Overtime unpaid – but we’re happy

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Almost a third of staff are never paid overtime, when they work extra hours, a report has found.But even though most UK employees work in excess of their contracted hours each week, 79 per cent of those questioned said they are happy at work.The research found 32 per cent of staff claimed they are never paid for working extra hours while 8 per cent said payment is rare.The Working Family Index, published by Abbey National, also found men are more likely to put in overtime than women.The majority of employees (64 per cent) said they expect to work late every week with 23 per cent saying they do so each day. Just over three-quarters of men (76 per cent) do regular overtime, compared to 52 per cent of women.The research, based on responses from 1,000 people, is commissioned by the bank annually to help it shape policies for both staff and customers. Retail marketing director Gary Hockey-Morley said the bank is committed to helping staff balance work and home life.He said, “We were amazed to find so many people putting in so many unpaid hours.“It should not be a rarity for staff to leave at their contracted hour. If anything, modern management should be encouraging employees to undertake their work within contracted hours and leave on time.” Overtime unpaid – but we’re happyOn 25 Jul 2000 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Germany retires last fast attack craft

first_img Two Gepard-class boats sail in formation. Photo: German NavyThe German Navy decommissioned the last of its fast attack craft during a ceremony on Wednesday at the Warnemünde Navy Base in Rostock.With the decommissioning of the last four Gepard-class fast attack craft and therefore the last fast attack squadron, the navy is closing a chapter of its history that started in 1956 with the delivery of first boats from the Royal Navy.The ceremony was attended by both military and public officials as well as the current Inspector of the Navy, Vice-Admiral Andreas Krause. The boats were formally removed from the service by Rear Admiral Jan C. Kaack, 1st Flotilla commander.Built during and for the Cold War era, the boats were predominantly used in the littoral regions of the Baltic Sea in the beginning. The changing operational demands and deployments of the German Navy eventually saw the fast attack craft switch from cold Baltic to warmer waters of Africa.In the past eleven years, Gepards showed their prowess with deployments to UNIFIL and operation Enduring Freedom. According to the German Navy, the boats spent 2,300 days deployed to the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL).The German Navy received the first fast attack craft from the Royal Navy on May 29, 1956. The delivered boats were the previously seized S1 and S3 that were to be known as Silbermöwe (Seagull) class in the newly formed German Navy. After the Silbermöwe, Germany commissioned 30 Jaguar-class and 10 Zobel (Sable) class boats which were replaced by 20 Tiger-class vessels. Tiger-class in turn were replaced the Albatros and later Gepard-class fast attack craft.Germany had a total of eight Gepard-class attack craft in service. Four vessels were decommissioned between 2012 and 2015 with Hermelin, Zobel, Frettchen and Hyäne following suit this year. Back to overview,Home naval-today Germany retires last fast attack craft View post tag: German Navy Authorities November 16, 2016 View post tag: Fast Attack Craft View post tag: Gepard-Class Germany retires last fast attack craft Share this articlelast_img read more

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Turnbull denies Hell claims

first_imgPrincipal of Wycliffe Hall, Dr Richard Turnbull, has reacted against recent accusations of reactionary evangelicalism at his College in an article published in the Guardian. “I know of no homophobia or misogyny at Wycliffe,” he wrote. Turnbull also argued that his assertion that 95 per cent of Britons are going to Hell had been taken out of context. “This is a misrepresentation when the rest of my sentence, ‘unless the message of the gospel is brought to them’, is excluded,” he said.last_img

