Watch As Ween Jams With The Great Bernie Worrell In 2003

first_imgIt’s well known that the guys from Ween are huge fans of the great Bernie Worrell. The band’s lovable guitarist Dean Ween recently had the opportunity to play with Parliament Funkadelic guitarist Michael Hampton, and had scheduled a Dean Ween Group show that was supposed to feature Worrell as a special guest star. Though Worrell had to unfortunately cancel due to his ailing health, the group still played the set, however, dedicating the music as a tribute to Worrell and his legacy.The Ween-Worrell connection has a much deeper history, as the funk wizard once joined Ween at their performance on September 26th, 2003 in Berkeley, CA. The band hit the Greek Theatre, welcoming out Worrell for an extra funky take on the Ween original tune, “Pandy Fackler.”Watch some footage of that jam session below, as well as a full-length audio stream of the collaboration. For the Ween faithful, here’s a playlist of every song from that fateful performance in 2003. Enjoy!last_img read more

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Mountain Mama: Resolve

first_imgI rode my bike for the first time this year today, barely managing to get my seat in the saddle before January ends. When I cut images of women on bikes from magazines and pasted them onto my vision board, I vowed to make a few solid changes to my daily routines. Riding bikes feels like play and I get that giddy high that comes from endorphins and spending time in the woods. Plus I’d get fit, I figured.How had almost a month passed and I hadn’t gotten on my bike? Maybe the snow, ice, and freezing temperatures were to blame, or the muddy conditions left in their wake. Probably, though, my general tendency to hibernate until spring unfolds was the culprit.I’m not alone. One third of resolutions don’t make it past the end of January and over half of resolutions fail over the course of a year. Even as I doubted that resolutions really work, I felt a pang of guilt every time I walked past my mountain bike propped up on the screened porch as I rushed out the door to meet a work deadline or pick up my son on time. I missed riding bikes with my friends, reminding me of something important – riding bikes wasn’t a chore, I actually wanted to get out there.Looking to make a long-lasting change was going to require more than pasting a photo of someone else riding her bike. It was going to require me to make room in my already busy schedule. I wasn’t going to go far or ride anything tough, I just had to get started again, reminding myself that any ride would be better than sitting in front of my computer.I pulled out my calendar and added group rides, making them sacred, uninterruptable time the way work and time with my son are. If a ride was on my calendar, I wouldn’t bail if I didn’t feel in the mood or wasn’t particularly motivated. I’d put on my biking clothes, pump up my tires and meet the group at the trailhead.Getting to the trailhead was the most difficult part of riding.  Once on my bike, the miles rolled by as I caught up with friends and met new ones, sharing rides we’d love and ones we wanted to tackle this year. The searing burn in my hamstrings subsided as I found a groove, one pedal stroke at a time.Big smiles and high-fives were shared, and I remembered the power of making a plan and sticking to it.last_img read more

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Lawsuit Claims Suffolk Taxpayers Are Owed $250M

