping over newly fallen trees, I trekked through the Edith J. Carrier Arboretum until I reached a clearing hidden by pines and lined with rocks. Carefully arranged, they formed a winding labyrinth for walking meditation. At the entry stood ecotherapist Pat Cheeks, who had arrived an hour before to clear fallen brush, collect litter, and tidy stones. We greeted each other and made small talk about last night’s crazy storm, soon circling back to the reason we were both standing out here in the cold. At age six, the notion that life wasn’t fair didn’t seem good enough to me. “I think you should be here forever,” I told him, crossing my arms. A year and a half later on a frigid February day, I braced myself against blustery gusts of air, kicking myself for forgetting my hat and scarf in my truck. A brutal windstorm had torn through the Shenandoah Valley the previous night, bowing the windows of my apartment to the point I thought they might crack. Though the storm had passed, today’s windchill made the 40 degree air feel closer to 25. When the doctor told us he was braindead with no possibility of recovery, my sister had reached for my hand. I shook my head ‘no,’ recoiling from human touch. I didn’t want to carry anyone else’s pain, I could barely manage my own. ’Bad sister’ flashed across my mind, though I’d long since apologized and been forgiven. Into the rock and one step forward. “Why not?” I demanded to know.  After her experiences with survivors of trauma, Cheeks found surprising solutions for pain management besides the use of medication. Asking burn patients to imagine their body covered with cool river water, for example, took away some of the heat and pain. Eventually, Cheeks opened her own small business, Natural Transitions, to help clients adjust to major life changes using nature as a healing tool. With gravel crunching beneath my feet, I let it all go. In the last few years of his life, we’d grown distant. I had become tired of his nagging, prodding, pushing me to get a career, make something more of myself. “What are you doing with your life, Sarah?” he’d asked me. “You can’t kick the can down the road forever.”  During my winding walk towards the center, I’d only heard the wind through dry branches and an occasional woodpecker. But now, the woods were alive with sounds of life that I’d been too preoccupied to notice — gentle chirps of female cardinals, returned by the more rambunctious twitter of the males. The rapid chip of the sparrow, the quick-fire, five-beat note of the Carolina wren. Squirrels skittered in helter skelter spirals around the trunks of oak trees, their barks and squeaks intermingling with birdsong. Even in winter when the world seemed shriveled and dead, life sprung from every tree hollow. Stone from center of labyrinthPhoto credit: Sarah Vogel By the time I reached the center of the labyrinth, my forearms and biceps were shaking from fatigue. I was ready to put it down. In a way, it felt more final than when they put my father’s remains in the ground. At the funeral, my mother had hired photographers who stalked in the background, shutters clicking in my ears while I tossed a rose on top of his urn. My rage trumped my grief, unable to feel anything in the spotlight of spectators. I tried my best to understand. “Like the Lion King?” I asked.  “When you get old, things just wear out,” he said with a sigh. The cold raked my knuckles, white from carrying the heavy stone. It stole the heat from my fingers until they were completely numb. He was right, I thought. Life isn’t fair. I didn’t need that resentment, guilt, anger, and regret anymore. I didn’t need it leeching my warmth. A gust of wind rustled the branches of the evergreens above like the swish of long, sweeping dress. I closed my eyes and felt tears and sun on my face. They said he collapsed on his way out of the office to battle his way through rush hour. Some bystanders had given him CPR and used the defibrillator twice to get his heart started again. I hated thinking about him like that — surrounded by strangers from the vantage of the floor. Scared, confused. At least he wasn’t alone, I told myself. Cheeks is a woman who has spent her entire life dedicated to helping relieve pain — first as a nurse at the burn center at UVA hospital, as a volunteer for the Sexual Assault Resource Agency (SARA), and later as a psychiatric clinical nurse specialist.  I walked with shoulders back as I left that labyrinth behind, my dad’s voice still in my head. “Life’s not fair,” he’d said. And as I reached the end of the maze, I paused before crossing back over the threshold. The rest of our conversation flooded my mind. One step forward. I didn’t know who I was praying to. Maybe the universe, maybe myself. It didn’t matter. I prayed for the strength to be a better sister, to take their hands the next time they needed me. I prayed for the patience to tackle my life’s problems even when I felt I had no one to call. I prayed for the wisdom to recognize I could be resourceful and perseverant, and that I did, in fact, have people who would pick up the phone when I needed someone. I prayed for forgiveness from myself. The jackhammer stopped, but my heart was racing. I was furious. What did the man think he was doing having kids at that age? Didn’t he realize he wouldn’t be there when I needed him? When my truck was making that clanking noise, when I’d had a bad day at work, when I was proud of myself for life’s small accomplishments. Didn’t he realize I’d have no one to call? She pointed to the pile in the center of the labyrinth. “Once you can leave that stone behind, choose another to represent what you’d like to fill the space you’ve created by letting go of what no longer serves you. Meditate on that as you walk the same path out of the labyrinth.” “We’re going to set an intention now,” Cheeks explained. “As you walk through the labyrinth, focus your mind on what you want to release and visualize pouring it into that rock. When you get to the center of the labyrinth, place it down and give yourself permission to let it go.” Click here to read the whole article At the threshold, my hands now warm again, I felt the smooth stone in my pocket and filled it with the memory. With one last lungful of harsh but life-giving air, I stepped over that pine branch and back into the world. I didn’t know what to say, so I said nothing. Mom was back — when did she get back? — and held his hand and told him that we were here and we loved him. The nurse told me to hold his leg so he wouldn’t rip out his catheter. He looked hazy and sedated but he saw me. We saw each other. And then he closed his eyes for the last time. And without warning, singing a barely recognizable rendition of The Circle of Life, he snatched me up by the armpits like Simba on Pride Rock. I’d laughed until I cried. I nodded. At the entrance of the maze, Cheeks had laid a thin pine branch along the ground. It was the “threshold,” she explained, a physical barrier to represent the beginning and end of this emotional ritual. “Begin when you’re ready,” she said. Immediately, I was drawn to a small pebble of black granite with stripes of white quartz scored along the surface. Holding it between my fingers, I considered it, admiring the contrast of colors, the strangeness of minerals cracked and reformed over millions of years. I placed it back on the ground. “That’s not it,” I said. I liked it too much.last_img read more