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Rewarding staff for great service

first_imgA common question when I visit bakeries is how to keep staff motivated and providing good service. The answer? Reward them. If you’re going to empower your team to be successful, you need to reward them if they do something well.Spotting good service is easy for both customer and manager. It’s about staff following the ABC principle going Above and Beyond the Call of duty.There are three main ways to measure great service: get feedback from customers, get feedback from a mystery shopping or a market research company or, most usefully, see it for yourself. Witnessing good customer service in action is the best way, as it forces managers to get out into their stores and see what’s actually going on.Giving people instant recognition is incredibly powerful. For example, in one coffee chain that we mystery shop, if a staff member up-sells to a large coffee, they get on-the-spot recognition, as the mystery shopper says ’Thank you’ and gives them a £20 note with a certificate. Needless to say, all the staff now up-sell more often, with a resultant boost to the bottom line.One chain of bakers I’ve worked with holds internal competitions, so whoever sells the most of a certain key line in a day gets rewarded. Every time they sell today’s nominated product such as a doughnut a sticker is put on a chart by the till and the person with the most stickers at the end of the day wins £5.The reward itself isn’t always important it’s the recognition that counts. We once worked with a supermarket group in Australia where the Manager of the Year won a holiday for themselves and their family. In the UK, we work with a group who give staff a mug. Both loved their reward equally. However, if you’re unsure what to give, gift vouchers are always a winner, as it allows the staff member to choose what he or she wants, so it’s personal.Any reward programme needs to be based on something measured consistently be it mystery shopping scores, turnover, profit, wastage etc. As long as the measurement is consistent over the period, this can work well, but you cannot change the goal posts half way through; don’t suddenly raise the bar, as it will be seen as unfair to the staff.At the end of the day, one of the most powerful ways to show appreciation is to verbalise it “well done”, or “good job”. People really appreciate it and we often hear from staff that it’s the first time in 10 years that anyone has said it to them. Try it and see what happens.www.shopperanonymous.co.uk.last_img read more

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LFLs and underlying profits up at Sainsbury’s

first_imgUnderlying profits have increased by 6.2% at supermarket chain Sainsbury’s to £756m.Unveiling its full year results to 16 March the company said however that its pre-tax figure fell 1.4% to £788m when property disposals were included.Total sales rose by 4.6% to £25.6bn, driven by 33 consecutive quarters of like-for-like sales growth.It came as the retailer also announced it was taking full control of Sainsbury’s Bank in a £248 million deal to buy the 50% stake held by taxpayer-backed Lloyds Banking Group.Chief executive Justin King was bullish and said: “Whilst we see no near-term change in the current economic situation, we remain confident that by continuing to invest in our long-standing strategy and by understanding and helping our customers, we are well positioned for future growth.”Sainsbury’s said it had outperformed competitors, citing figures from earlier this year which showed it had achieved 16.8% market share.Online grocery sales were nearing the £1bn mark, while Sainsbury’s convenience stores took £1.5bn, the company announced. During the year, it opened 14 new supermarkets, eight extensions and 87 convenience stores.last_img read more

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John Mayer Surprise Guests Jerry Garcia 75th Birthday Concert With Bob Weir, Oteil Burbridge, And More