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Calling it “the biggest ripoff” in Suffolk County history, a pair of veteran Long Island attorneys claim that the Southwest Sewer District has illegally overcharged local taxpayers by more than a quarter of a billion dollars since 2009.If their recently amended lawsuit is successful, then some 340,000 residents in Babylon, Islip and part of Huntington stand to get refunds of $3,361.10 each.The original lawsuit, filed in February in State Supreme Court in Riverhead by the law firms of Paul Sabatino II, a former Suffolk chief deputy county executive, and Reilly, Like, and Tenety asserted that the 57-square-mile sewer district had accumulated an illegal balance of $116.9 million. But the lawyers say they subsequently discovered that the county had added another $138 million to the cumulative surplus. So, they returned to court in October to amend their class action lawsuit to recover $254.9 million in over-taxation.“The magnitude of Suffolk County’s deception in trying to hide these huge surpluses from its own citizens is shocking and the contempt that it shows by county officials for the will of the people is reprehensible,” said Sabatino, who was County Executive Steve Levy’s chief deputy from 2004 to 2007 and former counsel to the Suffolk County Legislature for almost 20 years before that. “This deception has evolved into the biggest rip-off of taxpayers in the history of Suffolk County.”The lawsuit specifically cites four public referenda approved by Suffolk County voters in 1983, 1989, 1995 and 2006, which directed county officials “to return the surpluses, known as Fund Balances, to the taxpayers.” Instead, the attorneys claim, the county violated section 4-10 (F) of the Suffolk County Charter by placing the surplus in Fund 405, which they say “is an illegal fund used by the County as a subterfuge…” Irving Like, founding partner of his firm, was a member of the Suffolk County Charter Review Commission. Sabatino, as legislative counsel, helped draft the charter.As Suffolk County Comptroller, John M. Kennedy Jr. called the lawsuit “troubling” but he declined to discuss its merits, which he might have done had he still been in the legislature, where the Republican represented the 12th District for a decade until being elected to his current office in 2014 as the county’s chief fiscal officer and auditing authority.“There’s two parts here: there’s the calculus as to whether in fact an improper collection occurred and then there’s the remedy,” Kennedy told the Press. “Were we compelled to have to pay back the full amount being sought in one fell swoop, would that have dire consequences for the county? Yes, it would, in my opinion.”The court is not expected to hold hearings on the lawsuit until next year.In early October, James O’Connor, the Republican then running for Suffolk County executive, tried to make the Southwest Sewer District surplus a campaign issue. O’Connor held a press conference at the Bergen Point Sewage Treatment Plant in West Babylon and reportedly accused the Bellone administration of keeping the sewer taxes high to pay down the costs of capital construction projects.In response, Suffolk Deputy County Executive Jon Schneider told Newsday that replacing the outflow pipe from Bergen Point might cost $207 million, and the county secured about $40 million in low or no-interest loans from the state. Bellone’s deputy added that O’Connor’s accusation was the action of a “desperate politician.”A month later Bellone easily won re-election with 57 percent of the vote, while O’Connor polled 43 percent. The incumbent also substantially outraised the challenger; Bellone had $1.8 million in his campaign war chest, while O’Connor had raised about $172,000.In the meantime, Sabatino and Like redid their math and raised the amount of the surplus they were targeting for refunds.Asked to comment about the now $254.9 million lawsuit, a spokesperson for Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone summarily dismissed it.“The County has about $70-plus million in ‘pay go’ projects for [the] Southwest Sewer District and has a potential draw-down for the outfall pipe of about $200 million, so budgeting has been reasonable,” said Vanessa B. Streeter, Bellone’s communications director, in an emailed statement to the Press. “The later proposed amendments to the complaint have no merit.”In the amended lawsuit the attorneys allege that the 2016 county budget “added $33.295 million to the illegal surplus in defiance of the [February] lawsuit seeking the return of illegal fund balances.” They also claim that the sewer district’s taxpayers were “illegally charged” to repay a pure subsidy from the ¼ percent sales tax that supports the drinking water protection program through the Environmental Trust Fund (known as Fund 404), “even though the public voted via public referenda…to give those sales tax proceeds to county sewer districts for the purpose of preventing double digit and triple digit sewer tax hikes.”According to the attorneys’ recalculation, the average taxpayer in the sewer district is entitled to a refund of $3,361.10—originally it called for $1,542. The attorneys say the over-taxation stems from the repeated failure of county officials to pass on “the substantial savings” that arose from the amortization of Southwest Sewer District’s debt that had been issued in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. As the debt was paid off “in increasingly large amounts,” the lawsuit says, the county held on to the savings instead of returning it to the taxpayers as the county statute and state law required.“As I warned at the beginning of this lawsuit, failure to stop this violation of the constitutional rights of the taxpayers would only encourage the county to continue its unlawful behavior in the future,” said Like in a statement. “Unfortunately, the responsible county officials have not heeded this warning. We are filing this Amended Lawsuit to protect the public interest against the county’s disregard of the laws its own voters have adopted. The strong policy of the law requires a full accounting of all public funds to prevent local governments from acquiring tax proceeds faster than they are needed and for costs and expenses not incurred.”The lawsuit’s attorneys retained former Suffolk County Budget Director, Robert Bortzfield, CPA, a career civil servant who worked in county government from 1972 to 2007, to verify the validity of the claims being made in this lawsuit.“A careful review of the finances and budgets of the SWSD confirms that the taxpayers and ratepayers in the SWSD have been overtaxed by at least $ 254.9 million,” Bortzfield said in a statement, “and the amount will continue to grow if this lawsuit is not successful.”“This is going to drag on,” Sabatino tells the Press. “The county basically stonewalled for 10 months. We tried to work with them. They’re not acting in good faith. When they came out with a new budget [for 2016] that made things worse, not better, we knew that they weren’t for real.”last_img read more