Read More »

The market in minutes

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Read More »

Pregnant nurse suspected of having COVID-19 dies in Surabaya hospital

first_imgSeveral hours after the video went viral, East Java Governor Khofifah Indar Parawansa posted a picture of the nurse on her official Instagram account, announcing that she had passed away.“Another medical hero from East Java has passed away. Me, personally, and the East Java administration send our hearts to her and we thank her for her work,” she wrote in the post. (trn) She reportedly passed away at around 10.50 a.m. on Monday, along with her unborn baby. At the time of her death, her swab test result had not been issued, but “RSAL helped with the burial using COVID-19 protocols,” Dewa said as quoted by tribunnews.com. Her death was confirmed by Indonesian Nurses Association (PPNI) chairperson Harif Fadhilla on Monday, who also reported the current number of nurses who have contracted by the disease.Read also: COVID-19: #IndonesiaTerserah trends as frustration mounts over physical distancing violations, govt policies“Twenty nurses nationwide have died of COVID-19,” he said as quoted from kompas.com. A four-month pregnant nurse suspected of having COVID-19 in Surabaya, East Java, died on Monday after receiving treatment at two different hospitals, officials reported. Ari Puspita Sari, 26, had been working at Royal Hospital for a little over a year treating non-COVID-19 patients.According to hospital spokesperson Dewa Nyoman Sutanaya, Ari was admitted and treated there for three days after showing symptoms of COVID-19. As her condition kept deteriorating, she was referred to Dr. Ramelan Navy Hospital (RSAL), also in Surabaya, on Friday. Fifty-nine nurses have been confirmed to have COVID-19, while 48 others are suspected of having the disease.“The data might not be factual as [the patients stepped forward] voluntarily. There might be many nurses who do not report their status,” he said, indicating that the actual number of nurses with COVID-19 might be bigger than the collected data.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo expressed his condolences on Ari’s death through his official Facebook account.“I heard the sad news about Ari Puspita Sari, a nurse at the Royal Hospital Surabaya who passed away with her baby,” he wrote. “My heart goes out to Ari, doctors and other medical workers, as well as those who work on the frontline, battling COVID-19.”A 52-second video showing a patient being taken to a hospital isolation unit by medical staff in hazmat suits previously went viral on social media.The video, posted by a Facebook user named Bayou Prakoso on Facebook on Monday, was captioned: “A nurse of Royal Hospital in Surabaya, positive for COVID-19 and four months pregnant, has little chance to survive as she already depends on a respirator. Please pray for this mother and her baby.”Several other medical workers were seen calling Ari’s name from afar as she was wheeled into an elevator under tight COVID-19 protocols.  Topics :last_img read more

Read More »