first_imgThe Grateful Dead community celebrated what would have been Jerry Garcia‘s birthday earlier this week. On Friday night at Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison, CO, the celebration peaked with a Bob Weir-led special tribute to Garcia. The evening, simply dubbed “Jerry Garcia 75th Birthday Concert,” featured performances by both Weir’s Campfire Band and The Jerry Garcia 75th Birthday Band, a special collaboration featuring Melvin Seals, Jackie LaBranch, and Gloria Jones of Jerry Garcia Band as well as Oteil Burbridge (Dead & Company), Kamasi Washington, Tom Hamilton (Joe Russo’s Almost Dead; American Babies), Duane Trucks (Widespread Panic), and a surprise appearance from John Mayer. The evening begun with the Jerry Garcia 75th Birthday Acoustic Band, which featured Kenny Kosek, Sandy Rothman,  Anders Osborne, Travis Book and Chris Pandolfi from The Infamous Stringdusters. With all that talent on the stage, perhaps the biggest stars were the collection of Jerry Garcia’s guitars, including his Wolf, Tiger, Rosebud, and two Travis Bean axes that were present. The evening was a strict dedication to Jerry Garcia, with Grateful Dead and JGB tunes galore, along with some favorited covers. Each set featured a varying array of classics, showed off by an eclectic mix of musicians with either a deep connection to Garcia, or a close association to his music.Check out these video highlights below, courtesy of YouTube user Kyle Isaac:Bob Weir & The Campfire Band, “Friend of the Devil” into “Brokedown Palace” with John Mayer and Steve KimockBob Weir & The Campfire Band “Althea” with John Mayer and Steve KimockJerry Garcia Band “Deal” featuring Melvin Seals, Jackie LaBranch, Gloria Jones, Oteil Burbridge, Kamasi Washington, Tom Hamilton and Duane Trucks with special guest John MayerJerry Garcia Band “Tangled Up In Blue” featuring Melvin Seals, Jackie LaBranch, Gloria Jones, Oteil Burbridge, Kamasi Washington, Tom Hamilton and Duane TrucksJerry Garcia Band “Senor” featuring Melvin Seals, Jackie LaBranch, Gloria Jones, Oteil Burbridge, Kamasi Washington, Tom Hamilton and Duane Trucks with special guest Bob WeirSee the setlist recap below, courtesy of Ratdog.org.Jerry Garcia 75th Birthday Acoustic BandSet: Deep Elem Blues, ??, I’ve Been All Around This World, Friend of the Devil, Two Soldiers, If I Lose, Trouble In Mind, Black Muddy River, Short Life of TroubleJerry Garcia 75th Birthday BandSet: How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You) > The Harder They Come, Senor (w/Bob Weir guitar/vocals), Waiting For A Miracle, Cats Down Under the Stars, Tangled Up In Blue, Reuben and Cerise, Sisters and Brothers, Gomorrah, Dear Prudence, Deal*Bob Weir & the Campfire BandSet: Loose Lucy (Solo), Peggy-O (Solo), Only A River (Solo), Althea*, Brown-Eyed Women*, Tennessee Jed*, Bird Song*> Dark Star*> Bird Song*, Eyes of the World**, Morning Dew*, I Know You Rider*Encore: Friend of the Devil*, Brokedown Palace**With John Mayer / ** With John Mayer and Oteil Burbridgelast_img read more