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Taking tokenization beyond the transaction

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Apple Pay has elevated mobile payments to a topic of conversation across financial institutions and credit unions, large and small. And many of those conversations relate to how these more “traditional” players get their foot in the mobile payments door. PYMNTS caught up with Melissa Santora, Fiserv Product Strategist to gain her perspective on the current and future state of mobile payments’ adoption and how FIs can actually “dust off” old mobile payments strategies to get to the top of any wallet – digital or physical.Tokenization has become a very popular concept in payments. What impact does tokenization have on financial institutions and the payments industry? MS: The impact we’re seeing on financial institutions and the payments industry relative to tokenization has been one of tremendous interest, especially since the launch of Apple Pay late last year. Apple Pay is the first use case for tokenization specifically through the EMVCo specifications, which utilize tokenization for static tokens. Therefore, the token resides on a user’s phone instead of their card number.One of the main concerns with mobile payments for our clients and their cardholders has been security. So now with tokenization, the token replaces the card number, which isn’t exposed on the phone to the merchant or through the transaction message. That’s a very powerful message for the cardholder. continue reading »last_img read more

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WS Atkins feels the squeeze and considers LSH buyout

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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$10 could land you a dream home in a town that’s a hipster magnet

first_imgEndeavour Foundation’s latest lottery prize home. Picture: SuppliedThe four bedroom home at 5 Brookhaven Court, Maleny, was a short drive from the Sunshine Coast CBD, and set in “lush, rolling hills and with views to inspire”.The home also has a study and three full bathrooms with a major nod towards outdoor living and entertaining given a very generous veranda and fully furnished gazebo that also has its own outdoor fireplace.Endeavour Foundation’s latest lottery prize home is a stunning $1.1m Queenslander in the heart of the Sunshine Coast Hinterland. Picture: Supplied Funds raised go towards helping create opportunities for people with disabilities. Picture: SuppliedMr Thomas said the beauty of the prize homes were that they changed multiple lives not just that of the new owners.“They’re a vital piece of the puzzle when it comes to partnering with people with a disability to explore their potential. The funds we raise help provide employment opportunities, life skill development, and enhance access to and connection with the wider community.“As we create these beautiful homes our teams are, in parallel, partnering with people with a disability to build independence, confidence and self-esteem. It’s a winning formula.” Endeavour Foundation’s latest lottery prize home is a stunning $1.1m Queenslander in the heart of the Sunshine Coast Hinterland. Picture: SuppliedA LUXURIOUS Queensland hinterland property up for grabs for as little as $10 is the latest in a long line of Endeavour Foundation prize homes.The foundation, which uses its lotteries as a way to raise funds to help create opportunities for people with disabilities, has chosen Maleny for its latest dream home.The $1.1m Queenslander has a gazebo that comes with an outdoor fireplace. Picture: Supplied“In a nod to the charity’s historic roots, it is a stunning $1.1m Queenslander in the heart of the Sunshine Coast Hinterland,” a spokesperson said.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:34Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAussie Homesteads00:34Andrew Thomas, Endeavour Foundation’s executive general manager of supporter enterprises, said the area was a haven for those who loved creative pursuits.“This property will not disappoint,” he said. “Located 450 metres above sea level on the Blackall Range, Maleny is a haven for artists, musicians and craftspeople. This is more than a home – it’s a lifestyle.”More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home6 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor6 hours agoMaleny in the Sunshine Coast Hinterland is a haven for creative pursuits. Picture: Suppliedlast_img read more