Indonesia’s soccer leagues delayed until November amid COVID-19 concerns

first_imgLast week, Iriawan said Liga 1 and Liga 2 had planned to resume on Oct. 1 and 17, respectively. Matches were expected to be held in stadiums in Java to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission from travel.The competitions have been postponed since March due to coronavirus concerns.National Police spokesperson Argo Yuwono previously said any events that could attract large crowds and therefore heighten the risk of coronavirus transmission, such as Liga 1 and Liga 2, were strictly prohibited.“In regards to Liga 1 and 2 that were planned to continue on Oct. 1, the National Police will not issue a crowd permit,” Argo said in a statement as quoted by tempo.co on Tuesday.He said the decision was based on considerations of the current health crisis, particularly the ever-increasing number of confirmed COVID-19 cases.“The National Police has issued a mandate emphasizing that no crowd permits will be issued [for sporting events],” he added.Read also: Indonesian Basketball League gets green light for October restartArgo added that the National Police, alongside the Indonesian Military and other related stakeholders, had been focusing on supporting the government’s COVID-19 protocols, including daily inspections meant to improve compliance among the public.It was previously reported that the government and national sports association had signed an agreement on the implementation of health protocols for sports competitions as the country prepared to resume the postponed soccer and basketball leagues.National COVID-19 task force Doni Monardo signed memorandums of understanding with the Youth and Sports Ministry, the PSSI and the Indonesian Basketball Association (Perbasi) on Sept. 17.He said that all competitions would be held without spectators to prevent COVID-19 transmission. Organizers should also coordinate with the local COVID-19 task force and health agencies prior to the matches.Furthermore, the national COVID-19 task force also forbids athletes, officials and match organizers with a history of chronic illness from taking part in competitions. (rfa) “[…] the PSSI respects and understands the National Police’s decision,” Iriawan said as quoted by kompas.com. “Safety and security considerations remain top priority.”He asked that matches be delayed for only one month and be allowed to resume in November, considering the other pressing events over the course of next year, including the fasting month of Ramadhan – expected to fall next April – and World Cup preparations in May.“We ask for a one-month delay so matches can resume as soon as possible. Otherwise, this year’s generation [of soccer players] will face difficulties,” he said.Read also: Govt readies health protocols as Indonesia looks to resume sports competitions Topics :center_img Indonesia’s top-tier and second-tier soccer leagues, Liga 1 and 2, have been put on hold for an entire month until November as the COVID-19 pandemic continues unabated.Soccer Association of Indonesia (PSSI) chairman Mochamad Iriawan told a press conference on Tuesday that the postponement was in line with the National Police’s staunch position against any activities that could possibly jeopardize public health and safety.On Monday, the police refused to grant the organization permission to hold the major sporting events given the country’s ongoing coronavirus emergency.last_img read more

Read More »

Roman Abramovich has not made contact with Frank Lampard ahead of FA Cup final vs Arsenal

first_imgLampard hopes to win his first piece of silverware as Chelsea manager (Picture: Chelsea FC via Getty)‘I feel the support from the owner. I have felt it from the moment I have taken the job and felt it for many years as a player. I am happy if I can try and make him happy.‘I think last Sunday was a step forward and I want to continue making those steps.‘I have a very close relationship with Marina and with [technical advisor] Petr [Cech]. That relationship has been really good and that feels like a real strength for me, that I can speak to them regularly and we are joined up about how the club is moving forward.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘At the end of the day, all of that will come through the owner. It is his club, his prerogative and we work towards the aims and standards of this club. I am a big boy, I am in this job, I know that there are demands.‘I will always be obviously very welcome to take any call or have any meeting. Because this is my life and I am obsessed by how we can get to where we want to be.‘I do not need those calls, but will be there if they are there to be had.’Who will win the FA Cup final?Arsenal0%Chelsea0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your resultsFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisement Advertisement Roman Abramovich has not made contact with Frank Lampard ahead of FA Cup final vs Arsenal Comment Metro Sport ReporterFriday 31 Jul 2020 11:36 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link917Shares Abramovich has not been in touch with Lampard (Picture: Chelsea FC Via Getty)Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich has not been in touch with Frank Lampard ahead of Saturday’s FA Cup final with Arsenal, the Blues manager has revealed. Lampard delivered Chelsea a top-four finish in his first season in charge after beating Wolves on Sunday but admitted Abramovich had not made contact since. However, the Chelsea legend insists he does not calls from the Russian owner in order to do his job and he maintains a close relationship with director Marina Granovskaia.‘We have not been in touch,’ Lampard said in his pre-match press conference. ‘There is nothing in that. My job is to work as well as I can do.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘After the Wolves result and coming in the top four, which was something we aimed for and achieved, I do not need a phone call or a message or recognition like that.‘My job when we came fourth was to think about how we come higher than fourth next year and close the gap. And it will be similar whatever the result against Arsenal, whether we win or lose.last_img read more

Read More »

Julius C. “Jack” Glaub

first_imgJulius C. “Jack” Glaub, age 66 of Batesville, died Saturday, August 26, 2017 at University Hospital in Cincinnati.  Born December 24, 1950 in Batesville, he is the son of Bertha (Nee: Wilhelm) and John Glaub Sr.  He worked 42 years at the Hill-Rom Company as an electronics assembler before retiring in 2012.Jack liked the outdoors.  He was an avid fisherman and according to his family could out fish everyone.  His other favorite activity was bike riding.  It was common to see him, usually daily, out riding.  Jack was also an accomplished wood worker and enjoyed making clocks and was a long time member of St. Anthony’s Choir.He is survived by his sister Delores Litzinger of Morris; brothers James of Morris, Martin of Morris, Robert of Sunman and John Jr. of Batesville, as well as numerous nieces and nephews.  In addition to his parents, he is also preceded in death by brothers Joseph and Jerome.Visitation is Thursday, August 31st, from 5 – 7 p.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home.  Funeral services are 10 a.m. Friday September 1st, at St. Anthony’s Church with Rev. Shaun Whittington officiating.  Burial will follow in the church cemetery.  The family requests memorials to the St. Anthony People’s Choir or the Monsignor Schmitz Memorial Fund.last_img read more

Read More »