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Samuel Hutchison Beer

first_imgSamuel Hutchison Beer, the distinguished Harvard political scientist, died in his sleep at the age of 97 in Washington, D.C., on April 7, 2009.His special field was British politics, in which he was for years the world’s leading expert.  But he also studied the American political system, and, for contrast to academic life, made himself active in American politics as a life-long Democrat and Chairman of Americans for Democratic Action (1959-1962).  He was a man brave beyond the calling of a professor: in June 1944 he fought in the U.S. Army in Normandy, earning a Bronze Star; and his peacetime hobbies included rock climbing and skydiving.Sam Beer was born on July 28, 1911, in Bucyrus, Ohio, and graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in 1932.  He was a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford, from 1932 to 1935, and married Roberta Frances Reed on June 22, 1935.  He worked on the staff of the Democratic National Committee and as occasional speechwriter for President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935-1936; as a reporter for the New York Post in 1936-1937; and as writer at Fortune magazine in 1937-1938.  He then went to Harvard University for graduate study and received his Ph.D. in political science in 1943.After his wartime duty as Captain in artillery, Beer spent a year in the U.S. Military Government in Germany (1945).  While at Oxford he had traveled to Germany and taken note of the rising threat of Nazism; after the war he was able to pursue his interest in the question of how so civilized a country, governed as a democracy, could lose so much and come so low.  When he returned to Harvard to teach in 1946, he gave a course on that topic and became the leader of an approach to comparative government that made sense of facts through the ideas of political, social, and economic theory.  He began teaching in Harvard’s new General Education program “Social Sciences 2,” a course on Western thought and institutions that was as much history as political science, and as much political theory as comparative government. He continued this famous course for over 30 years to the benefit and admiration of thousands of Harvard undergraduates. And for all those years he met regularly with the graduate student teaching fellows in the course, who discovered that they were arguing with a professor who had formed his opinions but also, unconcerned with display or triumph, helped them to form theirs.Sam Beer’s first book was titled The City of Reason (1949), a study in the tradition of Oxford idealism that sees the reason inherent in human things rather than hovering above them and criticizing irrationalities.  Avoiding the vague complacency of such a view, he turned to facts and entered the domain of social science, where he took care to consider the fact of human intent and to maintain the role of ideas.  He launched the thorough study of British politics that made him celebrated in Britain as the man who knew their politics better than they did.  In 1965 he published the book that secured his reputation, British Politics in the Collectivist Age, combining an analysis of postwar British socialism with the hard facts of political parties and pressure groups.  Beer was for years the foremost scholar of British politics, the master of its very British intricacies and a detective who found their apparently accidental coherence.  Though an admirer of Britain, he never believed that British politics could be a model for American politics, in which he had an absorbing interest that was not merely academic.  In 1982 he published Britain Against Itself: The Political Contradictions of Collectivism, a sequel analyzing the stagnation of collectivism in the interplay of interests it had created.Always a partisan outside but never inside the classroom, Beer took a leading role in opposing the student rebellion of the late Sixties at Harvard, criticizing the politicization of universities.  In 1998 he also criticized the politicization of impeachment, testifying to the House of Representatives in the case of President Clinton.  His study of American politics was crowned by the publication of his major work To Make a Nation: The Rediscovery of American Federalism in 1993, when he was 82.  In it he stressed the original national purpose behind the idea of states’ rights, often abused to diminish the American nation.At Harvard Beer served as the Eaton Professor of the Science of Government from 1971 and was chair of the Department of Government from 1954 to 1958.  He received an honorary doctorate from Harvard in 1997.  Retiring at Harvard in 1982, and with vitality intact, he moved to Boston College to become the first Thomas P. O’Neill, Jr., Professor of American Politics, in part to honor his friend, the former Speaker of the House of Representatives.  He was also elected President of the American Political Science Association in 1977, and was made a Fellow of the British Academy in 2000.The honors Beer received and even the books he wrote were emblems of the life he led, which was the life of a teacher.  His teaching was memorable above all for the warmth of the virtue he conveyed in it.  Neither cynic nor idealist, the everyday world’s recalcitrance to our most compelling ideals never dampened his good cheer.His hearty affections were in plain sight: for his wife, Jane, his true companion; for his beloved late wife, Roberta (who died in 1987); for his children, Kitty, Frances, and Billy (who died in 1991), his step-children, Alison and Camilla, and his grandchildren, step-grandchildren, and great-grandchild; for his hometown Bucyrus; for Harvard, his intellectual home for over 70 years, and his many students there; for Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Democratic Party; and for his country, which he served wisely in peace and bravely in war.Respectfully submitted,Peter HallJ. Russell MuirheadMelvin RichterMichael WalzerHarvey C. Mansfield, Chairlast_img read more

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The Scottsboro Boys Will Transfer to the West End!

first_imgKander and Ebb’s The Scottsboro Boys will transfer to the West End’s Garrick Theatre, following its highly acclaimed run at the Young Vic. Directed and choreographed by Susan Stroman, the award-winning production will begin performances on October 4 prior to an October 20 opening night. Casting will be announced at a later date. The Scottsboro Boys first played off-Broadway at the Vineyard Theatre and the Guthrie Theatre prior to opening on Broadway in 2010, earning 12 Tony nominations, including Best Musical and Best Direction of a Musical. The tuner received its London premiere in 2013 and went on to receive the Critics’ Circle Award for Best Musical. The Scottsboro Boys is based on the notorious “Scottsboro” case of the 1930s, in which nine African-American men were unjustly accused of attacking two white women on a train in Alabama. The young men were convicted by an all-white jury and spent years in jail while the case was tried and retried. The musical uses the bygone minstrel show performance style to tell the boys’ story and recently came under attack from protestors who did not approve of the minstrel format.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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New program to help start, expand businesses