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Pro-choice people who have become pro-life

first_imgLifeSiteNews 12 August 2013Let’s be honest. To truly be successful advocates for life, we can’t just spend our time “preaching to the choir.” We must step outside our comfort zone to reach those who are on the other side. This is no easy task when you’re faced with individuals who hurl obscenities, act combative or are willfully defiant. But if we’re to change hearts and minds, we must first try to understand the motives of those who are for abortion.Not all pro-abortion advocates are the same, but I believe there are five general traits that exist among this group. They are:Disconnected: They resort to a narrow viewpoint that this is only an issue of women’s rights, rather than facing the reality that there is another life at hand.Deceived: Through misguided intentions, they believe that they’re truly helping women.Disassociated: This represents those who say, “I wouldn’t do it, but it’s not my place to make the decision for someone else.”Denial: Out of selfishness, some deny responsibility and believe in sex without consequences, including pregnancy.Dehumanizing: This is an attempt to reject the humanity of the unborn child by not considering him or her to be a person.What’s common throughout these characteristics is that the perspective is narrow—they lack the vision to see the entire picture. And that’s the key. Advocates of abortion want to stay focused only on their limited talking points. When a person’s eyes are opened to the full reality of what abortion means, viewpoints can and will change. To learn how this transition succeeds, let’s take a look at some true stories of individuals who were once in favor of abortion.http://www.lifesitenews.com/news/pro-choice-people-who-have-become-pro-life-three-storieslast_img read more

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UCL: Klopp develops selection headache ahead of Atletico Madrid duel

first_img The Reds head to the Wanda Metroplitano, the scene of their Champions League triumph, for the first leg of their last-16 tie. They have been boosted by the return of midfielder Naby Keita, who made his first start since Boxing Day in Saturday’s 1-0 win over Norwich City. The 25-year-old, who missed four games with a groin strain, is part of their travelling 21-man squad in the Spanish capital and Klopp admits his weekend display has given him plenty to think about. “Thank God, we have a squad that offers us different solutions. We had injuries but nobody speaks about it because we never suffered from it. That is good. “For the players when they come back, rhythm-wise, look at Joel [Matip] and Dejan [Lovren]. They both played sensationally for us and now Joel was not in the squad [at Norwich]. That’s really, really hard.Advertisement Liverpool manager, Jurgen Klopp, has developed selection headache ahead of their UEFA Champions League duel against Atletico Madrid today. “When they are all fit, this is the situation – that’s for Naby the same and for others.” Klopp will face off against Diego Simeone on the touchline in a competitive game for the first time – a clash he believes will be an intriguing prospect. He added: “His teams are always world-class organised. That makes him one of the best. Read Also:Anderlecht starlet lined up to succeed Mane turned down Liverpool boss “We have exchanged messages after big games. “We meet in a competitive game for the first time. It will be interesting, really interesting.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Promoted Content10 Irresistibly Gorgeous Asian Actresses7 Facts About Black Holes That Will Blow Your MindWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?8 Addictive And Fun Coffee FactsBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeThe Top 9 Oddest Underwater Discoveries No One Can Explain11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do12 Actors Who Always Play Bad CharactersThe Most Beautiful Middle Eastern ActressesCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?last_img read more