first_imgToday, Secretary of State Deb Markowitz, along with the Darcy Carter, director of the Vermont office of the Small Business Administration (SBA), and Linda Rossi, Assistant Director of the Vermont Small Business Development Center (VtSBDC) unveiled Community Business Connections, an important project designed to create new jobs by helping Vermonters start and expand businesses. These are difficult times for Vermont families and we believe that each one of us must do everything we can to jump-start our economy. Markowitz said. Whether we are government officials, individual entrepreneurs, local chambers of commerce, or members of civic and service organizations we could be doing more to help Vermonters start and expand businesses. Carter said, There are a wealth of resources available to help new and existing businesses and Community Business Connections was developed to get this information to the people who need it most.Community Business Connections includes three componentsOne-Stop-Shop for Starting a New Business. www.startabusinessinvermont.net(link is external) is the Community Business Connections website. It is a new resource designed to provide everything a person needs to know to start or expand a business in Vermont. This one-stop-shop for starting or expanding a business provides step-by-step information in checklist form and important links to help entrepreneurs develop a business plan, obtain financing, navigate tax requirements and regulations, find customers and expand sales.Community Outreach. Community Business Connections is reaching into every community to get the word out about the free resources available to help Vermonters start or expand businesses. With stickers for public access computers in libraries and public buildings directing Vermonters to the new website and posters advertising the free resources available through the Small Business Administration and the Vermont Small Business Development Centers the program is expected to reach Vermonters in every part of the state.Training for Local Economic Development Ambassadors. Community Business Connections also provides training to local officials, librarians, individual entrepreneurs and citizens to help them become local economic development ambassadors. Through trainings given around the state and webinars the Secretary of States office, the SBA and the SBDC are educating people across Vermont about what they can do to help jump start their own local economies.Rossi said, Our goal is to reach people at the most local level . . . people who may not be accustomed to thinking about business, either for themselves or on behalf of others in their community. In each of our communities there are people who are losing their jobs and need to figure out what they re going to do next, said Markowitz. Starting a business may not be right for everyone, but if we all took a moment to reach out, I bet we would be surprised by the number of people in our communities who are ready to take the plunge.For more information about this program, please contact the SBA at 802-828-4422, the VtSBDC at 800-464-7232, or the Vermont Secretary of State’s Office at 800-439-8683.Business Fact SheetAccording to a survey by FindLaw.com reported in March 2009, 61 percent of Americans have either started or thought about starting a small business. Thirty percent of Americans say they have started at least one small business. An additional 31 percent have thought about starting their own business at some point in their lives.The Vermont Small Business Development Center (VtSBDC) has a long history of providing advice and training to Vermonters. To date, they have trained over 20,000 Vermonters in 1,700 separate events, and provided individual, in-person, confidential counseling to over 8,000 business people representing all stages of business. In 2007, 1,868 new jobs were created by client businesses of the VtSBDC, and these businesses contributed over $4.4 million in new tax revenues.The Vermont office of the U.S. Small Business Administration reports:Vermont had 18,937 small employers (fewer than 500 employees) in 2006, representing 96.8 percent of the state s employers and 63.5 percent of its private-sector employment.The retail trade industry was the state s largest small business and overall employer in 2006.Small businesses created 51.7 percent of the state’s net new jobs from 2004 to 2005Vermont’s real gross state product increased by 1.5 percent in 2007. By comparison, growth in the New England region was 2.1 percent and the United States, 2.0 percent. (Source: U.S. Dept. of Commerce: Bureau of Economic Analysis).The Vermont Secretary of State s Office reports that in 2008 over 8,631 new business entities registered in Vermont.last_img read more

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Jogger Struck and Killed in Garden City

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 64-year-old woman was accidentally struck and killed by a vehicle in Garden City while she was jogging just before noon on Friday, Nassau County police said.Detectives said  Irene Puswald from Garden City South woman was jogging on Kensington Road near the intersection of Salisbury Avenue when she was struck by a 2003 Honda CRV. The 43-year-old West Hempstead woman behind the wheel was driving northbound on Kensington Road, police said.The accident caused the victim to suffer multiple trauma injuries, police said. She was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital at 4:30 p.m., police said.The accident, which police said involves no criminality, is still under investigation.last_img

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