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Trevor Bauer

first_imgTrevor Bauer is a pitcher for the Cleveland Indians.  In a recent article I read in Sports Illustrated, Bauer explained his long toss theory for keeping his arm strong and preventing the injuries that so many pitchers today face.  Three to five times a week, instead of throwing on the sidelines which so many pitchers do, he goes to the outfield and uses a 30-35 degree arc on his throws.  This is what is known as the long toss.  He says it improves his strength and does not put stress on his arm.This technique was introduced by Alan Jaeger.  Jaeger teaches this technique to young arms as well as veteran pitchers.  If you are interested in this technique for your young son or daughter, simply put Jaeger’s name in your search engine and you will find all kinds of information on it.  It certainly makes sense to me since so many pitchers seem to be subject to surgery at a young age.  Jaeger will even suggest you try this technique from a distance of only 10 feet at the beginning.  As you age, you increase the distance.last_img read more

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BCEF 2018 Engraved Paver program dedicated to flexible learning spaces

first_imgBatesville, In. — Engraved pavers are back as the Batesville Community Education Foundation (BCEF) kicks off its second annual campaign, according to BCEF executive director Anne Wilson.  The education foundation has set a goal of raising $50,000 by June 30 to fund two additional flexible learning spaces and other vital foundation initiatives.“Our engraved paver sale last year was very popular,” Wilson said, “and we’ve had a waiting list since then. We’ll be offering the pavers again and will have them engraved on-site within the patio already installed outside the new BHS arts and athletics entrance. As we did last year, we’re also requesting donations from community members to help us meet our goal.“Thanks to widespread community support in 2017, we were able to donate $20,000 to the Batesville Community School Corporation (BCSC), which funded a flexible learning space at Batesville High School (BHS), Wilson explained. “Along with spaces at the other three school buildings — funded through a digital learning grant from the State of Indiana — the pieces we funded for English teacher’s Paul Satchwill’s room were well-received. BCSC conducted surveys of the students and teachers before and after the spaces were installed, and results showed student improvement in the areas of communication, creativity, and critical thinking.”Flexible learning spaces are innovative classroom pieces that can be easily moved to facilitate independent study, small group collaboration, or total class interaction. Adaptability promotes student engagement and aids teachers in integrating technology.“The program is so innovative, Batesville’s flexible learning spaces were featured recently on WKRC-TV in Cincinnati during its ‘News Where You Live’ segment,” Wilson explained. “That was exciting — to see something we supported being showcased for its ingenuity.“The survey results and comments from the students and teachers confirmed BCEF’s commitment to expanding this initiative to additional classrooms,” Wilson said. “However, it is an expensive project, with the average cost to outfit one classroom (including multiple media screens) at approximately $20,000. Our goal of $50,000 will enable us to donate enough to BCSC so the administration can target two additional spaces in areas of most impact and leave us with enough to help fund some of our other programs.”Pavers are available in the following three sizes:  4 inches by 8 inches with three lines of text — $75; 8 inches by 8 inches with six lines of text — $150; and 8 inches by 8 inches with a special blue Batesville B and four lines of text — $500.“The paver patio turned out wonderfully,” Wilson said. “We encourage everyone to check it out if you haven’t seen it yet. From pavers for graduates to ones for families, alumni, or loved ones, it was interesting to see everyone’s creativity. This year, we’ll be doing the engraving on-site on the blank pavers already installed. Once those are full, we’ll consider opening up a new section if interest warrants.“Everything needed to order a paver or donate is online at our website, BatesvilleEducationFoundation.org,” Wilson noted. “Paver orders and donations can be processed there with a credit card. Paper forms are available for download if someone wants to mail it in with a check.  Forms are also available at the BCSC administration building.”Besides the pavers, Wilson notes the critical need for general donations from community members in order to meet BCEF’s goal.“Last year, nearly 60% of our funds came not from the paver sales but from donors who believed in our mission and contributed,” Wilson added.  “We encourage everyone to consider if they can help us move this project forward with a donation and/or purchase of a paver. We think this flexible learning spaces initiative is a difference maker — and that’s what BCEF is all about.”More information about BCEF, its mission, and the annual campaign can be found at BatesvilleEducationFounation.org. Wilson may be reached at [email protected] or at 812-934-2194.last_img read more

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